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THE LATE EMMA ROBERTS.

NOTES of an OVERLAND.JOURNEY through FRANCE and EGYPT to BOMBAY.C Wife Remarks upon Aden and Bombay. By the late Miss Emma Roberts. With a Memoir of the Authoress. Post 8vo. cloth lettered, 10s 6d.

Opimioks Oe: JSiiBj Pubs*.

"Miss Roberts is entitled to the distinction of being the first writer who succeeded in furnishing sketches of Indian scenery, life, and manners, suited to the taste of European readers. The descriptions of the successive scenes and objects are written with the vivacity, ease, aucl fidelity, which characterise her former work."—rimes, May 20, 1841.

"We recommend the present volume to 'our public' as one of the most graphic and agreeable of travel that has issued from the press for many seasons."—Atlas.

"The matter communicated is interesting, and the lively manner in which it is conveyed adds greatly to that interest."— Literary Gazette. . ra

"Her descriptions of Alexandria, Cairo, the De9ert, Aden, and Bombay, are unequalled by any known traveller for their truth, fulness, and compass of observation."—East India Telegraph.

"We shall only be doing justice to a work of so much, real merit, usefulness, and originality, by expressing the great pleasure we have derived from its perusal', and by entreating for it a favourable reception from the public."—Britannia.

"The writer of this pleasant volume has evidently allowed nothing worthy of note to2esvape her; and her account of the presidency of Bombay, which takes up nearly a third of the volume, is as valuable for the Information it contains, as it is entertaining for the lively manner in which it is conveyed."— New Monthly Magazine. _

"By persons meditating a similar journey, the book of course will be eagerly read; and not a few of its hints will be found profitable. ^The disposition and manner of the writer are worthy of close imitation."—Monthly Review.

"These ' Notes' compose a very attractive volume, abounding with vivid delineations, of Eastern scenes, and with animated pictures of external life and manners."—CheltenJiam Chronicle.

"This is a volume of great interest."—Statesman.

"It is impossible to read this work without a feeling of profound melancholy, for every page reminds us of the intellectual brightness which has passed away. Few writers have possessed, in a higher degree, the talent of making one an actual spectator of the scenes described, so vividly and truthfully are they brought before the mental eye"—Court Journal.

"These ' Notes' exhibit the same spirit of observation, and are as replete with interesting descriptions of the gorgeous East, as the other productions of Miss Roberts."—Courier.

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These highly-amusing Volumes arte the result of three years' attentive observation of the Upper Provinces of Bengal, and of a twelvemonth's residence at Calcutta. The fidelity of the description has been attested by every competent judge. The work combines instruction with amusement, for it affords to persons about to visit India, the advantages and conveniences of a Hand-Book. ••''•'

"Miss Roberts's book, entitled Scenes. and Characteristics qf Hindustan, is the best of its kind. Other travellers have excelled her in depth and sagacjfy of remark, in extent of information, and in mere,.force or elegance of style; but there Is.a vivacity, a delicacy, and a truth, in her light sketches of all that lay immediately before her, that have never been surpassed in any book of travels that is at this moment present to our memory. She had a peculiar readiness in receiving, and a singular power of retaining, first impressions of the most minute and evanescent nature. She walked through a street or a buzaar, and every thing that passed over the mirror of her mind left a clear and lasting trace. She was thus enabled, even years after a visit to a place of interest, to describe every thing with the same freshness and fidelity as if she had taken notes upon the spot. They who have gone over the ssme ground, are delighted to find in the perusal of her pages their own vague and halffaded impressions revived and defined by her magic glass, while the novelty and vividness of her foreign pictures make her home readers feel that they are nearly as much entitled to be called travellers as the fair author herself. They truly accompany her. They see with her eyes, and hear with her ears. They are present on the spot described. Her pictures have that air of sincerity and truth whieh we sometimes trace in a portrait, with the living original of which we may be wholly unacquainted. Her readers trust her, and resign the reins of their imagination into the author's hands."—Calcutta Literary Gazette.

ALLEN'S MAPS OF INDIA & CHINA,

ALL FROM THE LATEST SURVEYS.

I.
MAP OF INDIA.

Extending from 35 degrees N. to 7 degrees S. latitude, and 66 degrees W to
101 degrees E. longitude. On six sheets, £2 12s. Gd.; or, on cloth, in a case
£3 13s. 6d. ''

••• This Map comprises on the North and Welt, Cabul, Jellalabad, Peshawar. Kashmeer
kalat, rtolan Pass, yueta, Sehwan, Ghuznee, Sic, and on the East, Yunan, in China.

II.

A SMALLER MAP OF THE SAME.
On two sheets, 18s.; or, on cloth, in a case, 25s.

III.

MAP OF THE ROUTES IN INDIA.

With Tables of Distances between the principal Towns and Military Stations.
On one sheet, 9s.; or, on cloth, in a case, 12s.

IV.

MAP OF THE OVERLAND ROUTES BETWEEN ENGLAND
AND INDIA.

With the other Lines of Communication. On one sheet, 9s.; or, on cloth
in a case, 12s.

V.

MAP OF AFFCHANISTAN.

Shewing the Passes and Distances of Marches. Drawn by John Walkeb.
On one sheet, 9s.; or, on cloth, in a case, 12s, (Nearly Ready.)

VI.
MAP OF THE WESTERN PROVINCES OF HINDOOSTAN.

On four sheets, £1 lis. 6J.; or, on cloth, in a case, £2 5s.

VII.

MAP OF CHINA.

From the most authentic Information. On one large sheet, 8s.; or on cloth
in a case, lis.

VIII.
INDEX,

Containing the Names and Geographical Position of all Places in the Maps of
India, 12mo. cloth, 10s.

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