Imatges de pÓgina
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manæuvres ; and he appealed to their and maneuvre in any reproachful or
Lordships, whether his intention, with unparliamentary sense.
respect to his vote, had not been Some trifling modifications in the
openly and candidly avowed. No- terms of the bill were then discussed,
thing was more justifiable or more and the House adjourned till the fol.
common in Parliamentary practice, lowing day.
than for a member who strongly dis- Next day (11th November) a good
approved of any measure, to endea- deal of desultory conversation took
vour to clog it with conditions which place, but without the possibility of
would procure its rejection. He ho. bringing forth any thing new on so
ped that those noble Lords who had beaten a subject. The vote at length
given a pledge that they would not being loudly called for, the numbers
vote for the bill with the divorce

appeared
clause, would now redeem that pledge, For the third reading, 108
and get rid of the bill altogether.- Against it,

99 Lord Lauderdale explained that he did not mean to use the words trick

Majority,

9*

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MAJORITY.S
Lord Harris
Bishop Ely

Earl Chatham
Ross (Glasgow)
St David's

Harcourt
Meldrum (Aboyne) Worcester

Warwick
Hill
St Asaph

Graham (Montrose)
Combermere
London

Pomfret
Hopetoun Viscount Exmouth

Macclesfield
Manners
Lake

Balcarras
Ailsa (Cassilis)
Sidmouth

Home
Lauderdale
Melville

Coventry
Sheffield
Curzon

Rochford
Redesdale
Sydney

Abingdon
St Helens
Hereford

Shaftesbury
Northwicke
Earl St Germains

Cardigan
Bolton
Whitworth

Winchelsea
Carrington
Verulam

Bridgewater
De Dunstanville

Cathcart

Marquis Conyngham
Rous
Mulgrave

Anglesey
Saltersford (Courtown) Orford

Camden
Stewart (Galloway) Manvers

Northampton
Stewart (Moray)
Rosse

Exeter
Douglas (Morton)
Nelson

Headfort
Grenville
Powis

Cornwallis
Suffield
Limerick

Buckingham
Montagu
Donoughmore

Lothian
Gordon (Huntley)
Belmore

Queensberry
Somers
Mayo

Winchester
Rodney

Longford

Duke Wellington
Middleton
Mount-Cashel

Northumberland
Napier
Kingston

Newcastle
Colville
Liverpool

Rutland
Gray
Digby

Beaufort
Saltoun

Mount-Edgecombe Earl Westmorland, C. P. S.
Forbes

Strange (Athol) Lord Chancellor
Bish. Cork and Ross

Abergavenny Arch. Canterbury
Llandaff

Ailesbury

Duke Clarence
Peterborough

Bathurst

York

Immediately after the vote, Lord able a number of Peers as the second, Dacre put in a petition from the he and his noble colleagues would Queen, praying to be heard by coun- have felt it their duty to persevere sel against the

passing of the bill. with the bill, and to send it down to The Earl of Liverpool rose imme- the other branch of the legislature. diately, and said that he apprehend. In the present state of the country, ed such a course would be rendered however, and with the division of senunnecessary by what he was about to timent so nearly balanced, just evinstate. He could not be ignorant of the ced by their Lordships, they had state of public feeling with regard to come to the determination not to prothis measure, and it appeared to be ceed farther with it. It was his intenthe opinion of the House that the bill tion, accordingly, to move that the should be read a third time only by question do pass that the bill be put a majority of 9 votes. Had the third on this day six months. reading been carried by as consider- Earl Grey entered into a vehement

MINORITY.

