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knew how to make a fight of it, and est national pride, blended with the let Meggs drive him about as he deepest shame, that we, as an Irishpleased; and after seventeen minutes man, write down, in large capitals, in humbugging the spectators, Stevens the name of Peter Corcoran. gave in. The sporting men were pro

“ A most celebrated pugilist, from the perly swindled on the occasion,

and sister country, was born at Athye, in the the Nailer had the impudence to ac

county of Carlow, who took the lead for knowledge, soon after, that he was

some years as a boxer in England, and tipped handsomely to lose the battle. might be said to be the best man of his time; The nailers and blacksmiths of the was five feet eleven inches in height, well metropolis were finely spoke to by the proportioned limbs, and of prodigious loss of this battle ; and it is said, that strength. Peter, from a boy, was distina celebrated engraving, now extant,

of guished for his uncommon intrepidity; and a blacksmith's shop, where the Nailer

was looked upon in the vicinity of his fahad worked, the men of which had ther's mud edifice, as the cock of the walk :

He left Ireland a mere stripling; and in sported their little cash upon his head, his peregrination to the metropolis, Birwas taken from their hearing he had mingham chanced to fall in his way, and in lost the battle.

which place, through an accidental skirmish,

his fame rose so high as a pugilist, that it “I saw a smith stand with his hammer thus,

was not long in reaching London. CorThe whilst his iron did on the anvil cool,

coran was accompanied from the sod by an. With open mouth swallowing a tailor's news,

other tight boy, and it so fell out with Pe. Who, with his shears and me ure in his

ter and his friend, for money was the tighthand, Standing on slippers, which his nimble haste withstanding this scarcity of rhino, hunger

est thing they had about them ; but, notHad falsely thrust upon contrary feet,” &c.

will often intrude where there are no pockFrom the year 1761 to 1783, the

ets at all; and a beautiful little shoulder of championship was in a very unsettled mutton, hanging up at a butcher's shop, so state, “ and knocked about quickly fastened on the longing imagination of hun. from one nob to another, as there gry Peter, that he could not pass it, and inwere few heads to be found whom the difference occurring respecting the terms,

stantly went in to know the price. Some conqueror's cap could fit for any Master Steel, without ceremony threatened length of time. There was, however, to knock the shoulder about poor Paddy's no want of sharp fighting ; but there nob! It appeared that this butcher was a was no great master-genius among

bit of a hit a body, and well known in Bir. pugilists in those days—like Scott or mingham as a pugilist, and distinguished Byron among our present

bards ; and for his insolence, and who flattered himself

that he should have a little sport with these really we feel as if criticism would be

hay-makers, as he termed them ; but, in thrown away upon the Meggs, the the sequel, it turned out somewhat different Jackaws, the Shepherds, and Lambs, Peter, who had not only felt himself baulk. who were about as good boxers-ased of his beautiful little joint, but insulted Duke, Pomfret, Fenton, Broom, &c. also, exclaimed, with all the fervour of the were poets. Darts and Death were brogue, . By

Mr Butcher, but you unquestionably the best fighting men

have too much prate and for half a pin,

I'd bate the mutton about your greasy carspoken of by Mr Egan in his chapter entitled “ Miscellaneous Pugilism;"

cass ! Paddy had scarcely uttered these and though there are a good many

words, when the butcher shewed fight, and

a regular set-to commenced ; a concourse of others, whom, by mentioning in this people soon collected, and Peter, with his Magazine, we might

clumsy thumps, served out the knight of “ Eternize here on earth,”

the cleaver in the presence of his neigh

bours, and knocked down his consequence yet shall we imitate the example of as a fighting man in the course of a few our master, Milton, and pass them all minutes ; and shortly afterwards enjoyed over as he did the many dozen of de his mutton with as keen an appetite as if vils whom he would not condescend to nothing had happened ! and the next day

pursued his journey to London.

“ Corcoran, upon his arrival in the me“ Therefore eternal silence be their doom.” tropolis, commenced coal-heaver, but which But one hero there was who fought

calling he soon left for that of chairman ; and conquered during this very de

and, owing to some trifling dispute, it was bateable period, whom, for our very

not long afterwards when he went to sea,

where the rough elements gave additional souls, we cannot pass by in this Mil- vigour to his athletic frame; and, from the tonic manner; and it is with the high frequent specimens he at times had display.

name.

