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my family, but it is not so. Mrs. Entwistle him of its truth. Whether I fail in this, is my aunt, it is true, but I have yet living or whether I succeed, all I should ask of a father, who has discarded me.

him would be the permission to bear his Discarded you, Gerald—for what?"

I want no money from him. I “Principally for siding with my mother, would take none." with whom also he had quarrelled, believing “ Then if your father is still obdurate she had deceived him. It has just been against you, Gerald, you will go on living my fortune to discover that his suspicions as you have done lately?”

my mother were utterly unfounded, and “Not entirely, little Rose. In the first I am going to him to-morrow to prove this place, I shall have you with me, and in the to him."

next I am determined to shake off this laziComing on such an errand he will be ness ander which I have so long been sure to welcome you and take you back labouring, and to work for

my living.” into favour, Gerald,” said Rose, with yet “That's good hearing, Gerald," said the a touch of sadness in her voice.

girl, looking ap delightedly at him. “What 'I am by no means so sure of that. If you said last, I mean,” she added, noticing he does, well and good. I will ask nothing the smile upon his face; "though I don't of him but his recognition and his name. mean to deny that to become your wife “What is his name, Gerald ?”

will be the fulfilment of my dream of "That you shall not know, little Rose, happiness." until I have seen him. Curious, too, that " It is very sweet of you to make such a you should ask, as it is a matter in which confession. How long have you had this you may be interested.”

dream, Rose?” “I, Gerald ? How ?”

“Almost all my life, it seems to me. It “Surely you must know ! Surely long began I think in the old days at Wexeter, ere this your heart must have told you how when you used to give me drawing lessons dear you are to me, Rose. Will you not in Miss Cave's lodgings. You recollect answer me ?” he said, taking her hand and Wexeter, Gerald, and Madge ?" passing it lightly through his arm.

“Yes,” he said, “of course I recollect “I-I-I thought you liked me, Gerald,” Madge well.” said the girl, looking down.

“I was almost jealous of Madge once, I “Liked you!” he echoed, with a laugh. remember. I used to think you

liked her, “I like you so much that I am going to Gerald, but that of course was absurd. ask you to be my wife, to share my for- Poor darling Madge, how surprised she tunes, and to take my name when," he will be at what I have to tell her! I shall added, with a touch of bitterness, “when write to her directly I get home.” it is decided under what name the re- “I think you had better leave it until mainder of my life is to be passed! What you can tell her something more definite, answer do you give me, Roso ?”

dearest,” said Gerald. “By to-morrow She gave him none, beyond what was night I shall know what effect the comconveyed in the momentary upward glance munication I have to make to you will of her large eyes, and in the slight pressure have upon my father, and you can then from the little hand that trembled on his write more fully as to your future to your arm. It was, however, apparently enough sister. Now talk to me about yourself. for Gerald, who, after glancing hastily round to see that there were no observers The approach of autumn, which strikes within sight, bent down and touched her with dismay the inhabitants of most waterforehead with his lips.

ing-places, whether inland or on the coast, " Thank you, dearest one," he said. is regarded very calmly by the dwellers in “You are taking a leap in the dark, and Springside, for to those who have been have not the least idea what fate may be prudent enough to invest their savings in in store for you. But, whatever it is, 1 lodging-houses in that favourite spot, there shall be by your side to share its troubles. is no portion of the year which does not Another twenty-four hours will determine bring its due amount of profit and gain. whether I am to remain an outcast under When the summer is over, and the London a false name, or to resume my position families, who have been making a holiday as my father's son.”

sojourn in the city of springs, return to “You are determined, then, to see your the city of smuts, the Springsidites view father, Gerald ?”

the departure of their visitors with perIt is my duty to tell him what fect composure. They know that after a I have heard, and to endeavour to satisfy very short interval, jast long enough for

“ I am.

them to go through the process of a Geoffry was seated at the window of the "thorough clean up," and the substitution of dining-room, looking out into the garden, winter for summer furniture, their lodgings and wondering what he should do if chance will be again filled, and this time by a class ever removed Mrs. Pickering from his serof tenant, rich, valetudinarian, and certain vice. The mere idea of such a contingency to remain for many weeks. This interval, made him hot with vexation; it was not like however, though made much of by those the same place without her, and nothing who take advantage of it for the perform- seemed to go on rightly in her absence. ance of necessary labour, is generally voted “And yet,” said the old general to him. desperately dull by the better class of in- self, “and yet I'm likely to lose her at any habitants, most of whom try to make their moment. She's a young woman still

