Rambles and Studies in Greece

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Macmillan, 1876 - 321 pāgines
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Pāgina 103 - Irish sanctuary has, indeed, endless contrasts to that from the Pagan stronghold, but they are suggestive contrasts, and such as are not without a certain harmony. The plains around both are framed by mountains, of which the Irish are probably the more picturesque; and if the light upon the Greek hills is the fairest, the native colour of the Irish is infinitely more rich. So, again, the soil of Attica is light and sandy, whereas the Golden Vale of Tipperary is among the richest in the world. But...
Pāgina 78 - But there is no ruin all the world over which combines so much striking beauty, so distinct a type, so vast a volume of history, so great a pageant of immortal memories. There, is, in fact, no building on earth which can sustain the burden of such greatness, and so the first visit to the Acropolis is and must be disappointing. When the traveller reflects how all the Old World's culture culminated in Greece — all Greece in Athens — all Athens in its Acropolis — all the Acropolis in the Parthenon...
Pāgina 234 - ... than it sprang at once again into importance, and among the societies addrest in the Epistles of St. Paul, none seems to have lived in greater wealth or luxury. It was, in fact, well-nigh impossible that Corinth should die. Nature had marked out her site as one of the great thoroughfares of the old world; and it was not till after centuries of blighting misrule by the wretched Turks that she sank into the hopeless decay from which not even another Julius Caesar could rescue her.
Pāgina 151 - Much that is excellent and divine,' says he,1 ' does Athens seem to me to have produced and added to our life, but nothing better than those Mysteries, by which we are formed and moulded from a rude and savage life to humanity ; and indeed in the Mysteries we perceive the real principles of life, and learn not only to live happily, but to die with a fairer hope.
Pāgina 18 - A long and careful survey of the extant literature of ancient Greece has convinced me that the pictures usually drawn of the old Greeks are idealized, and that the real people were of a very different — if you please, of a much lower — type.
Pāgina 27 - ... stay their praise — which is ever new and ever old, ever fresh in its decay, ever perfect in its ruin, ever living in its death — the Acropolis of Athens. When I saw my dream and longing of many years fulfilled, the first rays of the rising sun had just touched the heights, while the town below was still hid in gloom. Rock, and rampart, and ruined fanes — all were colored...
Pāgina 103 - Athens, eclipsed by the splendour of the Acropolis. The prospect from the Irish sanctuary has, indeed, endless contrasts to that from the Pagan stronghold, but they are suggestive contrasts, and such as are not without a certain harmony. The plains around both are framed by mountains, of which the Irish are probably the more picturesque ; and if the light upon the Greek hills is the fairest, the native colour of the Irish is infinitely more rich.
Pāgina 102 - It was my good fortune, a few months after I had seen the Acropolis, to visit a ruin in Ireland which, to my great surprise, bore many curious resemblances to it — I mean the Rock of Cashel. Both were strongholds of...
Pāgina 286 - ... Delphi from very early days." Hence, after a time, a complete secularization of music. Besides musical performances in honour of the gods, there grew up in later days performances which ministered solely to aesthetic enjoyments. Distinguishing the sacred from the secular, Mahaffy says the first " were quite separate from the singing and playing in private society, which were cultivated a good deal at Athens, though not at all at Sparta, where such performances were left to professional musicians.
Pāgina 20 - Indeed, in so warm a climate, wine is disagreeable even to the northern traveller ; and, as Herodotus remarked long ago, very likely to produce insanity, the rarest form of disease among the Greeks. In fact, they are not a passionate race — having at all ages been gifted with a very bright intellect, and a great reasonableness — a love of intellectual insight into things, which is inconsistent with the storms of wilder passion. They are, probably, as clever a people as can be found in the world,...

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