Parliament and Foreign Policy in the Eighteenth Century

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Cambridge University Press, 26 de febr. 2004 - 261 pàgines
Drawing on a wide range of British and foreign archival sources, this book tackles the role of Parliament in the conduct of eighteenth-century foreign policy, the impact of this policy on parliamentary politics, and the quality of parliamentary debates. It is also an important study for our assessment of eighteenth-century Britain, and also, more generally, for an understanding of the role of contingency in the assessment of political systems. Reflecting over a quarter-century of work on parliamentary sources, the book highlights the influence of Parliament, positive and negative, direct and indirect, on foreign policy and politics. It also has great contemporary relevance as we consider the effectiveness of democratic states when confronting authoritarian rivals, and the rights of representative bodies to be consulted before wars are launched.
 

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Continguts

1 Introduction
1
2 The Revolution Settlement Parliament and foreign policy 16891714
13
3 The Walpolean system Parliament and foreign policy 171442
40
4 The midcentury crisis Parliament and foreign policy 174260
78
5 George III Parliament and foreign policy 17601800
99
6 Sources and reports
137
7 Character and quality of parliamentary discussion
164
8 A parliamentary foreign policy?
200
9 Conclusions
233
Select bibliography
247
Index
256
Copyright

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Sobre l'autor (2004)

Jeremy Black MBE is Professor of History at the University of Exeter.

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