Imatges de pÓgina
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to make sketches. He saves the young man's life twice, once the sea, and once by going to New York and nursing him through a fever, carrying him back to the seashore to recuperate. The artist wins a prize at the exhibition, and sells two of his pictures to a rich man who takes them not only for their art, but because he spent his childhood near Uncle William's home. This man is a friend of the artist's sweetheart, and he takes her to join her lover at Uncle William's. The old sailor hospitably divides his property with the rich man who puts up a house for himself and the young couple to live in.

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5. What is Uncle William's sweetheart, now? Tell about his love for it. 6. Give two examples of Uncle William's being shiftless and liking to be comfortable. Was he really shiftless, or only saying it about himself? Why do you think so?

7. Read one of the parts you like best.

Although a fairy tale, it is as much a story for grown-ups who can better grasp its allegorical meaning. The best fairy tales are always so. Much as we love them when we are children, we appreciate them, more when we are older. Delightful "Alice in Wonderland," and the beautiful child verses of Robert Louis Stevenson are good illustrations of this. Just as "The Sleeping Beauty" has been said to represent the Earth pricked into a long slumber by the frosty spindle of old Dame Winter, and awakened into glorious spring by the love-kiss of Prince Sun, so this tale

8. Read the last chapter.

9. Each individual has his own tastes in the things he reads as well as in the things he eats. And he has a perfect right to his own views. What is your personal opinion of this story? What other story of the same class have you read that you think not so good, and what other that you liked better?

10. Read the verses in the front of the book and then tell what they mean.

11. What does "who outfaces skies, outsings the storms" mean? Do you think it is true?

12. Do you think that Uncle William sang on the sunny side of his clouds. Why?

13. In this beautiful but rather difficult little bit of poetry which expressions do you think the prettiest?

14. Read the poem again..

15. Contrast the characters of Uncle William and Abner.

16. Give reasons why people should be cheerful.

FOR THE JUNIORS:

"THE KING OF THE GOLDEN RIVER."

shows how willing self-sacrifice comes back in good to the unselfish. The story is in two contrasting parts: part I, contained in the first chapter telling how the inheritance of the three brothers was laid waste (by South West Wind) on account of the cruelty of the two older brothers and part II, the rest of the book, showing how it was reclaimed through love by Gluck (A German work for happiness, or good fortune), the youngest. It is rather a departure for Ruskin to write a fairy tale, but it is characterized by the fine style for which he is noted.

1. Read the story. (It is so short that the best way of taking it up is to miss no part of it. A well-known literary man of Utah says he has read it twenty times for recreation, and will read it again. (One of the best ways of learning to write well is by reading well-written things.)

Girls who are chosen to read should be careful to be distinct so that the story will not be spoiled for others. If you enjoy what you read enough to get its meaning, you will never have any difficulty in reading ordinarly to be appreciated. One girl, or five different girls, may each read a chapter. Or one may state briefly the contents of chapter one, havin~ only the four other chapters read. The class leader must always use her own judgment as she should know which plan would interest her girls most.)

2. Who was Ruskin? What is an allegory?

3. Describe Treasure Valley.

Dr. Edward E. Hale, the distinguished Unitarian minister, who died on the 11th of June at his home in Boston, gave at one time a most thoughtful and scholarly lecture before the Harvard students on the Declaration of Independence. He closed his address with these inspiring words:

4. How was it lost?

5. How was it regained?

6. Describe the King of the Golden River.

7. Do you like or dislike the story. Why?

8. Read from "It was indeed a morning that might have made anyone happy" to "wreaths upon the morning wind."

"One hundred years ago, the Abbe Genty, a distinguished French scholar of that time, now long since forgotten, published an essay on the Result of the Discovery of America by Europe. At the very end of the paper he says, writing in 1792: 'The independence of the Anglo Americans is the event most likely to accelerate the revolution which is to renew the happiness of the world. In the bosom

9. What were the two Black Stones?

10. What good do you think selfsacrifice is?

Dr. Edward E. Hale on the Declaration

of Independence.

11. There are some people who sacrifice themselves foolishly. Give an example of what you think unnecessary sacrifice. (Have three girls answer this).

12. Read from "And Gluck climbed to the brink of the Golden River" to the end.

13. Tell some of the things Gluck did that proved him unselfish.

of this new nation are the true treasures which are to renew the world.' He names the relief to crowded Europe as one of the blessings which are to come to mankind. The Eman

cipation of Slaves, the End of Conquest, Universal Peace, the Conversion of the World to Christianity, are others. All these are to spring from the freedom, truth, honor, and, in general, virtue of three millions of Americans."

Then again does Dr. Hale impress this fact upon us, that:

"Not one of that noble band who pledged life, fortune, and honor to the support of American independence, ever fell from his high moral position before the world, or dimmed, by deed or word, that brilliant page of history on which their names are written."

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