Imatges de pÓgina
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In peace, there's nothing so becomes a man,
As modest stillness and humility :
But when the blast of war blows in our earsy
Then imitate the action of tigers;
Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood;
Disguise fair nature with hard-favonr'd rage:
Then lend the eye a terrible aspect;
Let it pry through the portage of the head,
Like brass cannon; let the brow o'erwhelm it,
As fearfully, as doth a galled rock
O'erhang and jutty his confounded base,
Swill'd with the wild and wasteful ocean.
Now set the teeth, and stretch the nostrił wide;
Hold hard the breath, and bend up every spirit
To its full height !On, on, you noble English,
Whose blood is set from fatirers of war proof!
Fathers, that, like so many Alexanders,
Have, in these parts, from morn till even fought,
And sheath'd their swords for lack of argument.
Dishonour not your mothers; now attest;
That those whom you call'd fathers, did beget you.
Be copy now to men of grosser blood,
And teach them how to war!- And you, good yeomen,
Whose limbs were made in England, shew us here
The mettle of your pasture; let us swear
That you are worth your breeding : which I doubt noti
For there is none of you so mean and base,
That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.
I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips;
Straining, upon the start. The game's afoot:
Follow your spirit; and upon this charge,
Cry-God for llarry! England'! and Saint George!

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IV. Duke of Vienną to Angelo, inculcating publio

virtue.

ANGELO,
There is a kind of character in thy life,
That, to the observer, doth thy history
Fully wifold. Thyself and thy belongings
Are not thing own so proper, as to waste

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Thyself upon thy virtues, them on thee.
Hearen doth with us, as we with torches do ;
Not light them for themselves: for if our virtues
Did not go forth with us, 'twere all alike
As if we had theny not. Spirits are not finely touchid,
But to fine issues: nor nature ever lends
The smallest scruple of her excellence,
But, like a thrifty goddess, she determines
Herself the glory of a creditor,
Both thanks and use.

But I do bend my speech
To one that can' my part in him.advertise:
Hold, therefore, Angelo.
In our remove be thou at full ourself:
Mortality and merėy in Vienna
Live in thy tongue and heart. Old Escalusy
Though first in question, is thy secondary,
Take thy commission.

V. The Bishop of Carlisle dissuading the deposir

tion of king Rëchard, and the crowning of Bolinga broke,

Worst in this royal' presence may I speak,
Yet best beseeming me to speak the truth.
Would God, that any in this noble presences !
Were enough noble to be upright judge
Of noble Richard; thien truc nobleness would.
Teach him forbearance from so foul a wrong.
What subject can give sentence on his king?!
And who sit's here that is not Ricliard's subjekt?!
Thieves are not judg'd, but they are by to lear's
Althcugh apparent guilt be seen in them :
And shall the figure of God's majesty,
His captain, steward, deputy elect,
Anointed, crowned, planted many years,
Be judg'd by subject and inferior breath,
And he himself not present? O, forbid it, Gody
That in a christian climate, souls: refind.
Should shew so heinous, black, obscene a deed!
I speak to subjects, and a subject speaks,
Stirr'd up by heaven, thus boldly for bis king.

My lord Hereford here, whom you call king,
Is a fouł traitor to proud flereford's king :
And if you crown him, let me prophesy:-
The blood of English shall manure the ground,
And future ages groan for this foul act:
Peace shall go sleep with Turks and infidels,
And, in this seat of peace, tumultuous wars
Shall kin with kin and kind with kind confound;
Disorder, horror, fear, and mutiny,
Shall here inhabit, and this land be call'd.
The field of Golgotha and dead men's sculls,
O, if you rear this house against this house,
It will the woefullest division prove,
That ever fell upon this cursed earth :
Prevent, resist it, let it not be so,
Lest children's children cry against you love!

VI. Volumnia exhorting her son Coriolanus, to sooth

and please the Plebeians.

PRAY, be counsel'd :
I have a heart as little apt as yours,
But yet a brain, that leads my use of anger.
To better vantage.

You are too absolute :
Though therein you can never be too noble.
But when extremities speak, I have heard you say,
Honour and policy, like unsever'd friends,
I' the war do grow together: grant that, and tell me,
In peace, what each of them by the other lose,..
That they combine not there?
If it be honour, in your wars, to seem
The same you are not, (which for your best ends,
You adopt as policy,) how is it less, or worse,
That it shall hold companionship in peace
With honour; as in war; since that to both
It stands in like request ?:

Now it lies with you to speak to the people: Not by your own instruction, nor by the matter Which your heart prompts you to; but with such words

That are but roasted on your tongue, but bastards and

syllables Of do allowance to your bosom's truth. Now this no more dishonours you at all, Than to take in a town with gentle words, Which else would put you to your fortune, and The hazard of much blood.I wonld dissemble with my nature, where My fortunes and my friends, at stake, required I should do so in honour: I am in this, Your wife, your son, these, senators, the nobles : And you will rather shew our general lowts How you can frown, than spend a fawn upon them For the inheritance of their loves, and safeguard Of what that want might ruin. I pr’ythee now, my son, Go to them, with this bonnet in thy hand; And thus far having stretch'd it, (here be with them,) Thy knee bussing the stone, (for in such business Action is eloqnence, and the eyes of the ignorant More learned than the ears,) waving thy head, With often thus correcting thy stout heart, Now humble as the ripest mulberry, That will not hold the handling : or say to them, Thou art their soldier, and being bred in broils, Hlast not the soft way, which thou dost confess Were fit for thee to use, as they to claim, In asking their good loves : but thou wilt frame Thyself, forsooth, hereafter theirs, so far As thou hast power and person.

Prythec now, Go, and be ruld: although I know, thou hadst rather Follow thine enemy in a tiery gall, Than flatter him in a bower.

VII. The Prince of Verona exhorting old Capulet and

Montague to restore the peace, REBELLIOƯs subjects, enemies to peace, Prophaners of this neighbour-stained steel, Will they not hear what ho! you men, you beasts,

That quench the fire of your pernicious ragb
With purple fountains issuing from your veins
On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
And hear the sentence of your moved prince.
Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word,
By thce, old Capulet, and Montague,
Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets;
And made Verona's ancient citizens
Cast up their grave beseeming ornaments,
To wield ola partisans, in hands as old,
Canker'd with peace, to part your çanker'd hates
If ever you disturb our streets again,
Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.
For this time, all the rest depart away:
You, Capulet, shall go along * ath me;
And Montague, come you this afternoon,
To know our further pleasure in this case,
To old Free town, our common judgment-place.
Once more on pain of death, all men depart.

VIII. Jolsey's advice to Cromwell, how to rise witha

out ambition.

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CROMWELL, I did not think to shed a tear In all my miseries, but thou hast forc'd me, Out of thy honest;truth, to play the woman, Let's dry our eyes. And thus far bear me, Cromwell; And, when I am forgotten, as I shall be; And sleep in dull cold marble, where no mention Of me more must be heard of, --say, I taught thee, Say Wolsey,--that once trod the ways of glory, And sounded all the depths and shoals of honour Found thee a way, out of his reek, to rise in ; A sure and safe one, though thy master miss'd its Mark but my fall, and that that ruin'd me. Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition; By that sin fell the angels, how can man then, The image of his maker, hope to win by 't? Love thyself last: 'cherish those hearts that hate thees' Corruption wins not more than honesty.

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