Foliorum centuriae, selections for translation into Latin and Greek prose, by H.A. Holden

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Hubert Ashton Holden
1864
 

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Continguts

Spectator
37
Perkin Warbecks proclamation
39
Thirlwall
42
Letter
45
Reign of Augustus
47
8o The two Antonines
51
Letter
57
Philosophy its work
63
II3 Difference between Thucydides and Xenophon
70
Pragmatical meddling with other mens matters R South
73
S Johnson
76
The force of custom in regard to a future life 7 Addison
86
147
92
Certain imputations against learning
99
Visit to the site of the mansion of Cornelia
105
200
111
Lord Digby revealing himself to Sir John Hotham Lord Clarendon
114
Intellect of Adam in Paradise
117
201
123
Expectation
130
T Arnold
134
Profligacy of politicians in the reign of Charles II Lord Macaulay
136
Do as you would be done
142
T Burnet
145
Antiquity of the Jews a great prerogative
148
Fortune mistaken notions concerning her Sir T Browne 249 Constantine the Greathis vast prodigality E Gibbon 250 Gradual development of the Eng...
153
Introduction to the apology for Smectymnus 7 Milton 255 Henry VIII and the Emperor Charles V
157
175
158
Queen Elizabeth and Mary Queen of Scots G Buchanan 258 The desire of communicating knowledge H Mackenzie
160
The Emperor Julianhis initiation and fanaticism E Gibbon 260 Considerations on death 7 Taylor
161
Character of King Charles I
162
Preference of the right hand natural to man Sir C Bell 263 Character of Queen Elizabeth
163
Hume
164
Atheiststheir foolish credulity concerning atòms R Bentley 265 Letter to Romilly on Fontenelle Mirabeau
165
English taste for the Italian opera 7 Addison 267 Twofold type of character common among
166
W Paley 268 William the Third coldness of his manners
167
Lord Macaulay 269 Trial of Algernon Sydney A D 1683
168
The reduction of Veii by M Furius Camillus B G Niebuhr 272 Character of the Spanish inquisition
169
W H Prescott 273 Paramount value of goad counsellors to princes B Jonson 274 Character of King Charles I
170
H Hallam
171
Talent of ridicule in the possession of an illcondi
176
Lord Bacon
183
W Shakespeare
189
320
198
331
204
342
210
Pompey the Greathis miserable death
216
Knowledge of first principles how attained
222
Harris
224
372
228
T Gray
234
A field of battle described
238
G Berkeley
242
Character
244
Cromwell and the title of King
246
Disadvantages of an exalted reputation
251
419
257
The Sienese and Charles V and Cosmo De Medici w Robertson
263
437
269
Operations before the battle of Floddenfield Lord Herbert
275
Prospect of deathpleasure ofto the righteous
276
Preparation for death
277
Eagerness for emigration in America W Robertson
278
Character of an hyperbolical fop by Seneca A Cowley
279
2802 Devastation of the Carnatic by Hyder Ali Khan E Burke
280
Qualification of women for rule
281
Sorrow
282
Eloquence how it differs from the other fine arts
283
Christians ought to live as they would
284
The Gonfaloniere di Justicia at Florence H Hallam
285
Riches are unable to confer real happiness
287
Nature and situation of the castle of Dumbarton G Buchanan
288
An Africans speech B Franklin
289
2go Warren Hastings brought to the Bar of the House Lord Macaulay 291 Virgilhis Æneid and its defects B G Niebuhr
291
W Cowper
292
Advice to those living in bondage to the world
293
Sympathetic revenge a duty E Burke
294
The true test of a good government Junius
295
Deliberations of the seven Magians
296
The wisest men think for themselves
297
Mans happiness regulated by his own behaviour 7 Butler
298
Benefits of truthfulness Spectator
299
Advice to Prince Henry Frederick Sir W Ralegh
300
Lord Bacon his demeanour at his impeachment E Burke
301
Effects of usurious transactions in the Carnatic E Burke Prudence cannot always command success Spectator
302
The Earls of Lanrick and Lautherdale Lord Clarendon
304
Justice is slowinjury quick and rapid E Burke
305
Plato his illustrations of moral instruction 7 Mackintosh
306
Augustus Cæsarcharacter of his sovereignty C Merivale
307
Every mans business is no mans
316
Story of Percennius and Vibulenus
318
Cromwell
324
T Arnold
326
Beneficia
330
Passages for Translation into Greek Prose 1 397
332
A Dacier
335
Laws about trade in foreign corn
338
Of the pursuit of happiness
339
Mustaphas Death
344
Original rights of man in civil society
345
The Divine economy
350
40
351
536
354
Man and the lower animals
356
The earliest poetry of a nation the best
357
E Burke
360
King Charles II
363
Analogy in the transmission of government
366
The conduct of the ministry
369
177
370
Speech of a citizen of Lucca to the people
375
E Burke
379
94
381
Prevalent fashion of censuring public officers
385
Letter to f Monck Mason concerning w
387
B Jonson
391
The law of Solon Plutarch
392
The victory of faith 7 C Hare
393
The materialists refuted 1 Barrow
394
War with France
395
Description of an earthquake D De Foe 125 Story of Canute
396
