A manual of English grammar

Portada
 

Què opinen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Pàgines seleccionades

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Passatges populars

Pàgina 69 - Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm, How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides, Your loop'd and window'd raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these ? O, I have ta'en Too little care of this ! Take physic, pomp ; Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel, That thou mayst shake the superflux to them, And show the heavens more just.
Pàgina 53 - Arm! it is - it is - the cannon's opening roar! Within a window'd niche of that high hall Sate Brunswick's fated chieftain; he did hear That sound the first amidst the festival, And caught its tone with Death's prophetic ear...
Pàgina 69 - Had in her sober livery all things clad; Silence accompanied, for beast and bird, They to their grassy couch, these to their nests, Were slunk, all but the wakeful nightingale; She all night long her amorous descant* sung; Silence was pleased: now...
Pàgina 76 - IF thou would'st view fair Melrose aright, Go visit it by the pale moon-light; For the gay beams of lightsome day Gild, but to flout, the ruins gray.
Pàgina 69 - And yet, on the other hand, unless wariness be used, as good almost kill a man as kill a good book. Who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image; but he who destroys a good book, kills reason itself, kills the image of God, as it were in the eye. Many a man lives a burden to the earth; but a good book is the precious life-blood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life.
Pàgina 77 - Night, of clustering gems A star or two just twinkling on thy brow, Suffices thee ; save that the moon is thine No less...
Pàgina 77 - In letting fall the curtain of repose On bird and beast, the other charged for man With sweet oblivion of the cares of day...
Pàgina 53 - What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted ? Thrice is he armed, that hath his quarrel just ; And he but naked, though locked up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted.

Informació bibliogràfica