His Marriage Vow

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Lee and Shepard, 1874 - 328 pàgines
 

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Pàgina 141 - As when in heaven the stars about the moon Look beautiful, when all the winds are laid, And every height comes out, and jutting peak And valley, and the immeasurable heavens Break open to their highest, and all the stars Shine, and the Shepherd gladdens in his heart...
Pàgina 301 - Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low : and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain. And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together ; for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it.
Pàgina 249 - What covered all ? what sheltered ? what concealed ? Was it the water's fathomless abyss ? There was not death — yet was there nought immortal. There was no confine betwixt day and night ; The only One breathed breathless by itself. Other than It there nothing since has been. Darkness there was, and all at first was veiled In gloom profound — an ocean without light...
Pàgina 128 - If we take in our hand any volume; of divinity or school metaphysics, for instance; let us ask: Does it contain any abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number? No. Does it contain any experimental reasoning concerning matter of fact or existence? No. Commit it then to the flames; for it can contain nothing but sophistry and illusion.
Pàgina 252 - On the contrary, it is very conceivable that catastrophes may be part and parcel of uniformity. Let me illustrate my case by analogy. The working of a clock is a model of uniform action ; good time-keeping means uniformity of action. But the striking of the clock is essentially a catastrophe ; the hammer might be made to blow up a barrel of gunpowder, or turn on a deluge of water ; and, by proper arrangement...
Pàgina 63 - Tis past mid-day. Exhausted by the heat, The peacock plunges in the scanty pool That feeds the tall tree's root ; the drowsy bee Sleeps in the hollow chamber of the lotus, Darkened with closing petals; on the brink Of the now tepid lake the wild duck lurks Amongst the sedgy shade ; and even here The parrot from his wiry bower complains, And calls for water to allay his thirst.
Pàgina 249 - ! who proclaimed it here, Whence, whence this manifold creation sprang'' The Gods themselves came later into being — Who knows from whence this great creation sprang • He from whom all this great creation came, Whether His will created or was mute, The Most High Seer that is in highest heaven, He knows it — or perchance even he knows not.
Pàgina 249 - Was it the water's fathomless abyss? There was not death — yet there was nought immortal. There was no confine betwixt day and night; The only One breathed breathless by itself, Other than It there nothing since has been. Darkness there was, and all at first was veiled In gloom profound — an ocean without light — The germ that still lay covered in the husk Burst forth, one nature, from the fervent heat.
Pàgina 252 - ... time-keeping means uniformity of action. But the striking of the clock is essentially a catastrophe ; the hammer might be made to blow up a barrel of gunpowder, or turn on a deluge of water ; and, by proper arrangement, the clock, instead of marking the hours, might strike at all sorts of irregular intervals, never twice alike in the intervals, force, or number of its blows.
Pàgina 317 - No created being or object that has been or may hereafter be worshipped by any sect shall be ridiculed or contemned in the course of the Divine service to be conducted here. No book shall be acknowledged or revered as the infallible word of God; yet no book which has been or may hereafter be acknowledged by any sect to be infallible, shall be ridiculed or contemned.

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