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cularize, to use a term more emphatic than polite, they were not handsome, but uncommonly genteel. On the 23rd of January, however, Mr. Mitchell is going to open this most recherché salle with a company befitting its high case. We have reason to believe that the French performers, engaged in every department of character, are superior to any who have yet appeared in this country.

We omitted to mention that the couple of farces that have been put upon the stage at the Princess's Theatre, have been displayed with all that regard to keeping and good arrangement so eminently its

characteristic.

"The Mysterious Family," at the ADELPHI, has not increased its number of stock pieces. Wright is the staple of the "drama," and his comicality even will not bear it out. For the rest there is always matter of amusement within the confined walls of this playhouse.

The arena of ASTLEY'S is attractive as ever; the grand spectacle of the month more than commonly so-" The Victories of Murat, the Soldier of France." We have not yet followed under Mr. Batty's wand of creation, but report speaks goldenly of his probable harvest; who can doubt it, when by merely passing the portals of the Westminster Bridge Theatre, the play-goer may luxuriate in the enjoyinents of the traveller-inspect the land of Egypt, the snow of Russia, and the scenery of Italy and Naples, with original variations, viewing each country without the disadvantage of change of climate? The" Promenade Concerts" have commenced their perambulations for the season at the ENGLISH OPERA HOUSE. The programme of each evening's entertainment is unexceptionable. Here we have harmony that does not usurp a national stage; here we have a popular amusement at a popular price; here, above all, we find a recreation of reasonable duration for those valuable classes whose time is money. The concerts of the SACRED HARMONIC SOCIETY and Mr. Braham's concerts are delectable treats to the lovers of quiet enjoyments. Handel's second attempt in the composition of oratorios was chosen as the opening oratorio of the season at the Harmonic. The episode of Deborah is a grand one among the incidents of the kingdom of Israel. The advance of Barak, and the defeat of Sisera and his assassination, are epic events. The subject is handled by the composer most richly; and, with five hundred performers on the platform, and with such vocal names as Miss Rainforth, Miss Dolby, Miss Cubitt, Mr. Phillips, &c., to head the phalanx, it was no wonder that this revival of Handel's "Deborah," after the lapse of a century, met with complete success.

The POLYTECHNIC prefers weekly some new claim on the scientific amateur and pupil.

The ADELAIDE GALLERY OF SCIENCE is running its career worthily, and to the manifest improvement of the rising generation. The CHINESE EXHIBITION is reinforced by a statue of Confucius, equally remarkable with the rest of the collection.

Other matters will be referred to in detail next month. With the winter season a host of novelties claim attention, and crowd upon the observer's notice, all of which go to prove the vast variety of Public Amusements in the Metropolis.

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Never was more attempted or accomplished towards the exclusion and total suppression of Turf defaulters than during the past season: from the first to the finish every point available, either in the laws of honour or the laws of the land, was successfully used against them. It now appears that the insolvents are about to have "a turn," on the Lex talionis principle, as qui tam actions have been commenced against noblemen, gentlemen, and many heavy-betting men, to recover penalties for gambling, that is, winning money by betting, to the amount of 300,000l. Amongst others already selected we may name Lord Eglinton, Lord George Bentinck, Colonel Peel, and Mr. Greville. The gentlemen engaged in this highly honourable and agreeable business are Messrs. Russell; the one as informer, the other as solicitor. All we hope is that their success will be equal to the pure intentions which induced them to set about it.

Mr. Weatherley, well-known in the racing world as the owner of the celebrated stallion, Sir Hercules, and also for several years Master of the Horse to Prince Esterhazy, died at his residence, East Acton, on the 19th of last month.

Lord Glasgow has engaged young Lonsdale as his private trainer; and his lordship's string has been removed from Newmarket to Middleham, where stables have been taken for them.

A draft from Lord Eglinton's stud was sold at the Corner, early in the month, at the following prices:-Dr. Caius, 225 gs.; Melior, 38 gs.; Pharold, 32 gs.; and The Leech, 25 gs. Three lots, the property of Dawson, his lordship's late trainer, were also knocked down at moderate prices.

Nat Flatman, that most practised and most successful of jockeys, rode 81 races during the past season, of which he claimed the first place in 32.

We are sorry to state that the Marquis of Waterford, in consequence of repeated attempts to poison his hounds, fire his stables, and other pleasantries of the kind, bespeaking the gratitude of the Irish peasantry, has declined hunting the Tipperary country, and is about to re-visit Melton. The Irish press teems with leading articles regretting his departure, and denouncing the villains who caused it; but can any one, after this treatment, wonder at the long and increasing list of Irish absentees?

Scotland, we also see, is about to lose a most enthusiastic lover of the chase, at least as a master of hounds, in Lord Kintore; the latter part of his advertisement being something sui generis, we give it-"There will be nearly eight couples of Jews, Gentiles, Turks, Infidels, and Heretics, collected from kennels lately, the perquisite of the huntsman. Would do well for the Chasse au Cerf in Scotland, or any Vulpecide' in an unhuntable country."

Coming nearer home, we find that a dinner has lately been given by the gentlemen of Devon to Sir Walter Carew, on the occasion of his giving up his hounds.

It will be remembered that when a Mr. Wood was shown out of the Grand Stand at Doncaster, he threatened, in no measured terms,

to bring actions against the steward and the officer, as the parties immediately concerned in "bowing him out." For a time he was as good as his word! proceedings having been commenced; these, however, upon consideration, have not been persevered in. Whether Mr. Wood fancies there are some little things which might tell against himself, or is awaiting to see the result of the speculation started by his brother exiles, we cannot take upon ourselves to say.

The betting during the past month has been anything but heavy, the early part of it being principally taken up in squaring the Newmarket accounts, while the room is now becoming every day less attractive. Rattan, from his superior performance for the Criterion, has obtained a decided call over the Stockbridge exquisite, and is progressively increasing his advantage, being now something like three points a-head. Loadstone, the Irish crack, we can say for certain, is now the property of Mr. Gregory, and has reached Isaac Day's stables at Northleach; it will be observed that this change has rather increased the confidence of his admirers. Of the Oaks we give no quotations, for the best of all possible reasons-there have been none to give.

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Printed by Joseph Rogerson, 24, Norfolk-street, Strand, London.

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