The American Journal of Science

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J.D. & E.S. Dana, 1886
 

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Continguts

A Theorem of Maximum Dissipativity by G F Becker
115
Recent Explorations in the Wappinger Valley Lime
125
Wind Action in Maine by G H Stone
133
The Westward Extension of Rocks of Lower Helder
139
Meteoric Iron from West Virginia by G F Kunz
145
Chemistry and Physics Separation of Liquefied Atmospheric Air into
152
Miscellaneous Scientific Intelligence The Apparent Position of the Zodiacal Light
160
Examination of Dr Crolls Hypotheses of Geo
161
XVTLTendril Movements in Cucurbita maxima and C
178
Note on a Method of Measuring the Surface Ten
189
Observations on the Tertiary of Mississippi and Ala
202
Area of Upper Silurian rocks near Cornwall Station
209
SCIENTIFIC INTELLIGENCE
216
Geology and Mineralogy Bottom Deposits from dredgings under the supervision
228
Botany and Zoology Contributions to tho Flora of the Peruvian Andes with
237
Lower Silurian Fossils from a Limestone of
241
XXIIIPreliminary Report of S W Ford and W
248
Surface Transmission of Electrical Discharges
256
XXVThe Minerals of Litchfield Maine by F W Clarke
262
Chemical Behavior of Iron in the Magnetic Field
272
The Inculcation of Scientific Method by Example
284
Nova Andromedie by Asaph Hall
299
SCIENTIFIC INTELLIGENCE
308
Botany and Zoology Botaukal Necrology for 1885 312 Drugs and Medicines
315
The columnar structure in the igneous rock
321
Larval Theory of the Origin of Tissue by
332
Cretaceous Metamorphic Rocks of California
348
Arnold Guyot
358
Determination of Fossil Dicotyledonous Leaves
370
Pseudomorphs of Liraonite after Pyrite by E
376
Note ou the Structure of tempered Steel by C
386
Geoiogy and Natural History GasWells on Anticlinals I C White 393 Volcano
406
The Biela Meteors of November 27tli 1885
409
Memorial of Edward Tuckerman by Asa Gray 1
1
Notes on American Earthquakes No 16 by C
7
Observations on the Tertiary and Grand Gulf of Missis
20
Notes on the Volcanic Rocks of the Republic of Salva
26
Preliminary Report on the Geology of the Cobscook
35
On the WellSpherometer an instrument that meas
61
On some general terms applied to Metamorphism
69
Geology and Natural History The Cretaceous Flora of North America New
77
On hitherto unrecognized Wavelengths
83
On the chemical composition of Herderite and Beryl
107
Communications from the U S Geological Survey
117
Temperature Observations at the Lake Superior
125
On the Crystallization of Gold by E S Dana 132
132
Classification of the Cambrian System of North
138
Note on the Spectrum of Comet C 1886 by O
157
Vol
163
A dissected volcanic Mountain some of
247
Origin of the Ferruginous Schists and Iron Ores
255
Further Notes on the Artificial Lead Silicate from
272
Crystalline Structure of Iron Meteorites by
284
New Meteoric Iron from Texas by W
304
Further notes on the Meteoric Iron from Glorieta
311
SCIENTIFIC INTELLIGENCE
317
Geology and Natural History Brief Notices of papers read before the Geological
325
Moons Surface
332
The higher Oxides of Copper by Thomas
333
The structure of the Triassic formation of
342
Researches on the Lithia Micas by F W Clarke 353
353
Thickness of the Ice in Northeastern Pennslyvania
362
Photographic Determinations of Stellar Positions
369
Lucasite a new variety of Vermiculite by Thomas
375
Mineralogical Notes by Edward S Dana 386
386
Meeting of the Inter
412

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Passatges populars

Pāgina 3 - A Catalogue of Plants growing without Cultivation within Thirty Miles of Amherst College* (1875) ; and 'A Synopsis of North American Lichens, Part I.* (1882).
Pāgina 397 - Do not the vast masses of basalt, the general appearances of mountain ranges, the violent distortions and fractures of strata, the great prevalence of metamorphic action (which must have taken place at depths of not many miles if so much), all agree in demonstrating that the rate of increase of temperature downwards must have been much more rapid, and in rendering it probable that volcanic energy, earthquake shocks, and every kind of so-called Plutonic action, have been, on the whole, more abundantly...
Pāgina 404 - ... is one, two, three or four divisions; and the approach to or retreat from, the neutral line deciding the electro-negative or electro-positive character of the element — all on the retreating half of the swing being positive and all on the approaching half negative — this oscillating force must be intimately connected with the imponderable matter, essence or source of energy we call electricity.
Pāgina 390 - ... years to remove one foot of rock from the general surface of a river basin. From a consideration of the denuding power of rivers, and a measurement of the thickness of stratified rock, Phillips has made an estimate of the period of time comprised in geological history, and finds that, from stratigraphical evidence alone, we may regard the antiquity of life on the earth as being possibly between 38 and 96 millions of years f.
Pāgina 434 - Staley bridge to Burnley and thence to Skipton in Yorkshire. Northeast of Burnley it is banked against the Boulsworth hills up to a height of 1300 feet in the form of mounds and hummocks. South and east of this long moraine no signs of glaciation were discovered, while north and west of it there is every evidence of a continuous ice-sheet covering land and sea alike. The...
Pāgina 399 - And when finally we consider underground temperature we find ourselves driven to the conclusion that the existing state of things on the earth, life on the earth, and all geological history showing continuity of life, must be limited within some such period of past time as one hundred million years.
Pāgina 360 - ... zoological classification that were the subjects of thought and discussion, and became profoundly impressed thereby, as his later work shows. From Carlsruhe, Guyot went to Stuttgart and took the course at the gymnasium, where he made himself a proficient in the German language. Returning to Neuchatel in 1827, and there quickened in his religious faith and feelings by the preaching of the Rev.
Pāgina 398 - It seems therefore, on the whole, most probable that the sun has not illuminated the earth for 100,000,000 years, and almost certain that he has not done so for 500,000,000 years. As for the future, we may say with equal certainty that inhabitants of the earth cannot continue to enjoy the light and heat essential to their life for many million years longer, unless new sources, now unknown to us, are prepared in the great storehouse of Creation.
Pāgina 19 - A Catalogue of the Native and Naturalized Plants of the City of Buffalo and Its Vicinity.
Pāgina 363 - Guyot, who hesitated at accepting his views without examination, to study the facts, and obtained the promise that he would visit the glaciers that summer. In his memoir of Agassiz, Guyot states that his six weeks of investigation that season in the Central Alps (nearly two years before Agassiz commenced his investigations on the Glacier of the Aar) were fruitful beyond expectation.

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