, and escape to more congenial places. Sir

Sir a handsome woman, and attractive in every Geoffry, in particular, very much resented way, and is certain to be picked up sooner the state of affairs at this doll season of the or later. If I were a younger man myself year. Most of his club cronies were away; I should be too glad of such a wife; and it was next to impossible to get up a rubber; of course there are hundreds who have the and even the few friends admitted to the same idea. Perhaps at this

very

moment intimacy of Wheatcroft, were among the there is some confounded fellow talking to defanlters. Cleethorpe was shooting in her, and making up his mind that he'll ask Scotland, and Mr. Drage had gone over to her to marry him. What's that?” attend a church congress, which was being He started, and, shading his eyes with held at Bircester. Sir Geoffry could have his hand, peered out into the gloaming. put up with all of this if Mrs. Pickering “ I could have sworn I saw a figure," he had been at home to talk with and read to said, turning back into the room, “but him, but she had asked for a few days' there is nothing there. I'm nervous toholiday, and of course he had not dreamed night, and shall set the doctor's warning at of refusing her.

defiance, and take a glass or two of port. The instant she was gone, the old gene- Absurd to think that a man of my figure, ral felt her loss. There was a letter from without any hereditary tendency to gout, Irving—a long letter-full of business, should which he would have liked to submit to He stopped, attracted by the noise her consideration, and in which he would made by the opening of the door, and not stir without her advice. He had grown looked in that direction. He saw the door accustomed to consult his housekeeper in open, and a man's figure enter the room almost everything, and to place great re- and advance quickly towards him. For an liance on her judgment.

instant the old general thought he was “A wonderful woman, sir !" Sir Geoffry attacked, and his hand closed upon the said of Mrs. Pickering to his friend Clee- neck of the decanter he was lifting from thorpe, just before the gallant captain the sideboard, as his handiest weapon of started for his shooting-box in the High defence. lands. “A wonderful woman!

The figure, however, stood upright and men have a knack of hitting the right nail motionless before him. As far as he could on the bead, but this they do by accident, make out in the dull uncertain light it was by intuition, as it is called, and can never that of a tall, well-knit young man, with a tell you why! Now, Mrs. Pickering is full and flowing beard. always right, and can always give you her Sir Geoffry eyed it for a moment in reason for being so. You did me an im- silence, then he said : “Who are you, and mense service, sir, when you persuaded what is your business here, sir?”. that lady to undertake the management of “I want to see you, was the reply; my household.”

but no sooner did the old general hear But Mrs. Pickering was gone, and had the tones of the voice from which it was taken her judgment with her, and Sir attered, than he relaxed his hold of the Geoffry was left alone, to use strong lan- decanter, and stepping a pace forward, guage at his loneliness and the dreariness waved his hand toward the door. of his house, and to render the lives of his “I know you now!” he cried, in loud and servants almost insupportable, by the variety angry tones; “I cannot discern your feaof his orders and the caprices of his queru- tures, but I recognise your voice! How lous temper.

you insult me by your presence ? Leave On the second night after Madge's de- the house at once !" parture, just at the time that she was Father,” said the young man, submisentering the grounds at Hollycombe, Sir sively.

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my family, but it is not so. Mrs. Entwistle him of its truth. Whether I fail in this, is my aunt, it is true, but I have yet living or whether I succeed, all I should ask of a father, who has discarded me.

him would be the permission to bear his “Discarded you, Gerald—for what?”

I want no money from him. I “Principally for siding with my mother, would take none." with whom also he had quarrelled, believing “ Then if your father is still obdurate she had deceived him. It has just been against you, Gerald, you will go on living my fortune to discover that his suspicions as you have done lately?” of my mother were utterly unfounded, and “Not entirely, little Rose. In the first I am going to him to-morrow to prove this place, I shall have you with me, and in the

next I am determined to shake off this laziComing on such an errand he will be ness ander which I have so long been sure to welcome you and take you back labouring, and to work for my living.” into favour, Gerald,” said Rose, with yet “That's good hearing, Gerald," said the a touch of sadness in her voice.

girl, looking up delightedly at him. “What “I am by no means so sure of that. If you said last, I mean,” she added, noticing he does, well and good. I will ask nothing the smile upon his face; “though I don't of him but his recognition and his name.” mean to deny that to become your wife “What is his name, Gerald ?"

will be the fulfilment of my dream of “That you shall not know, little Rose, happiness.” until I have seen him. Carious, too, that “ It is very sweet of you

to make such a you should ask, as it is a matter in which confession. How long have you bad this you may be interested.”

dream, Rose ?" “I, Gerald ? How ?”

“ Almost all my life, it seems to me.

It “ Surely you must know ! Surely long began I think in the old days at Wexeter, this

your heart must have told you how when you used to give me drawing lessons dear you are to me, Rose. Will you not in Miss Cave's lodgings. You recollect answer me ?” he said, taking her hand and Wexeter, Gerald, and Madge ?” passing it lightly through his arm.

“Yes,” he said, “of course I recollect “I-I-I thought you liked me, Gerald,” Madge well.” said the girl, looking down.