Lord Breadalbane

Lord Clifton (Darnley) Earl Ilchester
Erskine

Saye and Sele

Egremont
Arden

Howard

Fitzwilliam
Ellenborough

De la Zouch

Portsmouth
Alvanley

Clinton

Stanhope
Loftus Ely)

Dacre

Cowper
Fitzgibbon (Clare)

Audley

Dartmouth
Bayning

De Clifford

Oxford
Gwydyr
Bishop Glocester

Rosebery
Calthorpe
Viscount Granville

Jersey
Downay (Downe)

Anson

Albemarle
Yarborough

Duncan

Essex
Dundas

Hood

Thanet
Selsea

Leinster

Denbigh
Mendip (Clifden)

Torrington

Suffolk
Auckland

Falmouth

Derby
Gage

Bolingbroke Marquis Bath
Fisherwick (Donegal) Earl Blessington

Stafford
Amherst

Bradford

Lansdown
Kenyon

Morley

Duke Portland
Sherborne

Minto

Brandon
Berwick

Grey

Devonshire
Ashburton

Gosford

Bedford
Bagot

Romney

Grafton
Walsingham

Rosslyn

Richmond
Dynevor

Caledon

Somerset
Foley

Enniskillen Archbp. Tuam
Hawke

Farnham

York
Sunbridge (Argyll)

Carrick

Duke of Glocester
Ducie

Carnarvon
Holland

Mansfield

Contents, 108 Ponsonby (Besborough) Fortescue

Non-contents, 99
Grantham

Hilsborough (Downshire)
King

Grosvenor

Majority,
Belhaven
Delaware

In all, 207

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invective against the conduct of mi- the royal personage. Several of the nisters in the whole course of the Lords who spoke against the bill, and bill. He charged the servants of the even a part of those who protested Crown with the grossest neglect of against the second reading, declared duty, in the first instance, in listen- theirfull conviction of her guilt; while ing only to ex-parte evidence, and others, only conceiving that there was giving a willing credence to the most still a doubt remaining, claimed for exaggerated and unfounded calum- her, as for every accused, the benenies. They had thus for many months fit of that doubt. The friends of the agitated the nation- they had produ- Queen, however, were prudent enough ced a general stagnation of public and not to look so narrowly into these private business—and they had given particulars, but accepted this as a full a most favourable opportunity, were and triumphant acquittal. The mul- . it desired, to the enemies of internal titude indulged themselves without peace and tranquillity: They had reserve in their usual tumultuary betrayed their King, insulted their modes of displaying exultation. LonQueen, and had given a shock to the don was illuminated to a great exmorals of society by the promulga- tent during three successive nights. tion of the detestable and disgusting A prohibition to celebrate the event evidence, in the hearing of which the in Edinburgh in the same manner, House had been so long occupied. was revenged by the mob, by breakThe result had been, that, after in- ing every window in several of the quiries, secret and open-after the principal streets. Every city and grossest calumnies and the foulest li- township throughout the kingdom bels had been made the subject of de- had its jubilee. A new series of adtail and debate for 50 days—after all dresses was entered upon, in which the injury that it was possible to do her Majesty was congratulated on the the Queen had been accomplished, glorious issue of the proceedings the bill was abandoned, not without against her, and by which her innoreason, but assuredly without apology. cence was declared to have shone Lord Erskine expressed the delight forth brighter than noon-day. The he felt, that, after all that had been streets of the metropolis continued threatened and performed, he had yet covered with successive processions at length lived to see justice-tardy of lightermen, watermen, bricklayers, and reluctant justice-done to the glass-blowers, and other enlightenQueen. It was the victory of right and ed public bodies, proceeding to pay innocence over wrong and malignity. their homage at Brandenburgh House. The Duke of Montrose, on the other Her Majesty's procession to St Paul's hand, declared his unaltered convic- might be considered as the zenith of tion, that the charge had been proved, her triumph, after which this vast and and that he could never consider her continued tide of popularity began senas his Queen.

sibly to ebb. It was soon observed that The motion, that the bill be read the acquittal, as it was called, had this day six months, was then carried made no change in the feelings of the unanimously.

