Imatges de pàgina
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That was my

Which, as I think, you know not: here's a letter,
Found in the pocket of the flain Rodorigo,
And here another, one of them imports
The death of Caffio to be undertook
By Rodorigo.

Oih. Oh villain !
Caf. Most heathenish and most grofs.

Lód. Now here's another discontented paper
Found in his pocket too; and this, it seems,
Rodorigo meant have sent this damned villain;
But that, belike, Iago in the interim
Came in and satisfied him.

Oth. Oh thou pernicious caitiff !
How came you, Caffio, by that handkerchief

wife's?
Caf. I found it in my chamber;
And he himself confess'd it but even now,
That there he dropp'd it for a special purpose,
Which wrought to his desire.

Oth. Oh fool, fool, fool!

Caf. There is besides, in Rodorigo's letter,
How he upbraids lago that he made him
Brave me upon the watch; whereon it came
That I was caft; and even now he spake,
After long seeming dead, lago hurt him,
Iago set him on.
Lod. You must forsake this

room,

and
go

with Your power

and your command is taken off, (us: And Cassio rules in Cyprus. For this slave, If there be any cunning cruelty, That can torment him much, and hold him long, It shall be his. You fhall close prisoner reit, Till that the nature of your fault be known To the Venetian itate. Come, bring him away.

Oth. Soft you; a word or two before you go. I've done the State fome service, and they know't;

No more of that. I pray you, in your letters,
When you shall these unlucky deeds relate,
Speak of me as I am. Nothing extenuate,
Nor set down aught in malice. Then must you

speak
Of one that loved, not wisely, but too well ;
Of one, not easily jealous, but being wrought,
Perplexed in the extreme; of one, whose hand, (55)

(55)

of 01?e, whese hand,
Like the base Indian, threw a pearl away

Picher than all his tribe.? I have restored, 7ulian, from the elder Quarto, as the gennine and more eligible reading. Mr Pope thinks, this was occasioned probably by the word tribe just after : I have many reasons to oppose to this opie nion. in the first place, the most ignorant Indian, I beTeve, is to far the reverse of the donghil-cock in the fable, as to know the estimation of a pearl, beyond tha' of a barley-corn So that, in that respect, the thought it'elf would not be just. Then, if onr Author bad defigned to reflect on the ignorance of the Indian without any farther reproach, he would have called him rude, and not base. Again, I am persuaded, as my friend Mr Warburton long ago ob. served, the phrase is not here literal. bui metaphorical: and, by his per!, our Author, very properly means a fine wo

To instance only in two panages from his Troilus, of the like visage;

Her bea is India; there the iyes, a peril.
Is the worib kerping? why, He is a penr!,
Whole price bath launched above a thousand tips,

And turned crowned Kings to merchants. But Mr Pope objects farther to reading Fudiar, because, to make sense of this, we must presuppose some particular fory of a Jew alluded to, which is much leis obvious: ut has Shakespeare never done this but in this single instance? Let us turn back, for prvot, tothis Twelfth Night;

Why should I not. had I the heart to do't,
Like to th' Ægyptian thief, at point of death,

Kill what I love Here is a particular story hinted at, (which I have explains ed in the proper place) much leis obvious than the story above presuppofed. But this we are to observe of Shakies.

man.

one, whose

Like the base Judian, threw a pearl away
Richer than all his tribe; of

eyes,
Albeit unused to the melting mood,
Drop tears as fast as the Arabian trees
Their medicinal gum. Set you down this ;
And say besides, that in Aleppo once,
Where a malignant and a turbaned Turk
Beat a Venetian, and traduced the State,
I took by the throat the circumcised dog,
And fmote him thus.

[Stabs himself Lod. Oh bloody period ! Gra. All that is spoke is marred.

speare, that though both his stories are introduced tacita nomine, his allusion and simile are as clear as if he had given us the express history. Ben Johnson, I am sure, does not always convey his allufions in the same clcarness.

I have a husband, and a two-legged one,
But such a moonling, as no wit of man,

Or roses, can redeem from being an a/s. Here is a story presupposed, but fo darkly couched, that, I dare warrant, scarce one reader in five hundred of this Poet ever guessed at it. Nor can any one know what he would be at, who has not read either Lucian or Apuleius; and observed, that when Lucius, by a magical unguent, was converted into an afs, the only means of recovering his owo form, was for him to browse on fresh roses. I hope the explication of this obscure paflage will compensate for the digreflion. But, to return to my Author. Tam fatisfied, in his fudian, he is alluding to Herod; who, in a fit of blind jealousy, threw away such a jewel of a wife as Marianne was to him. What can be more parallel in circumstance, than the conduct of Herod and Othello ? Nor was the story so little obvious as Mr Pope seems to imagine : for, in the year 1613, the Lady Elizabeth Carew published a Tragedy called Mariam, the fruit Queen of Jewry. I fall only add, that our Author might write Failian or Judean, (if that should be alledged as any objection) instead of Judæan, with the same license and change of accent, as, in his Antony ani Cleopatra, he 'thortens the second syllable of Euphrates in pronunciation, VOL. XII.

Dd

Oth. I kiss'd thee, ere I killed thee. No way but this,

[To Desdem. Killing myself, to die upon a kifs.

[Dies. Caf. This did I fear, but thought he had no For he was great of heart.

[weapon, Lod. Oh Spartan dog !

[To lago
More fell than anguish, hunger, or the sea !
Look on the tragic loading of this bed ;
This is thy work. The object poisons fight,---
Let it be hid.. Gratiano, keep the house,
And seize upon the fortunes of the Moor,'
For they fucceed to you. To you, Lord Governor,
Remains the censure of this hellish villain :
The time, the place, the torture, oh! inforce it.
Myself will straight aboard; and to the State
This heavy act with heavy heart relate.

[Exeunio

1

IN DE X

O E T H E

CHARACTERS, SENTIMENTS,

SIMILIES,

SPEECHES and DESCRIPTIONS

IN

& H A K E S P E A R E.

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