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ON BIGHT FROM YORK.

| From Scarbor.

From
York.

ON LEFT FROM YORK

Firby.

267

Welham House.

Scagglethorpe, 1 mile.

Scampston Hall, Knapton Hall. West and East Heslerton; beyond, the elevated tract of the York Wolds.

Potter Brompton.

Binnington and be yond, Ganton Hall, Sir T. D. Legard, Bart.

Castle Howard St. 161

Castle Horari,

Earl of Carlisle (p. 16.) Hutton St. 19

Hilderley, Sir G.

Strickland, Bart.,
A cr. river Derwent.

Easthorpe Hall,

Mosley Bank
NEW MALTON, 214 Old Malton.

(p. 416.)
16} Rillington Junction St. 261 Line to Pickering and

Whitby, 304 miles
Knapton St.

Yeddingham.
Heslerton St.
97 Sherburn St. 33}| Valley of river Der-

went. 12 miles distant, Wyke

ham Abbey. 73 Ganton St. 35

Willerby.

Staxton.

3 | Seamer Junction St. 394

Here the line from Hall and Bridlington joins (see p. Hackness Hall, Sir J. 453).

V. B. Johnstone, Bart, SCARBOROUGH, (p. 423). | 42115 miles.

CLXV. YORK TO PICKERING AND WHITBY, BY RAILWAY, 667 Miles.

ON RIGHT FROM YORK.

From
Whitby.

ON LEIT FROY TOEK

| From

York.

From York to Leave line to Scarbo- 301 rough, 164 miles.

Rillington Junction St. (261 Scampston Hall.

(as above)

cr. river Derwent. Thornton-le-Dale 2m. 1 271 Marishes Road St. / 2971

Kirkby Misterton, 18 About 5 miles distant| 24 | PICKERING (see p. 416.) | 32 mile. are some remarkable

The line hence rang ancient entrenchments, called Scamridge Dykes,

through Newton Dale, one of probably either of Danish

the narrow valleys which exor Saxon origin.

tend in a longitudinal direcKingthorpe.

tion through the high region Lockton. of the North York Moorlands.

Newton. Blackhow Topping, al

Near Casthorn, ! . Levisbam St.

distant, are the remains lofty eminence, 2 miles.

of two Roman camp On the adjacent moor.

and beyond, at Cropton, lands are numerous tu.

one of British origin. muli, and other ancient works.

Goathland Moor. 91 Goathland St.

| 18

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CLXVI. LONDON TO WELLS (NORFOLK), THROUGH CAMBRIDGE, ELY, AND

LYNN, 123 miles.

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ELY stands on a considerable emidence in the Isle of Ely, a large tractor

high land encompasged with fens that were formerly covered with water. A monastery was founded here about 670. In 870, it was pillaged and destroyed by the Danes, and was not rebuilt till about a century later, when a charter was granted by Edgar, which was confirmed by Canute and Edward the Confessor, and subsequently by the Pope. The isle was gallantly defended against William the Conqueror; but, after repeated attacks, the inhabitants were obliged to surrender. In 1107, Ely was erected into a bishopric by Henry I. After the dissolution of the monasteries, Henry VIII. converted the conventual church into a cathedral. This building displays a singular mixture of various styles of architecture, and has an unfinished appearance, but, as a whole, it is a noble structure. The interior is exceedingly beautiful, and much has been done during the present century to restore and beautify the various chapels it contains. The stalls are fine specimens of wood carving. The whole length of the edifice is upwards of 520 feet. The Church of the Holy Trinity, formerly the Lady Chapel, is attached to the cathedral. It was commenced in the reign of Edward II., and is one of the most perfect buildings of that age. The Church of St Mary is also handsome. Here are also several meeting-houses, a grammar-school, founded by Henry VIII., a national school, charity school, &c. Ely has a considerable manufactory for earthenware and tobacco pipes, and there are several mills in the isle for the preparation of oil from flax, hemp, and cole seed. Pop. 1851, 6176.

The Bishop of Ely has considerable patronage at Cambridge.

