Imatges de pàgina
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iVh A PARLEMENT." 563

: ' loude as I may crie :" m this songe ful hye, . .// that be to love untrewe." she hadde songen hit out to the

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■ irewel," quoch she, "for I moste ende, —

. ;d of Love, that can ryght wel and may, ckil joy sende yow this day,

- ever yet he eny lover sende!"

Thus toke the nyghtyngale hir leve of me.
I pray to God he alway with her be,
And joy of love he sende her evermore,
And shilde us fro the cukkow and his lore,
For ther is non so fals a bridde as he. 260

Forthe she fley, the gentil nyghtyngale,
To alle the briddes that werene in the dale,
And gat hem alle into a place yn fere,
And hem besoughten that they wolden here
Her dysese, and thus began her tale.

"Ye knowe wel, hit is not fro yow hidde,
How that the cukkow and I fast have chidde,
Ever sithe that hit was dayes lyght;
I prey yow alle that ye do me ryght
Of that foule fals, unkynde bridde." 270

Then spake oon brid for al, by oon assent: "This mater asketh good avysement; For we be fewe briddes her in fere, And soth hit ys, the cukkow is not here, \nd therfore we wol have a parlement.

He seyde, "Farewel, farewel, papyngay!"
As thogh be bad iscorned, as thoght me;
But ay I hunted him fro tre to tre,
TiUe he was fer al out of syght away.

And then come the nyghtyngale to me,
And seyde, " Frende, forsoth I thanke the,
That thou hast lyked me thus to rescowe;
And oon avowe to love I wol allowe,
That al this May I wol thy singer be." 230

I thanked her, and was ryght wel apayed: "Yee," quoth she, "and be thou not amayed, Thogh thou have herde the cukkow er then me , For, if I lyve, hit shal amended be The nexte May, yf I be not affrayed.1

"And oon thing I wol rede the also, Ne leve 2 thou not the cukkow, loves fo, For al that he hath seyde is strong lesinge." "Nay, nay," quoth I, "ther shal nothing me bringe

Fro love, and yet he doth me mekil wo." 240 "Yee? Use thou," quoth she, " this medecyne,

Every day this May er that thou dyne, — Goo loke upon the fresshe flour the daysye, And, thogh thou be for wo in poynt to dye, That shal ful gretly lyssen * the of thy pyne. "And loke alwey that thou be good and trewe,

And I wol singe oon of my songes newe

1 Alarmed. • Before. • Lcskd.

"WE WOL HAVE A PARLEMENT." 563

For love of the, as loude as I may crie :"
And then she began this songe ful hye,
"/ shrewe hem al that be to love uutrewe."
And when she hadde songen hit out to the

ende, 251 "Now fairewel," quoth she, "for I moste

wende, —

And god of Love, that can ryght wel and may,
As mekil joy sende yow this day,
As ever yet he eny lover sende!"

Thus toke the nyghtyngale hir leve of me.
I pray to God he alway with her be,
And joy of love he sende her evermore,
And shilde us fro the cukkow and his lore,
For ther is non so fals a bridde as he. 260

Forthe she fley, the gentil nyghtyngale,
To alle the briddes that werene in the dale,
And gat hem alle into a place yn fere,
And hem besoughten that they wolden here
Her dysese, and thus began her tale.

"Ye knowe wel, hit is not fro yow hidde,
How that the cukkow and I fast have chidde,
Ever sithe that hit was dayes lyght;
I prey yow alle that ye do me ryght
Of that foule fals, unkynde bridde." 270

Then spake oon brid for al, by oon assent: "This mater asketh good avysement; For we be fewe briddes her in fere, And soth hit ys, the cukkow is not here, \nd therfore we wol have a parlemenL

"And therat shal the egle be, our lorde, And other perys 1 that ben of recorde, And the cukkow shal be after ysent; And ther shal be geven the jugement, Or elles we shul make summe acorde. 280

"And this shal be, withouten any nay, The morowe, Seynte Valentynes day, Under the maple that is feire and grene, Before the chambre window of the Quene, At Wodestok upon the grene lay."2

She thanked hem, and then her leve she toke,

And fleye into an hawthorne by the broke,
And ther she sate and songe upon the tre,
"Terme of my lyve love hath withholde me,"
So loude that I with that song awoke. 290

0 lewde boke, with thy foule rudenesse, Sith thou hast neyther beaute ne eloquence, Who hath the caused or geve the hardynesse For to appere in my ladyes presence? I am ful siker * thou knowest hyr benivolence, Ful agreable to alle hir obeyinge, For of al goode she is the beste lyvynge.

Alas! that thou ne haddest worthynesse, To shewe to hir somme plesaunt sentence, Sithen that she hath, thorgh hir getrilesse, 300 \cceptede the servant to hir digne reviJfence I

1 Peers. 1 Grass land, lawn. 'Sure.

A GOODLY BALLADE OF CHAUCKK. 565

0! me repenteth that I ne hadde science, And leyser als, to make the more florysshynge, For of al goode she ys the beste lyvynge.

Beseche hir mekely with alle lowlynesse, Though I be ferre from hir in absence, To thenke on my trouthe and stidfastnesse, And to abregge of my sorwes the violence, Whiche caused ys, wherof knoweth your sapience,

She lyke1 amonge to notefye me hir lykynge; For of alle goode she is the beste lyvynge. 311

Lenvoye.

Aurore of gladnesse, and day of lustynesse, Lucernes a nyght with hevenly influence Enlumyned, rote of beaute and goodenesse, Suspiries* which I effunde4 in silence! Of grace, I beseche, alegge let your writynge Now of al goode, syth ye be beste lyvynge.

A GOODLY BALLADE OF CHAUCER.

Mother of norture, best beloved of alle. And fresshest flour, to whom good thrift God sende!

Your childe, if it lust you me so to calle,
Al be I unable my selfe so to pretende,

• May plate. • Lamp. • Sigh; 4 Pour out.

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