“I was almost jealous of Madge once, I “Liked you !" he echoed, with a laugh. remember. I used to think you liked her, “I like you so much that I am going to Gerald, but that of course

was absurd. ask you to be my wife, to share my for- Poor darling Madge, how surprised she tunes, and to take my name when,” he will be at what I have to tell her! I shall added, with a touch of bitterness, “when write to her directly I get home.” it is decided under what name the re- “I think you had better leave it until mainder of my life is to be passed! What you can tell her something more definite, answer do you give me, Rosc?”

dearest,” said Gerald. “By tomorrow She gave hinı none, beyond what was night I shall know what effect the comconveyed in the momentary upward glance munication I have to make to you will of her large eyes, and in the slight pressure have upon my father, and you can then from the little hand that trembled on his write more fully as to your future to your arm. It was, however, apparently enough sister. Now talk to me about yourself.” for Gerald, who, after glancing hastily round to see that there were no observers The approach of autumn, which strikes within sight, bent down and touched her with dismay the inhabitants of most waterforehead with his lips.

ing-places, whether inland or on the coast, “Thank you, dearest one,” he said. is regarded very calmly by the dwellers in "You are taking a leap in the dark, and Springside, for to those who have been have not the least idea what fate may be prudent enough to invest their savings in in store for you. But, whatever it is, 1 lodging-houses in that favourite spot, there shall be by your side to share its troubles. is no portion of the year which does not Another twenty-four hours will determine bring its due amount of profit and gain. whether I am to remain an outcast under When the summer is over, and the London a false name, or to resume my position families, who have been making a holiday father's son.

sojourn in the city of springs, return to “You are determined, then, to see your the city of smuts, the Springsidites view father, Gerald ?"

the departure of their visitors with perIt is my duty to tell him what fect composure. They know that after a I have heard, and to endeavour to satisfy | very short interval, just long enough for

1

as my

“I am.

G

them to go through the process of a Geoffry was seated at the window of the “thorough clean up," and the substitution of dining-room, looking out into the garden, winter for summer furniture, their lodgings and wondering what he should do if chance will be again filled, and this time by a class ever removed Mrs. Pickering from his serof tenant, rich, valetudinarian, and certain vice. The mere idea of such a contingency to remain for many weeks. This interval, made him hot with vexation; it was not like however, though made much of by those the same place without her, and nothing who take advantage of it for the perform seemed to go on rightly in her absence. ance of necessary labour, is generally voted “ And yet,” said the old general to himdesperately dull by the better class of in- self, “and yet I'm likely to lose her at any habitants, most of whom try to make their moment. She's a young woman still

, and escape to more congenial places. Sir a handsome woman, and attractive in every Geoffry, in particular, very much resented way, and is certain to be picked up sooner the state of affairs at this dull season of the or later. If I were a younger man myself year. Most of his club cronies were away; I should be too glad of such a wife; and it was next to impossible to get up a rubber; of course there are hundreds who have the and even the few friends admitted to the same idea. Perhaps at this very

moment intimacy of Wheatcroft, were among the there is some confounded fellow talking to defaulters. Cleethorpe was shooting in her, and making up his mind that he'll ask Scotland, and Mr. Drage had gone over to her to marry him." What's that?” attend a church congress, which was being He started, and, shading his eyes with held at Bircester. Sir Geoffry could have his hand, peered out into the gloaming: put up with all of this if Mrs. Pickering “I could have sworn I saw a figure,” he had been at home to talk with and read to said, turning back into the room, “bat him, but she had asked for a few days there is nothing there. I'm nervous toholiday, and of course he had not dreamed night, and shall set the doctor's warning at of refusing her.

defiance, and take a glass or two of port. The instant she was gone, the old gene- Absurd to think that a man of my figure, ral felt her loss. There was a letter from without any hereditary tendency to gout, Irving—a long letter-full of business, shouldwhich he would have liked to submit to He stopped, attracted by the noise her consideration, and in which he would made by the opening of_the door, and not stir without her advice. He had grown looked in that direction. He saw the door accustomed to consult his housekeeper in open, and a man's figure enter the room almost everything, and to place great re- and advance quickly towards him. For an liance on her judgment.

instant the old general thought he was “A wonderful woman, sir !" Sir Geoffry attacked, and his hand closed upon the said of Mrs. Pickering to his friend Clee- neck of the decanter he was lifting from thorpe, just before the gallant captain the sideboard, as his handiest weapon of started for his shooting-box in the High-defence. lands. “A wonderful woman! Most wo- The figure, however, stood upright and men have a knack of hitting the right nail motionless before him. As far as he could on the bead, but this they do by accident, make out in the dull uncertain light it was by intuition, as it is called, and can never that of a tall, well-knit young man, with a tell you why! Now, Mrs. Pickering is full and flowing beard. always right, and can always give you her Sir Geoffry eyed it for a moment in reason for being so. You did me an im- silence, then he said : Who

are you, and mense service, sir, when you persuaded what is your business here, sir ?”. that lady to undertake the management of “I want to see you, was the reply; my household.”

