Imatges de pÓgina
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p. 416.

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reason. If Othello had ordered the removal of Montano, he would have said, not "Lead him off," but "Lead him away." We speak of a man's being or having been led off, or on, in the sense of away, or onward; but when we direct a man to be taken from where we are, we say away,' unless we are upon a staging, or some place of that kind, which, for Shakespeare's purposes, Othello was not. The rhythm of this command, too, is not like that of Shakespeare's hemistichs. But as folio and 4to. unite in the reading in question, I do not venture to change it upon mere opinion.

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there is more sense in that, than in reputation":- So the folio, which prints "fence;" the 4to., "there is more offence." It is quite possible that either may be a misprint; but the sense of the folio reading seems much the better.

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officer":

with so slight, so drunken, and so indiscreet an - So the folio; the 4to., "with so light," &c. may be drunk at a time, man": So the folio; the 4to., "at some time," &c. I suspect that the author wrote, at one time.'

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importune her help to put you," &c. So the folio; the 4to., " importune her; and she'll help," &c. and denotement of her parts," &c. : - The old copies have "the devotement," &c.; the slight error having doubtless resulted from the occurrence of 'devote' just before.

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In troth 'tis morning," : - The 4to. has, " By th' mass 'tis morning." The change seems to be due rather to a care for the rhythm of the line than to the scruples of the Master of the Revels.

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Myself, the while":- Folio and 4to. have," Myself a while," which Theobald corrected.

ACT THIRD.

SCENE I.

[Do, my good friend]". - These words are omitted from the folio.

"[To take the saf'st occasion by the front]": - This line is found in the 4to., but not in the folio.

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p. 423.

P. 424.

p. 426.

SCENE III.

"As if the case were his ":- - The folio misprints, "As if the cause were his."

"I'll watch him tame":—See the Note on "you must be watch'd ere you are made tame, must you?" Troilus and Cressida, Act III. Sc. 2.

"Not now, sweet Desdemon":- The folio has here and in several other places "Desdemon," instead of 'Desdemona ;' and as the modification of the name always preserves the rhythm, there can be no doubt that it is intentional.

"By Heaven, he echoes me" : - Thus the 4to.; the folio, "Alas, he echoes me;" the difference being doubtless due to the interference of the Master of the Revels. p. 427. They're close delations":— i. e., subtle,. intimate confessions or informations.

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"I am not bound to that all slaves are free to":· So the 4to. The folio omits the latter to,' and, what is of little significance, places a colon after that.'

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and of my jealousy

Shape faults that are not":-The folio has,

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The latter reading may be genuine; but it would rather seem that Iago means that it was his nature's plague to spy into abuses, and of his jealousy to shape faults that are not. The reading of the text was first suggested in Shakespeare's Scholar.

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that your wisdom [yet]":- The folio omits 'yet,' which, necessary to the completion of the line, is found in the 4to.

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which not enriches him": Were it not that this quite unexceptionable reading is found in both 4to. and folio I should be inclined to regard "not as a phonetic misprint of naught.'

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"It is the green-ey'd monster which doth mock The meat it feeds on":- To leave this passage without a note would be to surprise and perhaps to disappoint the reader. Yet small explanation is needed of the asser

p. 429.

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p. 432.

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tion that jealousy is fed by the objects of its open scorn and derision. For we all know, as well as Iago, that the green-eyed monster is like Pistol, and if it "can mock a leek," it "can eat a leek." Hanmer read, "which doth make the meat," &c. - an extremely plausible conjecture; because jealousy lives upon its own unfounded suspicions, and because the supposed typographical error might so easily have been made. Had the original text read 'make' there could have been no question as to its soundness. But both folio and 4to. have, which doth mocke." The curious reader will find five pages of comment upon this passage in the Variorum of 1821.

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suspects, yet fondly loves": - The folio, "suspects yet soundly loves." But I cannot hesitate, on looking at the whole line, to believe that foundly' is a misprint for fondly.' True, Henry V. says to Katharine, If you will love me soundly with your French heart;' but the sentiment and the occasion of the two passages are entirely dissimilar. This correction is found in both Mr. Collier's and Mr. Singer's copies of the folio of 1632. The 4to. has, "yet strongly loues."

"Is [once] to be resolv'd": -The 4to. has, but the folio has not, once.' A syllable is needed for the verse, and the omission seems doubtless accidental.

"and dances [well"]: :- Well' is in the same predicament in this passage as once' in that last noticed. "And knows all qualities," &c.:-The folio misprints all quantities."

