Shakespere's Works, Volum 11

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Pàgina 113 - No more of that. I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice : then must you speak Of one that lov'd not wisely but too well ; Of one not easily jealous, but, being wrought, Perplex'd in the extreme ; of one whose hand, Like the base Indian, threw a pearl away Richer than all his tribe...
Pàgina 19 - Of hair-breadth scapes i' the imminent deadly breach; Of being taken by the insolent foe, And sold to slavery; of my redemption thence, And portance in my travels' history: Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, — such was the process; And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Pàgina 101 - 11 not shed her blood ; Nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow, And smooth as monumental alabaster, Yet she must die, else she '11 betray more men. Put out the light, and then put out the light : If I quench thee, thou flaming minister, I can again thy former light restore, Should I...
Pàgina 229 - Give me my robe, put on my crown ; I have Immortal longings in me ; now no more The juice of Egypt's grape shall moist this lip. Yare, yare, good Iras ; quick. Methinks I hear Antony call ; I see him rouse himself To praise my noble act ; I hear him mock The luck of Caesar, which the gods give men To excuse their after wrath : husband, I come : Now to that name my courage prove my title ! I am fire and air ; my other elements I give to baser life.
Pàgina 227 - Saucy lictors Will catch at us, like strumpets ; and scald rhymers Ballad us out o' tune : the quick comedians Extemporally will stage us, and present Our Alexandrian revels : Antony Shall be brought drunken forth, and I shall see Some squeaking Cleopatra boy my greatness I
Pàgina 145 - Now Antony must leave her utterly. Eno. Never ; he will not. Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale Her infinite variety : other women cloy The appetites they feed, but she makes hungry Where most she satisfies : for vilest things Become themselves- in her, that the holy priests Bless her when she is riggish.
Pàgina 47 - O thou invisible spirit of wine! if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil.
Pàgina 67 - Never, lago. Like to the Pontic sea, Whose icy current and compulsive course Ne'er feels retiring ebb, but keeps due on To the Propontic and the Hellespont ; Even so my bloody thoughts, with violent pace, Shall ne'er look back, ne'er ebb to humble love. Till that a capable and wide revenge Swallow them up. — Now, by yond marble heaven, In the due reverence of a sacred vow {Kneels, I here engage my words.
Pàgina 18 - I have ta'en away this old man's daughter, It is most true ; true, I have married her : The very head and front of my offending Hath this extent, no more. Rude am I in my speech, And little bless'd with the soft phrase of peace ; For since these arms of mine had seven years...
Pàgina 145 - ... seeming mermaid steers ; the silken tackle Swell with the touches of those flower-soft hands, That yarely frame the office. From the barge A strange, invisible perfume hits the sense Of the adjacent wharfs. The city cast Her people out upon her ; and Antony, Enthroned in the market-place, did sit alone, Whistling to the air ; which, but for vacancy, Had gone to gaze on Cleopatra too, And made a gap in nature.

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