Religion, Commerce, Liberty: A Record of a Time of Storm and Change, 1683-1793

Portada
Longmans, Green, 1925 - 391 pàgines

Des de l'interior del llibre

Què en diuen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Pàgines seleccionades

Continguts

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Passatges populars

Pàgina 166 - But every man, when he enters into society, gives up a part of his natural liberty, as the price of so valuable a purchase ; and in consideration of receiving the advantages of mutual commerce, obliges himself to conform to those laws, which the community has thought proper to establish.
Pàgina 211 - First, the duty of protecting the society from the violence and invasion of other independent societies ; secondly, the duty of protecting, as far as possible, every member of the society from the injustice or oppression of every other member of it, or the duty of establishing an exact administration of justice ; and, thirdly, the duty of erecting and maintaining certain public works and certain public institutions, which it can never be for the interest of any individual, or small number of individuals,...
Pàgina 43 - I heard the poor gentleman say his prayers last night, said the landlady, very devoutly, and with my own ears, or I could not have believed it. Are you sure of it ? replied the curate. A soldier, an' please your reverence, said I, prays as often (of his own accord) as a parson ; and when he is fighting for his king, and for his own life, and for his honour too, he has the most reason to pray to God of any one in the whole world. 'Twas well said of thee, Trim, said my uncle Toby. But when a soldier,...
Pàgina 96 - ... privately. After some modest refusals, he swore by G he would not let them in. Her grace, with a noble warmth, answered, by G they would come in in spite of the Chancellor and the whole House. This being reported, the Peers resolved to starve them out; an order was made that the doors should not be opened till they had raised their siege.
Pàgina 211 - ... According to the system of natural liberty, the sovereign has only three duties to attend to, three duties of great importance, indeed, but plain and intelligible to common understandings: first, the duty of protecting the society from the violence and invasion of other independent societies; secondly, the duty of protecting, as far as possible, every member of the society from the injustice or oppression of every other member of it...
Pàgina 213 - Parliament ; but he laughed at my offer, and said, that there was no such thing as a borough to be had now ; for that the rich East and West Indians had secured them all. at the rate of three thousand pounds at least; but many at four thousand; and two or three, that he knew, at five thousand.
Pàgina 166 - Political, therefore, or civil liberty, which is that of a member of society, is no other than natural liberty so far restrained by human laws (and no farther) as is necessary and expedient for the general advantage of the public.
Pàgina 2 - ... is subject, but the secret lets and difficulties, which in public proceedings are innumerable and inevitable, they have not ordinarily the judgment to consider. And because such as openly reprove supposed disorders of state are taken for principal friends to the common benefit of all, and for men that carry singular freedom of mind; under this fair and plausible colour whatsoever they utter passeth for good and current. 10 That which wanteth in the weight of their speech is supplied by the aptness...
Pàgina 245 - She had, except the commercial restraint, every characteristic mark of a free people in all her internal concerns. She had the image of the British Constitution. She had the substance. She was taxed by her own representatives. She chose most of her own magistrates. She paid them all. She hod, in effect, the sole disposal of her own internal government.
Pàgina 182 - I venture to say, it did so happen that persons had a single office divided between them who had never spoken to each other in their lives, until they found themselves, they knew not how, pigging together, heads and points, in the same truckle-bed.

Informació bibliogràfica