Imatges de pÓgina
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Southern District of New York, ss.

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the 1.fth day of May, A. D. 1822, in the 62d year of the Independence of the United States of America, G. & C. Car. vill, of the said District, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors in the words following, to wit: " The Philosophy of Human Knowledge, or a Treatise on Language.

Course of Lectures, delivered before the Utica Lyceum, by Alexander

Johnson." In conformity to the Act of ('ongress of the United States, entitled an Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the time therein mentioned," And also to an Act, entitled "an Act, supplementary to an Act, entitled an Act, for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints."

F. J. BETTS.
Clerk of the Southern District of New York.

...128

Page mises, he will so explain the premises us to show that! they do embrace his conclusion..Proots and argumenu have no eficacy bat to show that the promises

admit the conclusion. LECTURE VII.....

...121 or the necessities of language. When we say the whole

of an orange is greater than a part, the necensity of ad

mitting the conclusion is founded on our experience. LECTURE VIII.......

The necessities of language continued. When proposi

tions have thus obtained an authoritative character, we
apply them where there are no corresponding phenome-
na : this is one of the most subtle delusions to which

language exposes'us. LECTURE IX......

.....145 The necessities of language concluded. --In such applica

tions, the necessity of admitting the conclusions is
merely verbal, and therefore fallacious.—This error

enters deeply into nearly all our learning. LECTURE X. ...

.....159 Theorists are solicitous about names and definitions, be

cause speculations are often verbal deductions from · names. The error of this process is, that words have as many significations as they have applications to different phenomena : consequently, though the assertion is true (when applied to an artificial sphere) that no part of the circumference is a straight line ; yet the assertion is sophistical when the word sphere is applied to the earth; because sphere has then a different signification. If we employ language to simply refer to phenomena, no serious evil can arise from the terms we adopt; bnt if we select words to draw from them logical deductions, the slightest change of phraseology may produce in philosophy revolutions which no man can foresee.

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iut on objects produced by art. The animals which 18titute his food are unknown to nature, while trees, s, and herbs are the trophies of his labour. His virlanguage, actions, sentiments, and desires are nearactitious. Stupendous in achievement, he is bound

attempts. Having subdued the surface of the OF

would explore its centre; having vanquished

would subdue death. Unsatisfied with reishably the past, he would anticipate the anted with subjugating the ocean, he

air. Success seems but to sharpen ‘lity augments his impatience. tant to know the extent of our zipate strength in designs for d; or attempt practicabi

This knowledge is the

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mises, he will so explain the premises us to show that they do embrace his conclusions-Proots and argue menu have no efficacy bat to show that the promise

admit the conclusion. LECTURE VII.....

or the necessities of language.When we say the

of an orange is greater thạo a part, the necedir

mitting the conclusion is founded on our exp LECTURE VIIL.......

The necessities of language continued.

tions have thus obtained an authoritas'
apply them where there are no cor
na : this is one of the most s

virong inclination for language exposes'us.

-bas diminished my conLECTURE IX........

d the ardour which, at my The necessities of langupolitical discussions ;-vocife

tions, the necessignts not invaded, and vindictive merely verbalağs not inflicted. It has driven mo

enters deeg of the counting-house, and the war of LECTUP

s, to an unambitious avocation; which, whilst T

is the conveniences that our plainness renders esjal, cnables me to gratify my unenviable propensity. Among the results is a Treatise on the Philosophy of IIuman Knowledge. From the obscurity in which my life has passed, I have reason to suspect an absence, rather than the possession, of instructive talents: hence the Treatise has long lain unregarded, and, till within a few days, undivulged. An accidental intimation of its cxistence, has produced from the Lyceum a request with which I shall endeavour to comply, by moulding the Treatise into short and occasional lectures.

Man exists in a world of his own crcation. He cannot step, but on ground transformed by culture ; nor look,

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