Lynx or Lyxx REGIS, a place of great antiquity, is situated on the right bank of the Ouse, about eight or nine miles from the sea. It is divided into several parts by four small rivers, called fleets, and was formerly encompassed on the land side by a foss, defended by a wall and bastions. The harbour is difficult of entrance, but capable of receiving 300 sail of vessels. There is a large quantity of wine imported from Portugal and Spain, and of hemp, wood, and flax, and other articles from the Baltic. Customs' revenue 1850, £37,106:17:2. The marketplace is very extensive and handsome, and the quays for landing wine are convenient. The principal church, St Margarets, is one of the largest parochial churches in England, and is especially rich in monumental brasses. It was erected in 1160, and repaired and enlarged in 1741. There are several other churches or chapels, various meeting-houses, a guild-ball, custom-house, theatre, hospital, a free grammar-school, St Ann's Fort, the promenade called the Mall, the ruins of the Grey Friars' Church, a mechanics' institute, &c. There is communication by railway between Lynn and all the principal towns of the empire. Two M.P. Pop. 1851, 19,355.

CASTLE RISING, five miles north-west of Lynn, and two miles from the Wash on the Rising river, is a place of great antiquity. Some have supposed that Alfred the Great built a castle here. At any rate, a castle enclosing a fragment of a more ancient building, erected here by William de Albini, existed before 1176. Of this fortress there are considerable remains. Here Isabella, Queen of Ed. ward II., was kept in confinement by her son Edward III, from 1330 till her

death in 1368. The church is an ancient structure, and contains a highly orna. mented font. There is a national school and a hospital, with a chapel, built by the Earl of Northampton in 1613. Castle Rising formerly returned two M.P., but was disfranchised by the Reform Bill. Pop. 378.

FLITCHAM was formerly called Felixham and St Mary de Fontibus, from the numerous springs in the vicinity. Four miles distant is Houghton Hall (Mar. quis of Cholmondeley), a stately fabric erected by the celebrated Sir Robert Walpole, who was interred in the church. The famous gallery of painting which this mansion once contained, was sold by the 3d Earl of Orford (of the first creation), in 1779, to Catherine II. of Russia for £40,000, and they now de corate one of the palaces of St Petersburgh.

CLXVII. LONDON TO LYNN THROUGH ROYSTON, CAMBRIDGE, ST. IVES,

CHATTERIS, MARCH, AND WISBEACH, 1071 Miles.

ON RIGHT FROM LON

From
Lynn.

From
London,

ON LEE

LEFT FROY LOND.

chanho. / 889

From Shoreditch Ch. Madingley, Sir St. T. 561| to Cambridge, (p. 433.) 504|Cotten, Bart.

St Neots, 17 m. To Ely, 16 m.

cr. the river Cam. ST IVES, a small town,

pleasantly situated on the SOMERSHAM was for

Onse, over which is a merly annexed to the

rious and ancient stone monastery of Ely, and 507 Lolworth. 564 bridge, & a modern archcontained a palace be-1

ed causeway. This town longing to that see, the

Fen Stanton.

was nearly destroyed by site of which is now oc

Huntingdonshire.

fire in 1689. It carries on a cupied by other build.

considerable trade in malt! ings. The church is a

ST. IVES.

and coal, and its market spacious and noble edi

is noted for the sale of fice, containing several

Somersham.

cattle, sheep, pigs, poulancient brasses and mo

try, &c. The church, a numents. The chancel

light, neatstructure, with is supposed to be of the

Chatteris Ferry. 1 731 a handsome tower, contime of Henry III.

tains numerous sepulCHATTERIS has a

chral monuments. Here church, a nationalschool, 1 cr, the river Nen, are several meetingand the remains of a and enter the Isle of Ely, houses, and someremains chapel at Hunnev Farm.

Camb.

of an ancient priory! Wisbeach derives its name

Slepe Hall, at St Ives, from its situation on the banks of the river Ouse or

was the residence of OLWis, which fows through it.

Chatteris.

ver Cromwell when he It is about elght miles from

rented Wood Farm in the the German Ocean. The old I castle was rebuilt by Thurloe, | 30 | Carter's Bridge." 1777 vicinity. Pop. 1851, 3532

* About 7 miles distant is RAMSEY, formerly containing a rich Benedictine abbey, founded by Duke Aylwin in the reign of Edgar, but a ruined gateway is the only portion of it now remaining. The church is an elegant and spacious structure. Pop. 1851, 2641. In the vicinity are several lakes and meres, one of which, called Ramsey Mere, has fertile and beantful banks, and abounds with pike, perch, and eels. Near the town is Ramsey Abbey, the beautiful seat of E. Fellowes, Esq. Eight miles from Ramsey is WAITTLESEY, possessing three churches, several chapels, charity schools, and alms-houses. Pop. 1851, 54T2. Whib tlesey Mere produces excellent fish, and is much frequented by parties of pleasure.

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