Imatges de pàgina
PDF
EPUB

CE
APPENDIX.

lucte lelampe fomen

............................

Since the body of this book went to press, many important facts relating to the growth and prosperity of St. Louis have been collected, and it has been thought worth while to give some of them brief mention in an appendix. It is useless to stereotype a description of St. Louis, for a few weeks or months will render it necessary to revise the text or eke it out with pages of addenda.

The domestic trade of the city for 1870 has been far in advance of any proceding year. The item of wheat is not a fair example, because it falls far below the increase of other articles; but as the statistics for wheat, and flour reduced to wheat, are known up to the last week in December, this item is selected to show that our city is making "no backward steps."

The following table exhibits the receipts of wheat, and flour reduced to wheat, during the last six years :

Bushels. 1870...........

23,115,022 1869.

20,170,422 1868.......

15,444,731 1867.

17,848,755 1866........

22,079,072 1865.........

17,657,252 Inquiries amongst leading merchants lead to the conclusion that the domestic trade of St. Louis for 1870 is largely in advance of that of any preceding year.

Our import trade, as exhibited by the statistics of the Custom House, indi. cates a similar increase in the commercial operations of the city. The augmentation of banking capital, and of loans and deposits, shows plainly the samo general fact. The amount of duties paid on imported merchandise at the St. Louis Custom House for 1870 will vary but slightly, more or less, from $2,000,000. Aby come la cuenta

MANUFACTURES OF ST. LOUIS. The industrial interests of St. Louis have received a grand impulse during the past year, and the general result shows a large increase over any precoding year. The following statement will show the advancement of St. Louis, as a manufacturing city, during the last ten years : Capital invested in manufactures in 1860...........

$12,733,948

48,387,150 Making a clear gain of 284 per cent. in ten years, or 24 4-10 per cent. per annum. The value of raw material used in 1860 was..

16,212,699 in 1870 was....

63,427,509 Making a gain of 269 per cent. in ten years, gr 26 9-10 per cent. per annum. The value of products in 1860 was.

27,610,070 in 1870 was ..............

109,513,950 A gain of 296 per cent. in ten years, or 29 6-10 per cent. per annum.

in 1870...........

66

IRON MANUFACTURE.

While the increaso in every department of manufacturing enterprise has been steady and healthful, the various iron furnaces and iron works of different kinds have shown a wonderful augmentation in the capital employed, the number of operatives, and the value of the products. A few years, at our present rate of advancemont, will realize the prediction of the distinguished Pennsylvania iron-master, that St. Louis is destined to become the great iron center of the American continent.

To illustrate the manner in which the iron business of St. Louis is progressing, we may with propriety refer to a grand enterprise that has beon inaugurated since the body of this book was put in type. The “ Vulcan Iron Works,” established by a company with two millions of capital, and with D. R. Garrison, Esq., as President, will be one of the largest establishments of the kind in America. One of the buildings will be 485x87 feet; one about 200x87, with an L about 190x87 feet. The buildings are being constructed of brick, with slate roofs, and their foundations on the bed-rock. The capacity of the furnaces will be 90 to 100 tons of pig.iron per day, while the rail mill will be able to turn out from 175 to 180 tons of railroad iron every twenty-four hours. At the present value of iron rails ($83 per ton), the annual product of this rail establishment will be nearly or quite $1,000,000—a larger amount than is produced by any single mill in the United States. The mill will employ 350 hands, and the furnaces nearly 100 more, and most of them will be mon with families.

In connection with this general subject of manufactures, it is proper to stato here that we learn from reliable sources that nearly ten millions of capital from the East will be invested in the mechanical industries of St. Louis within the next twelve months.

EDUCATION,

The public school system of St. Louis will compare favorably with that of any city in the world. Amongst the finest structures in the city are the new school-houses erected to meet the universal demand for more light.” St. Louis has now forty-nine public school-houses, some of them with a capacity to accommodato nearly one thousand pupils, and all of them, with their little army of nearly five hundred teachers, give instruction now to about 25,000 pupils. In addition to these educational facilities, which offer to every child of the city a good English education almost“ without money and without price," there are, including universities, collegos, seminarios, private and parochial schools, sixty other institutions of learning within the city, and about 40,000 pupils and students of difforent grades are being educated in the public and private schools of the city.

Income during the last fiscal year for support of public schools, $624,000, of which $522,000 was raised by taxation and $112,000 derived from public funds.

CHURCHES.

As regards churches, there were found to be 26 Catholic, 18 Lutheran, 16 Methodist, 13 Baptist, 13 Presbyterian, 9 Episcopal, 4 Congregational, 3 Hebrew, 3 Christian, 2 Unitarian, and 2 Swedenborgian. The Mormons or Latter Day Saints have two church organizations, but no church edifice. There is also one organization calling itself Spiritualists, without a church edifice. The estimated capacity of the above is 87,200. Estimated value, $3,552,000. Sunday Schools in the city, 103.

[blocks in formation]

The buildings erected or commenced in 1870 number 1,336, at a cost of $5,627,106. Most of these structures are of a very substantial character, built of iron, brick, stone, or marble, and one of them costing upwards of $300,000, and numbers of others more than $50,000 each.

LIST OF STEAMERS AND BARGES PLYING BETWEEN ST. LOUIS AND OTHER PORTS

DURING 1870, WITH THEIR VALUE AND CARRYING CAPACITY. Steamers, 209; barges, 229; total, 433. Value, $6,814,200; carrying capacity, 236,960 tons. This showing of St. Louis tonnage is largely in advance of previous years.

