Reliques of Ancient English Poetry: Consisting of Old Heroic Ballads, Songs, and Other Pieces of Our Earlier Poets, Together with Some of Later Date, Volum 1

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Thomas Percy, J. V. Prichard
G. Bell and Sons, 1905
 

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Pàgina xxxviii - The shepherd swains shall dance and sing For thy delight each May morning: If these delights thy mind may move, Then live with me and be my love.
Pàgina 145 - FLORENCE OF WORCESTER'S Chronicle, with the Two Continuations : comprising Annals of English History from the Departure of the Romans to the Reign of Edward I.
Pàgina xxxix - A honey tongue, a heart of gall, Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall. Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten ; In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw, and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps, and amber studs, All these in me no means can move To come to thee, and be thy love.
Pàgina 142 - COMTE'S Positive Philosophy. Translated and condensed by Harriet Martineau. With Introduction by Frederic Harrison. 3 vols. S*. each. COMTE'S Philosophy of the Sciences, being an Exposition of the Principles of the Cours de Philosophic Positive.
Pàgina 22 - Andes' clifted side, Or by the Nile's coy source abide, Or, starting from your half-year's sleep, From Hecla view the thawing deep, Or, at the purple dawn of day, Tadmor's marble wastes survey ; You, recluse, again I woo, And again your steps pursue.
Pàgina li - Crabbed age and youth Cannot live together ; Youth is full of pleasance, Age is full of care: Youth like summer morn, Age like winter weather ; Youth like summer brave, Age like winter bare. Youth is full of sport, Age's breath is short, Youth is nimble, age is lame : Youth is hot and bold, Age is weak and cold ; Youth is wild, and age is tame.
Pàgina 14 - Who God doth late and early pray, More of his grace than gifts to lend, And entertains the harmless day, With a religious book or friend. This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise, or fear to fall ; Lord of himself, though not of lands, And having nothing, yet hath all.
Pàgina lxix - Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill: But their strong nerves at last must yield; They tame but one another still: Early or late They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath, When they, pale captives, creep to death. The garlands wither on your brow, Then boast no more your mighty deeds; Upon Death's purple altar now See, where the victor-victim bleeds: Your heads must come To the cold tomb; Only the actions of the just Smell sweet, and blossom...
Pàgina 140 - Ellis. 2 vols. 3^. 6d. each. BURN (R.) Ancient Rome and its Neighbourhood. An Illustrated Handbook to the Ruins in the City and the Campagna, for the use of Travellers. By Robert Burn, MA With numerous Illustrations, Maps, and Plans.
Pàgina xxxviii - With coral clasps and amber studs; And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my love.

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