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Pitcombe.

Ata distance, Redlynch Hadspen House,

Park, Earl of Ilchester.

To Shaftesbury, 15) m. Cadbury House.

To Castle Cary, through 264 Sherborne, *(Dortsetsh.) 365
Sparkford, 114 m., and to
Yeovil, 51 m.

cr. river Frome.

DORCHESTER, P. 44. 545 Maiden Castle, one of 5 Monkton, 157 Came Abbey, the strongest and most extensive British camps

MELCOMBE REGIS. 624w. Williams, Esq.

Herringston Lodge, E. in England. It consists of In hill enclosed by two, and,

Pop. of Parl, bor, of Melin some places, three

cumbe and Weymouth, ditches, and the enclosed

1851, 9458. area contains upwards of

o cr. riv. Wey.

Lulworth Castle, J. 110 acres.

WEYMOUTH,

Weld, Esq., 16 m. fron

62 Weymouth, is frequently (See p. 44.) I visited by strangers.

• Sherborne is situated on a branch of the Yeo, which divides it into two parts, called Sherborne and Castleton. In the latter are the ruins of a castle, the last place that held out for King Charles. The principal object of attention is the church, which was a cathedral till the see was removed to Old Sarum in 1075. It was then converted into an abbey church, and is now one of the finest in the west of England, containing specimens of various styles of architecture, from the time of the Normans to that of Henry VII. In the south transept is a splendid monument to the memory of John, Earl of Bristol, who died in 1698. Near this is a tablet with lines by Pope, to the memory of a son and daughter of William Lord Digby. Here also Sir Thomas Wyatt the poet was buried. The abbey is now occupied as a silk manufactory. Pop. 1851, 3878. Adjoining the town is Sherborne Castle, the seat of Lord Digby. The centre was built by Sir Walter Raleigh, whose family were robbed of the estate by James I.

ILVIII. BATH TO BRIDPORT THROUGH SHEPTON MALLET, ILCHESTER,

AND CREWKERNE, 641 Miles.

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XLIX. BATH TO EXETER THRQUGH SHEPTON MALLET, ILMINSTER,

AND HONITON, 75 Miles.

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From
Exeter.

ON RIGHT FROM BATH.

From
Bath,

ON LEFT FROM BATH.

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Stratton House
63 Stratton on the Fosse. 117|
Oakhill 141. Ashwick, Grove,

Strachey, Esq.
cross the Mendip Hills.
1594 SHEPTON MALLET, 161|

(p. 107.)
57!

Cannard's Grave Inn. (171) East Pennard Park.

Street on the Fosseway. 1971 5541

Wraxball. 2141

541 3m, distant, King's Wes-501)

West Lydford. 241 ton House, F.H. Dickinson, Kag.

cr. river Brue.
431| ILCHESTER, (p. 107.)

311
ILMINSTER
|16| AONITON, (p. 48.) 1589|

EXETER, (p. 110.) 175

4341

31

L BATH TO EXETER THROUGH BRIDGEWATER, AND TAUNTON,

614 Miles,

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UN RIGHT FROM BATH.

From
Exeter.

Prom
Bath.

ON LEFT FROM BATX

Spraydown House. Killerton Park, Sir T. D. 41 Broad Clist, 1761 Poltimore House, Lord Acland, Bart., M.P.

Poltimore. 21 Langaton. 179 EXETER. 1814, Wear House, (Sir J. T. B.

Duckworth, Bart.) acar

Topsham. Exeter, the capital of Devonshire, on the banks of the Exe, is a large city, extending about three miles in circunference. It is intersected by four principal streets, which meet in the centre. A handsome bridge has been thrown over the river at an expense of L.20,000. The cathedral of St Peter is a magnificent structure, and contains numerous monuments of its bishops and of the Bohun and Courtenay families. Its western window is much admired, and the Bishop's Throne is remarkable for its height and elaborate carving. The north tower contains a clock curiously ornamented, and an immense bell (the great Tom of Exeter), weighing 12,500 lbs., both the gifts of Bishop Courtenay. Near the cathedral (and south-east) is the Bishop's Palace, a venerable building. On the northeast of the city are the ruins of Rougemont Castle, said to have been erected in the time of Julius Cæsar, and formerly the residence of the West Saxon kings. The guildhall, in High Street, rebuilt in 1464, contains several valuable por. traits. A commodious custom-house has been erected on the quay. Northernhay, a public garden, well wooded and beautifully laid out, is the fashionable promenade, and commands a series of fine prospects. Formerly, Exeter was the emporium of thin woollen goods, such as serges, &c., spun and woven in the neighbouring towns, but finished in the city previous to exportation. The invention of machinery has, however, nearly destro ed these branches of trade, with the exception of that to India, which is still considerable. As Exeter is a kind of metropolis for Devon and Cornwall

, it receives the produce of these counties in exchange for foreign commodities. The country around Exe ter is very fertile, affording good pasture, corn, dairy, and fattening land, and abounding in fruit, especially apples, which yield plenty of the best cider. The river Exe is so far navigable, that by means of locks, vessels of 150 tons burden can come up to the city ; those that are larger remain at Topsham, and the largest at Exmouth; the mouth of the river three miles lower. The diocese includes nearly the whole of Devon and Cornwall. In Exeter, there is a considerable number of churches belonging to the Establishment ; several chapels of ease, and a few dissenting meeting-houses ; numerous charitable institutions, and a neat theatre. The city is divided, for municipal purposes, into six wards, and is governed by a mayor, twelve aldermen, and thirty-five councillors It returns two members to Parliament. The markets are held on Tuesday and Friday, and there is a good fish-ınarket daily. The population in 1841 amounted to 31,312, and in 1851 to 40,688

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