RECEIPTS OF COAL.

The receipts of coal during 1870 were 23,931,475 bushels, a large excess over former years, and showing in itself a great increase in the mechanical industries of the city.

LIBRARY

UNIVERSITY OF

CALIFORNII.

hhat

expenditu

TABULAR STATEMENT,
Showing the Financial and Taxable Condition of some of the Principal Cities of the United States.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

None.

Philadelphia
Brooklyn......
St. Louis.....

22.65.954,613 871,911,327 0.4375 None.}- 2.1375 0.125 2.70 $23,541,605.69 $24.66 $46,811,208.50 7,746,918.94 $79.61

16.25 231,479 569,8:27,300 0.165 0.455 0.455 0.455 1.53 8,718,357.69 37.66 16,959,500.91 $4,858,911.02 94.25
120 657,179 507,987,900 0.1130

None.

None. 1.80 9,143,812.20 13.91 42,401,933.94 3,368,367.641 69.64
396,300 201,326,746 0.70 0.76 3.87

7,897,538.00 26,434,247.38 4,000,000.00
19.9 312,619 187,345,420 0.50 0.40 1.50 10.40 2.80 4,366,948.73 12,430,500.00 1,313,707.81 44.31
34.5 297,718 275,954,600 0.65 1.50 1.50 0.00158 3.65 10,072,344.23 32.85 12,931,000.00 None. 45.43
16 267,599 214,807,062 0.1925

None.

1.50 0.30 1.6925 3,635,610.17 10.32 25,762,826.05 None. 73.16
48 218,900 136, 107,236 0.40 0.365 2.395 0.39 3.16 4,130,610.12 19.21 4,956,000.00 250,000.00 24.21
91 195,000 127,942,781 0.75

None.

2.375 0.1 4.215 5,437,578.19 27.88 18,000,000.00 Nonc. 92.31)
140,000 104,280,483 0.865 0.99 0.99 None. 2.845 2,966,779.74 21.03 4,606,500.00 None. 32.90
100,206 90,806,712 0.45

2.12 0.33 2.90 2,633, 394.65 26.28 4,720,000.00 70,000.00 47.80

[blocks in formation]

...

None.

40,230 24,783,190 0.20

0.8625

1.70

0.30

3.0625

758,985.19 18.87

3,567,000.00

701,892.15 106.19

....

Memphis..
Detroit... (36 per ct. c.v.))
Buffalo......(33 per cent.)

[blocks in formation]

POPULATION.

TABLE showing the Population of the States of the Union, as given by the United States

Census returns for 1860 and 1870; also showing the per cent. of increase each State has made during the past decade, as well as the per cent. of growth for each intervening year.

STATES.

.................................

66

11 47 16 11 75 35 12 23 44 76 142 14 12

3 14

66

3 1.1 4.7 1.6 1.1 7.5 3.5 1.2 2.3 4.4 7.6 14.2 1.4 1.2 } 1.4 4.5 1.7 16.6

.5 4.3 26.1 50 1.2 .8

45

Alabama (approximate)....

964,201 997,146 37,790 Arkansas (estimated).

435,450 472,885 50,653 California

379,994 552,208 176,214 Connecticut (official)

461,147 537,118 76,739 Delaware

112,216 125,015 12,834 District of Columbia (official)...

75,080 131,706 56,809 Florida (estimated)....

140,424 189,995 49,571 Georgia

1,057,286 1,179,886 127,714 Indiana (approximate)..

1,350,428 1,668,169 317,741 Illinois

1,711,951 2,540,216 755,081 Iowa (estimated).

671,913 1,178,389 511,020 Kansas

107,206 362,307 152,234 Kentucky (approximate)..

1,155,684 1,324,087 167,580 Louisiana (estimated)..

708,002 730,118 9,024 Maine (approximate).

628,279 630,423 1,964 Maryland (estimated).

687,049 681,500 92,951 Michigan (official).......

749,113 1,184,296

342,350 Massachusetts (official)..

1,231,063 1,457,351

218,979 Minnesota (estimated)

172,023 335,000

288,014 Mississippi

791,305 834,190 42,885 Missouri

1,182,012 1,700,000 520,988 Nebraska

28,841 123,000 76,159 Nevada (approximate).

6,857 44,686 34,979 New York (estimated).

3,880,785 4,370,703 490,111 North Carolina

992,622 1,041,000 79,378 New Hampshire (official)..

326,073 318,300 Decreased. New Jersey (approximate).

672,035 906,514 227,695 Ohio (approximate)...........

2,339,511 2,675,468 332,791 Oregon (official).......

52,465

90,92257,535 Pennsylvania (estimated).

2,906,115 3,475,000 Rhode Island (official).

174,620 217,356 42,679 South Carolina (estimated).

703, 708 720,000 31,292 Tennessee (estimated).

1,109,801 1,258,326 148,525 Vermont (Official).........

315,098 330,585 25,137 Virginia (estimated)......

1,596,318 1,209,607 West Virginia (estimated).

With Va. 450,000 Wisconsin (approximate)

775,620 1,055,296 Texas (estimated)...........

604,215 797,109

245,785 Total of States and Territories.......... 30,236,460 38,215,231

17 166

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

43 261 500 12 8

14

1.4

[blocks in formation]

276,109.8

3.6

[blocks in formation]

In 1860 we had in the United States twelve cities containing 50,000 inhabitants and upward ; we now have twenty-two, one-half of which are east of the Alleghanies, the other half west of them.

« AnteriorContinua »