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56 Å Description of MONMOUTHSHIRE. Feb. happy consequences to the publick. But I castle, now in ruins, where Henry V. conproceed to mention one other circum

queror of France, was born, from thence stance, which tends, in a great measure, called Henry of Monmouth. The town to the encouragement of robbers.

is govern'd by a mayor, two bailiffs, 15 This is the manner of punishment in- common-council men, a town clerk and Aided upon these offenders, which does other inserior officers ; and it has a connot appear, at this time of day, to be at liderable market on Saturdays for com all adequate to the original, intention of A and other provisions. It formerly gave the law : For the frequency of our Ty- title of duke to James Fitz-roy, afterburn executions, and that conteinpt of wards upon his marriage surnamed Scot, death among our obdurate malefactors, eldest natural son of king Charles II. beprevent the terror which every legislature headed by James 11. for taking arms and intends to cxcite by the severity of the claiming the crown ; and now gives title law.--He therefore proposes a distinction to be of earl to the family of Mordaunt, who are made according to the nature of the crime ; also earls of Peterborough. The coke of the murderers and hardened villains orly to fuf Beaufort has a noble seat near this town, fer death, and the other criminals to be frielly B called Troy. confined to bard labour, &c.

2. Abergavenny, 12 miles W. of Mon

mouth. It takes its name from the river A DESCRIPTION of MONMOUTH

Gavenny, which falls below it into the SHIRE. With a new Map of the fame. Ulke. Tis a handsome town, well built,

encompassed with a wall, has a strong

castle, drives a great trade in fannel, which separates it from Gloucestershire, and has a market on Tuesdays. It gives on the south by the river Severn, on the C title of lord to a branch of the great and west by Brecknockshire, and the river antient family of Nevill, who is the first Rumney, which parts it from Glamorgan- baron of England. Thire, and on the north by the river Mun- 3. Pontypool, 7 miles S. of Aberganow, which divides it from Hereford- venny, a small town, with a market on Thire. Its length from north to south is Saturday, and noted for its iron mills. about 24 miles, its breadth from east to 4. Caerleon, 6 miles S. of Pontypool, wert about 19, and its circumference about on the river Uske, over which it has a 80 miles. It is blessed with a healthy and large wooden bridge, tho' the houses are temperate air, and tho' very hilly and D generally built of stone. It was a fourithsomewhat woody, yet is exceeding fer- ing city in the time of the Romans, tile, especially in the eastern parts, which where one of their legions was quartered, are not so mountainous as the western ; and in the time of the Britons a sort of the hills feeding abundance of cattle and university, having a college for 200 stuTheep, and the valleys hearing great crops dents in astronomy, &c. and a bishop's of corn and grass ; which fertility is much see, afterwards removed to St. David's. increased by its being plentifully watered The town is pretty large, and it has a with many rivers. It contains about e market on Thursday. 340,000 acres, and about 6500 houses. 5. Newport, about 2 miles S. W. of It is divided into 6 hundreds. Its towns Caerleon, also a pretty large town on the are 7, its parishes 127, and it sends 3 Ulke, over which it has a stone bridge. members to parliament, viz. two for the It has a good haven of its own name, county, who at present are William Mor- which occasions many vessels to come here, gan and Capel Hanbury, Esqrs, and one whereby a considerable trade is carried on. for the town of Monmouth, who in the It has a plentiful market on Saturday. present parliament is Fuik Grevile, Esq; 6. Uske, 5 miles N. E. of Pontypool, This county formerly belonged to Wales, F situate on the river of the same name, but is now reckoned one of the English over which it has a bridge : It is a large, counties; and the people speak both well-built town of stone houses, having languages. Abundance of Roman anti- two good markets weekly, viz. on Monquities have been found in it. The day and Friday. towns are,

7. Chepstow, 9 miles S. of Monmouth, 1. Monmouth, the capital of the coun- near the mouth of the Wye, over which ty, 100 computed, and 127 measured it has a good bridge. 'Tis a large, wellmiles N. W. from London. It is pleasant. G built and well-inhabited town, was forly and commodiously situate between the merly fortified and defended by a large, rivers Wye and Munnow, over each of strong castle, and is still one of the best which it has a bridge. 'Tis a fair, large, towns in the county. It has a harbour well-built, and populous town, has a for lips, and a very considerable maritately church, and had formerly a strong ket on Saturdays.

