Pebbles, Pearls and Gems of the Orient

Portada
G. H. Ellis, 1882 - 238 pàgines
 

Què opinen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Passatges populars

Pàgina 205 - There was the Door to which I found no Key; There was the Veil through which I could not see: Some little talk awhile of Me and Thee There was — and then no more of Thee and Me.
Pàgina 118 - Is there one word which may serve as a rule of practice for all one's life?" The Master said, "Is not RECIPROCITY such a word? What you do not want done to yourself, do not do to others.
Pàgina 123 - Learn from yon orient shell to love thy foe, And store with pearls the hand that brings thee woe : Free, like yon rock, from base vindictive pride, Emblaze with gems the wrist that rends thy side : Mark where yon tree rewards the stony shower With fruit nectareous, or the balmy flower : All Nature calls aloud — " Shall man do less Than heal the smiter, and the railer bless ?
Pàgina 206 - Strange, is it not? that of the myriads who Before us pass'd the door of Darkness through, Not one returns to tell us of the Road, ' "* Which to discover we must travel too.
Pàgina 205 - The Worldly Hope men set their Hearts upon Turns Ashes — or it prospers; and anon, Like Snow upon the Desert's dusty Face, Lighting a little hour or two — is gone.
Pàgina 206 - I sent my Soul through the Invisible, Some letter of that After-life to spell: And by and by my Soul returned to me, And answered "I Myself am Heaven and Hell...
Pàgina 191 - Where one sees nothing else, hears nothing else, understands nothing else, that is the Infinite. Where one sees something else, hears something else, understands something else, that is the finite. The Infinite is immortal, the finite is mortal.
Pàgina 205 - Ah, my Beloved, fill the Cup that clears To-day of past Regrets and future Fears : To-morrow! — Why, To-morrow I may be Myself with Yesterday's Sev'n thousand Years.
Pàgina 109 - Shine for us with thy best rays, thou bright Dawn, thou who lengthenest our life, thou the love of all, who givest us food, who givest us wealth in cows, horses, and chariots. Thou, daughter of the sky, thou, high born Dawn, whom the Vasishthas magnify with songs, give us riches high and wide...
Pàgina 199 - On parent knees, a naked new-born child Weeping thou sat'st while all around thee smiled ; So live, that sinking in thy last long sleep, Calm thou mayst smile, while all around thee weep.

Informació bibliogràfica