but no sooner did the old general hear But Mrs. Pickering was gone, and had the tones of the voice from which it was taken her judgment with her, and Sir attered, than he relaxed his hold of the Geoffry was left alone, to use strong lan- decanter, and stepping a pace forward, guage at his loneliness and the dreariness waved his hand toward the door. of his house, and to render the lives of his “I know you now!” he cried, in loud and servants almost insupportable, by the variety angry tones; “I cannot discern your feaof his orders and the caprices of his queru- tures, but I recognise your voice! How lous temper.

you insult me by your presence ? Leave On the second night after Madge's de- the house at once !" parture, just at the time that she was “ Father," said the young man, submisentering the grounds at Hollycombe, Sir sively.

dare

your rights ?"

1

“I have forbidden you ever to use that despotic as the Venetian oligarchy, mysteword to me,” cried Sir Geoffry. “To rious as the Vehmgericht, corrupt as the what am I indebted, sir, for the honour of College of Cardinals in the worst days of this visit? The last time I saw you, you papal misrule. Deriving its power from the were full of your great career, and swag- immediate suffrages of the sovereign people, gered about not touching the money which submitting every autumn at the elections was your due. I presume that delusion is either for the mayoralty, shrievalty, comat an end, and that you have come to claim missionerships, or judgeships, its party

ticket to the approval of the public, in“I have,” said Gerald, “but not in the variably victorious over all its enemies by way that you imagine. I have come to such overwhelming majorities as to render claim my right to be regarded as your son ; opposition almost ridiculous, the city gomy mother's right to atonement for the vernment apparently contained all the elegrievous wrong you did to her while living, ments of solidity and permanence. It is true and which you have continued to her that an intelligent minority existed, but the memory! Oh, sir, I told you I would intelligence, wealth, and respectability of make it the business of my life to discover the great city has ever shown itself lamentthe real story of Mr. Yeldham's acquaint- ably apathetic on municipal and, indeed, ance with my mother, and to prove to you on all political questions. During a long that your jealous fears of her were ground residence in New York, the writer was less. I can prove all this to you now; I often astonished at the constant and utter have come here to do so!”

indifference to every subject of local ad“It is a lie!" cried the old man, stretch- ministration displayed by the prominent ing out his hands, and trembling with pas- citizens and great merchants. The answer sion. “You have come here because your invariably vouchsafed to all his queries funds are exhausted, and your creditors was, “ The whole thing was a dirty busirefuse to trust you further! You can have ness—too filthy for a gentleman to touch; the money, sir; it is yours by right; there far better to let things alone, bad as they is no occasion for you to descend to such were!” paltry subterfuge.

"You see," continued a thoroughly re"Father, I implore"

presentative New Yorker, “the rascals. “I insist, sir, upon your discontinuing who are in power now are gorged with to address me in that manner,” said the plunder; they have the most palatial resiold man, ringing the bell. “Make your ap-dences, the most gorgeous furniture. They plication to me in a business way, through drive the fastest horses, smoke the largest a lawyer, and it shall be attended to. cigars, drink the dearest brands of wine, Riley !” he cried to the servant, who ap- wear the biggest diamonds on the dirtiest peared at the door, “what were you doing hands, and eat—with their knives—the to permit this person to make his way into best dinners in the city. They have every my presence ? Show him out instantly, temptation (though I admit they very and never give him admittance here again. seldom yield to it) to act decently, and rob

Gerald looked as if he would have spoken, moderately, and we must admit that what but the old servant touched him on the they steal with one hand they scatter freely shoulder, and sorrowfully preceded him out with the other. Now, suppose for one moof the room.

ment that we were rid of these, and a fresh
lot came into power, the new men would

all be like greedy cormorants. They would
TAMMANY CHIEFS.

have everything to get, do you see? whereas

our present scoundrels have got it all. I The city of New York at this moment is guess we should only change the whips of the scene of a remarkable struggle between Tammany for the scorpions of a new and the people and what was a few short months famished crowd.” ago the strongest, and most absolutely irre- This gentleman by no means stood alone sponsible government in the world. The in his sentiments, and his remarks may be great and sumptuous city, spreading its taken as a very fair expression of the prewealth over the heights of Brooklyn and vailing opinion of what the Americans are the marshes of New Jersey, grasping in its pleased to call Uppertendom. The strong rich embrace the opposite shores of the interest in local politics which forms so rivers which enclose the famous island of large a portion of every.day life in England, Manhattan, has been for years prostrate appeared to be utterly lost in a sensation at the feet of a municipal government, of total and complete helplessness.

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