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56 Å Description of MONMOUTHSHIRĖ. Feb. happy consequences to the publick. But I castle, now in ruins, where Henry V. conproceed to mention one other circum

queror of France, was born, from thence Itance, which tends, in a great measure, called Henry of Monmouth. The town to the encouragement of robbers.

is govern'd by a mayor, two bailiffs, 15 This is the manner of punishment in- common-council men, a town clerk and Aicted upon these offenders, which does other inferior officers ; and it has a connot appear, at this time of day, to be at siderable market on Saturdays for corn all adequate to the original, intention of A and other provisions. It formerly gave the law : For the frequency of our 'Ty- title of duke to James Fitz-roy, afterburn executions, and that conteinpt of wards upon his marriage surnamed Scot, death among our obdurate malefactors, eldest natural son of king Charles II. beprevent the terror which every legislature headed by James II. for taking arms and intends to excite by the severity of the claiming the crown ; and now gives title law.--He therefore proposes a distinction to be of earl to the family of Mordaunt, who are made according to tbe nature of the crime ; also earls of Peterborough. The cake of the murderers and hardened villains orly to fuf- Beaufort has a noble seat near this town, for death, and the other criminals to be fricily B called Troy. confined to hard labour, &c.

2. Abergavenny, 12 miles W. of Mon

mouth. It takes its name from the river A DESCRIPTION of MONMOUTH

Gavenny, which falls below it into the SHIRE. With a new Map of the same. Uske. Tis a handsome town, well built,

ONMOUTHSHIRE is bounded encompassed with a wall, has a strong

on the east with the river Wye, castle, drives a great trade in flannel, which separates it from Gloucestershire, and has a market on Tuesdays. It gives on the south by the river Severn, on the C title of lord to a branch of the great and west by Brecknockshire, and the river antient family of Nevill, who is the first Rumney, which parts it from Glamorgan- baron of England. Thire, and on the north by the river Mun- 3. Pontypool, 7 miles S. of Aberga.' now, which divides it from Hereford

venny, a small town, with a market on Inire. Its length from north to south is Saturday, and noted for its iron mills. about 24 miles, its breadth from east to 4. Caerleon, 6 miles S. of Pontypool, weit about 19, and its circumference about on the river Uske, over which it has a 80 miles. It is blessed with a healthy and large wooden bridge, tho' the houses are teniperate air, and tho very hilly and D generally built of stone. It was a fiourithsomewhat woody, yet is exceeding fer- ing city in the time of the Romans, tile, especially in the eastern parts, which where one of their legions was quartered, are not so mountainous as the western ; and in the time of the Britons a sort of the hills feeding abundance of cattle and university, having a college for 200 ftuTheep, and the valleys hearing great crops dents in astronomy, &c. and a bishop's of corn and grass ; which fertility is much see, afterwards removed to St. David's. increased by its being plentifully watered The town is pretty large, and it has a with many rivers. It contains about e market on Thursday. 340,000 acres, and about 6500 houses.

5. Newport, about 2 miles S. W. of It is divided into 6 hundreds. Its towns Caerleon, also a pretty large town on the are 7, its parishes 127, and it sends 3 Ulke, over which it has a stone bridge. members to parliament, viz. two for the It has a good haven of its own name, county, who at present are William Mor- which occasions many vessels to come here, gan and Capel Hanbury, Esqrs, and one whereby a confiderable trade is carried on. for the town of Monmouth, who in the It has a plentiful market on Saturday. present parliament is Fuik Grevile, Esq; 6. Uske, 5 miles N. E. of Pontypool, This county formerly belonged to Wales, F situate on the river of the same name, but is now reckoned one of the English over which it has a bridge : It is a large, counties; and the people speak both well-built town of stone houses, having languages.

Abundance of Roman anti- two good markets weekly, viz. on Monquities have been found in it. The day and Friday. towns are,

7. Chepstow, 9 miles S. of Monmouth, 1. Monmouth, the capital of the coun- near the mouth of the Wye, over which ty, 100 computed, and 127 measured it has a good bridge. 'Tis a large, wellmiles N. W. from London. It is pleasant. G built and well-inhabited town, was forly and commodiously situate between the merly fortified and defended by a large, rivers Wye and Munnow, over each of ftrong castle, and is still one of the best which it has a bridge. 'Tis a fair, large, towns in the county. It has a harbour well-built, and populous town, has a for Mhips, and a very conliderable martately church, and had formerly a Itrong ket on Saturdays.

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