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If I do prove her haggard":-i. e., unreclaimed, wanton. So, though the fawlcon be reclaimed to the fist, shee retireth to her haggard-ness." Euphues, Sig. B iv. b. Ed. 1597.

Yet, 'tis the plague of great ones": misprints, "to great ones."

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p. 434.

O, then Heaven mocks itself": prints, "mock'd itself."

- The folio

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"The Moor already changes," &c. :-This line is omitted from the 4to.

p. 436. “O Heaven forgive me!”— The 4to., “O Heaven defend me!"

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p. 437.

her name, that was as fresh": - The folio, unaccountably, my name," &c.

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"Would you, the supervisor," &c. :- The folio misprints, "the supervision.”

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you may have 't":-The folio, "you might hav't."

p. 437.

p. 438.

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and sigh'd, and kiss'd": - So the 4to. The folio misprints, "and sigh and kisse."

"or any that was hers": - Folio and 4to. have, "or any it was hers" - an error obviously resulting from the mistaking of 'y' for yt,' and which Malone corrected.

from the hollow Hell":- The 4to., "from thy hollow Cell," which is generally preferred.

O, blood, blood, blood": blood, lago, blood."

The 4to. has, "O

"Neu'r

"Ne'er knows retiring ebb": - The folio, keepes retiring ebb, but keeps due on," &c., where we may attribute the first 'keepes' to the presence of the second, and the error would be likelier to occur if the former took the place of a word beginning also with k. A 4to. of 1630 has, "Ne'er feels retiring ebb," which I cannot but regard as a mere sophistication.

SCENE IV.

p. 440. "To tell you where he lodges," &c. :-This speech and the reply to it are not in the 4to.

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p. 441.

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p. 442.

P. 444.

p. 446.

"Where should I lose the handkerchief, Emilia?" The 4to., with a loss of significance, has, 66 that handkerchief." But to Desdemona this handkerchief was at any time the handkerchief, and now more so than ever. Farther on in this Scene, too, the 4to. makes Othello say, Fetch me that handkerchief;" but the folio again uses the definite article.

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"Full of crusadoes":- A crusado was a Portuguese silver coin, stamped with a cross, and of variable value.

"But our new heraldry is hands, not hearts": - In 1611 King James instituted an order of pseudo-nobility, the baronetage. The baronets contributed a thousand pounds toward the expense of maintaining British rule in Ulster, Ireland, and in return received their title, and the addition of the arms of Ulster, on a canton, to their paternal bearings.

"I have a salt and sorry rheum," &c. : "and sullen rheum."

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-The 4to.,

Why, so I can, sir": - The folio omits sir.'

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and is he angry?". The 4to., repeating what is said above," and can he be angry?"

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Take me this work out":—i. e., copy it. We still take off,' to mean copy in an exaggerated style.

p. 446.

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"Why, I pray you?" This question and the reply, which are necessary to the continuity of the passage, are not in the 4to.

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if I shall see you soon at night" :- See the Note on "we'll have a posset for it soon at night," Merry Wives of Windsor, Act I. Sc. 4.

P. 448.

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p. 450.

ACT FOURTH.

SCENE I.

"As doth the raven o'er th' infected house": - The folio has, "the infectious house."

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We say, lie on her":- Here 'on' is used for 'of.'

To confess," &c.: The rest of this speech is omitted from the 4to.

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[No, forbear]": - - These words are omitted from the folio, accidentally, we may be sure.

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in those unproper beds":-i. e., beds which really do not pertain to themselves alone.

"Confine yourself but in a patient list" :— i. e., within such bounds of patience. The lists within which tournaments took place were the bounds of the knight's career.

p. 451. "Faith, the cry goes": -The folio, "Why, the cry goes;" and in Othello's second speech below, it misprints, Iago becomes me," and in Cassio's succeeding speech it omits, by this hand."

p. 452.

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"so hales and pulls me :- -The folio, which is carelessly printed here, "so shakes and pulls me."

p. 453. "[0,] a thousand thousand times": - The folio omits "O.

p. 454.

p. 455.

p. 456.

"Something from Venice":- For this line and the succeeding one, the folio has the following mutilated speech:

"I warrant, something from Venice:

'Tis Lodovico this comes from the Duke

See your wife's with him."

"T' atone them": i. e., to reconcile them. See the Note on "Atone together," As You Like It, Act V. Sc. 4, p. 384.

661 Is this the nature": The 4to., with a poor repetition, This the noble nature."

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