Milton 126 Taking of Pontefract Castle Lord Clarendon 127 Wellingtons address to the inhabitants of Oporto
397
Of mans free will 129 Englands crisis
398
Gradual change in mans estimate of pleasure 131 Independence of spirit
399
Moral of the story of Achilles and Chiron N Machiavelli 133 Duty of prosecutors
400
E Burke 134 Youth
401
The ancient critics their employment R Bentley
402
Surrender of the Carthaginians to the Roman army Sir W Ralegh 137 Judgments of wise men R Hooker 138 Interference of learning with business
403
Lord Bacon 139 Beesa pattern of good government F Holland
404
Comparison between Agathocles and Richard III Sir W Ralegh 141 Outdoor occupation of an Athenian gentleman W Mure 142 A dialogue G Berkel...
406
W Robertson 144 Employment variable A Smith 145 Liberty to be given only to those who are worthy of
407
Eumenes Sir W Ralegh 147 Bond of nations E Burke
408
The elementstheir uses G Wilson 149 Actions influenced by notions G Berkeley 150 Independent existence G Berkeley
409
Religion not to be taken on trust 7 Boswell
410
Wealth alone will not cause a flourishing kingdom G Berkeley 153 Republics unfavourable to shining nerit E Burke 154 Reasoning mans most appro...
411
Difference of opinions does not imply uncertainty G Berkeley 156 Nature gives way to custom alone
412
Lord Bacon 157 Envy of virtue generally in the vicious Lord Bacon 158 Opinion 7 Selden
413
Prejudice in favour of antiquity S Johnson 160 Life a dream Sir T Browne 161 Revenge and gratitude
414
Story of a dolphin Sir R Barckley
415
Guilt is never wise T Erskine 164 Democracy favourable to virtue Sir W Blackstone 165 Eros and Anteros
416
Milton 166 Prosperous usurpation E Burke
417
Lisbon under the government of Junot R Southey Asem the manhater and the genius
418
Goldsmith 169 Authority R Hooker 176 The republic of Venice W Robertson
419
Insensibility to the planetary system P B Shelley 172 The principles of government E Burke
420
Darius Hystaspeshis narrow escape out of Scythia Sir W Ralegh 174 A perfect democracy
421
E Burke 175 Customits twofold operation 7 Ruskin 176 Renunciation of freedom
422
Milton 177 Demosthenes C Thirlwall 178 Job iv 1317
423
E Burke 179 Covenants 7 Milton
424
Solon and Peisistratus W S Landor 181 Actions apart from moral considerations 182 Law against the admission of strangers
425
Aristophanes
426
R Porson
427
Factions Lord Bacon 185 Negligence of learned men Lord Bacon 186 Learning may pay homage to wealth Lord Bacon
428
Peccant humours of learning Lord Bacon 188 Praise of knowledge Lord Bacon
429
Inquiry into the souls nature Lord Bacon 190 The true source of poetry
430
Sir W Temple
431
Siege of Naples by Belisarius
437
110
438
212
442
Gods particular providence
443
222
448
Liberty of unlicensed printing
449
230
454
The love of honour and the love of money
456
243
462
Commonwealths and internal evils
468
259
469
120
475
A melancholy
481
Apprehension in wrongs
487
303
492
Of happiness
493
The progress of liberty
499
Lady Jane Grey accepts the crown
503
Character of Cleon
505
351
519
Philip de Comines
535
108

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Passatges populars

Pàgina 439 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause; and be silent that you may hear: believe me for mine honour; and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom; and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Ca;sar was no less than his.
Pàgina 40 - Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend.
Pàgina 67 - But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or furthest end of knowledge. For men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity and inquisitive appetite; sometimes to entertain their minds with variety and delight; sometimes for ornament and reputation; and sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction; and most times for lucre and profession; and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of...
Pàgina 360 - Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise, ever carried this most perilous mode of hardy industry to the extent to which it has been pushed by this recent people ; a people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
Pàgina 86 - The heavens declare the glory of God: and the firmament sheweth his handywork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night sheweth knowledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard.
Pàgina 103 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.
Pàgina 273 - Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom; and a great empire and little minds go ill together.
Pàgina 243 - Now therein of all sciences — I speak still of human, and according to the human conceit — is our poet the monarch. For he doth not only show the way, but giveth so sweet a prospect into the way as will entice any man to enter into it.
Pàgina 439 - Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.

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