noble families of England, and that not The intelligence of this issue was a single female visitor of high rank had received by the great body of the in consequence swelled the court of people with unbounded rejoicings. Brandenburgh House. At the same Nothing, it is true, could be substan- time, sober men, attached to the extially less brilliant, or satisfactory to isting order of things, began to be

struck with alarm at the aspect which general professions of loyalty some famatters were assuming. The public tal clause, giving to the whole a chamind appeared to be in a ferment al-racter directly the reverse of what together unprecedented: the press had been contemplated. On these teemed with the most indecent per occasions, secession was often the resonal attacks on the head of the state; source of the original party; and at and the Queen, by placing herself at last it became the system to get on the head of the faction most eager foot two rival addresses, which were for innovation, appeared likely to give eagerly hawked about, and names, by it a new importance. This part of the every expedient, collected by their nation, which had hitherto viewed in supporters. In London a singular a sort of inert and paralyzed attitude phenomena took place ; the Court of the torrent of strange events, began Aldermen having presented an adnow to bestir itself. The course pur- dress replete with loyalty, while the sued was, to evade all mention of, or Common Council followed next day, opinion upon, recent proceedings, and with one which might be considered to confine themselves to general pro- as a personal insult on the Sovereign. fessions of loyalty, of attachment to in the English counties, bodies conhis Majesty's person, and of horror taining a large confusion of popular at the anarchical principles which elements, the struggles were eager, were now afloat. In the universities, and the events various. Upon the the Scotch county meetings, and other whole, however, a gradual change aristocratic and corporate bodies, re- took place in the public mind; the solutions of this tenor were carried enthusiasm in favour of one side of easily, and by great majorities. In the Royal House suffered a remarkthe towns, however, it usually hap- able abatement ; while the other, pened, after the sober and steady per- from being the object of perpetual sasons, whose presence was alone de- tire and lampoon, began to advance tosired, had taken their seats, that an wards that personal popularity which unbidden and unwished-for crowd soon after expressed itself so strongly, rushed in, and either negatived the and has ever since continued without proposed address, or appended to the abatement.

CHAPTER VIII. .

FRANCE.

Meeting of the ChambersState of Parties--Assassination of the Duke of

Berri-Law restraining individual Liberty-Law on the Press-Law of ElectionsViolent DisturbancesModification of the Law- It passes-Finances-Military Conspiracy-Minor Objects.

The French Legislative Chambers metally roused; personal enmities were suon the 29th November 1819. Every peradded to political contentions; and thing portended a stormy session, each threw himself farther into the exthough not storms so terrible as those treme of the party to which he had atwhich actually ensued. Hitherto the tached himself. Thus, at every elec system adopted by the King at his last tion, and in the course of every succesreturn to power had proceeded in a to. sive session, the opposite sides of the lerably smooth and successful tenor. Chamber gained continual accessions, His object had been to form a centre and pressed closer and closer upon the or middle

party between the fierce con- narrowing majority in the middle. It flicting elements of the ultra royalists became at length evident that this last on the one side, and the extreme liber. would soon lese almost all those who als on the other. Amid the lessons were attached to it from principle, and taught by recent events, and amid that would be confined to such as the inmoderation which usually sways public fluence of the Crown could command; bodies on their first entry upon their in short, that it would be converted functions, a considerable body in both into a minority. In this urgency, it Chambers were led on principle to was only by some bold and decisive approve and adopt this system. These measure that ministers could hope to members, joined to others who were preserve their political existence. The secured by the influence of the crown, course upon which they determined, enabled the ministry to maintain a stea- was one liable to manifest objections. dy, though somewhat narrow majority, It was no other than to introduce a over the two opposite sides, even when new principle of election, by which the they united against the centre as a com- nomination of the Chamber of Depumon enemy. Moderation, however, in ties should be thrown more into the political bodies, is a circumstance usual- hands of men of large property, who, ly of very ephemeral duration. In the it was expected, would adhere to the course of successive debate and conflict, existing administration. Without enthe passions on each side were continu. tering into the abstract merits of the

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