Shakespeare

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Macmillan and Company, 1909 - 304 pàgines

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Pàgina 24 - Alas ! alas ! Why, all the souls that were, were forfeit once; And He that might the vantage best have took, Found out the remedy: How would you be, If he, which is the top of judgment, should But judge you as you are? O, think on that; And mercy then will breathe within your lips, Like man new made.
Pàgina 126 - And let those that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them : for there be of them, that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too ; though, in the mean time, some necessary question of the play be then to be considered: that's villainous; and . shows a most pitiful ambition in the fool that uses it.
Pàgina 134 - Yes, trust them not ! for there is an upstart crow, beautified with our feathers, that with his " Tiger's heart wrapped in a player's hide," supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you ; and, being an absolute Johannes Factotum, is, in his own conceit, the only Shake-scene in a country.
Pàgina 25 - All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards and found her there.
Pàgina 19 - A poet is the most unpoetical of anything in existence, because he has no identity— he is continually in for and filling some other body. The sun— the moon— the sea and men and women who are creatures of impulse, are poetical and have about them an unchangeable attribute; the poet has none, no identity— he is certainly the most unpoetical of all God's creatures.
Pàgina 114 - And sable curls all silver'd o'er with white, When lofty trees I see barren of leaves Which erst from heat did canopy the herd, And summer's green all girded up in sheaves Borne on the bier with white and bristly beard, Then of thy beauty do I question make, That thou among the wastes of time must go...
Pàgina 112 - They that have power to hurt and will do none, That do not do the thing they most do show, Who, moving others, are themselves as stone...
Pàgina 223 - For thee, oppressed king, I am cast down ; Myself could else out-frown false fortune's frown. — Shall we not see these daughters and these sisters? Lear. No, no, no, no ! Come, let's away to prison ; We two alone will sing like birds i' the cage : When thou dost ask me blessing, I'll kneel down, And ask of thee forgiveness.
Pàgina 182 - His first defect is that to which may be imputed most of the evil in books or in men. He sacrifices virtue to convenience, and is so much more careful to please than to instruct, that he seems to write without any moral purpose.

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