ed, was considered, for a mill, the first man into circulation, accounting for Darts' losing in the fleet, and was patronised by Captain the battle, that Colonel O'Kelly, one of the Perceval. When at Portsmouth, he per most celebrated sportsmen upon the turf, formed a number of feats of strength, and and who, undoubtedly, was awake to every one, among the number, was beating a manæuvre in gambling that could be tried whole press-gang, and breaking the lieu. on with any degree of certainty, either on tenant's sword over his head. Peter, on the turf or at the table, play or pay-cockleaving the navy, came to London, and pit, or racquets, backed his countryman for took the Black Horse, in Dyot-street, St a large amount ; but to make his bets dead Giles's, where his disposition was experi. sure, on the night previous to the fight, he enced to be generous, truly good-natured, presented Darts with one hundred pounds and remarkably tender-hearted. As a pu. not even to try to win the battle, but posigilist, he was a first-rate article, possessing tivdy to lose it. Surely no thorough-bred bottom which could not be excelled, as he sportsman conld commit such a bare-faced did not know how to shift, and scorned to robbery! And, upon the best information, fall without a knock-down blow! Peter we are assured, that Darts, in his prime, was denominated a straight fighter ; put in was never half man enough for Corcoran ! his blows with uncommon force; and pos- “ Sam Peters, who fought Peter at Wal. sessed great confidence in his own powers. tham-Abbey, in Essex, was the best man, His attitude was considered too erect, his according to Corcoran's own account, that arms not sufficiently extended, by which ever set-to with him. It was a complete hammeans his guard was incomplete. But mering fight; and, at the expiration of ten Corcoran was distinguished for the use of minutes, Peters declared he was satisfied ; both his hands with equal facility ; his aim and Corcoran's body for several days after. was generally correct, and he scarcely ever wards was entirely black, the bruises were missed the object in view ; and was pecu- so extremely severe. liarly successful in taking advantage of “ Corcoran, who had hitherto beat all any trifling neglect in his adversary, and the men which had been brought against him, likewise celebrated for an extraordinary and whose powers appeared not in the least jumper.

diminished, was now doomed to sink fast into « Peter had several scholars, among obscurity, from his memorable contest with whom was Big Pitt, well known for many Sellers, á West Countryman. There is a years as one of the turnkeys of Newgate, a considerable mystery hanging over that man of uncommon size and strength; and transaction, and it was most undoubtedly, being one night at Joyces's house, a pugi. at the period when they fought, October 16, list, in the Haymarket, brim full of con. 1776, the general opinion of the sporting ceit, surrounded by fighting men, foolishly world, that it was a complete do! it being exclaimed, that some of the milling coves well understood that Sellers was deficient in had taught their pupils so well, that many science and bottom when placed in competiof them were able to beat their masters !' tion with Peter. The battle was for one Upon which Peter instantly got up, and ad hundred guineas, and decided at Staines dressing himself to Pitt--What's that you On the set-to, Peter (who had always fought say, you spalpeen ? come, come out ! Pitt for victory previous to this combat,) began, stood up, but received such a leveller upon as usual, and drove Sellers about the stage the head, as completely knocked all recol- like a shuttle-cock, and put in a blow so lection out of him, for a few minutes, of powerful in its effect, as to knock down Sel. what he had been throwing-off about ! and lers, who fell at a considerable distance upon recovering himself, acknowledged he from him. The odds were considerably had been most woefully deceived.

high on Peter ; who, as if recollecting that “ Peter beat one Turner, who fought he had done too much, immediately suffcr. him for twenty pounds; and although the ed himself, so as to make it have the aplatter had beaten the Nailer, yet, in the pearance of a fight, to be beat about the hands of Corcoran, he was soon disposed of. stage for ten minutes, when he gave in!

“ In the Long-fields, behind the British This contest, if it can be so called, took Museum, Peter had a good battle with one twenty-three minutes. The knowing ones Dalton, an Irishman; and also with Jack were completely dished, at least, those who Davies. They were both beaten dread. were in the secret, and the poor Paddies fully.

were literally ruined, as many of them had A desperate contest took place in backed their darling boy with every farthing Moorfields, between Smiler, the brickmaker, they possessed. St Giles was in a complete and Corcoran, when Peter was again victo- uproar with mutterings and disapprobation rious.

at Peter's conduct ! " The famous Bill Darts now mounted “ Previous to the fight, Peter's house the state with Corcoran, for two hundred was almost destitute of any liquor—and he pounds, to give additional sport to Epsom had been threatened with an execution for races. The set-to commenced with cautious rent, &c. ; but in a day or two after the sparring upon the part of Darts, who soon set-lo, the house was flowing with all sorts discovered that he would not win ; and in a of spirits, &c., graced with plenty of new short time gave in! A singular report crept pots; the inside and out painted, and every thing got up in a superior style to what it Alas! we cannot, when thinking of had ever been witnessed before and the Bill Stevens and Peter Corcoran, exvery next morning, after the mill, Peter claim Corcoran was playing at shuttles at the Blackeney's Head, si Giles's, with all the “Heu pietas, heu priscafides, invictaque bello activity and cheerfulness of a man who had Dextra !”. never been engaged at all in pugilism. He

But the

age of Johnson and Big Ben shortly afterwards sunk into beggary and succeeds, and while we exclaim contempt, and was as much despised as he had been before respected: and was so “ Visions of glory share our aching sight,” miserably poor at his decease, that his re

we also find that our limits render mains were interred by subscription ! Reminding us, that

it necessary that we defer our account.

of those distinguished Gluttons to ano“ Honour and shame from no condition rise, Act well your part-there all the honour lies!”

ther Number.

MUSICAL QUERIES.

MR EDITOR,

to meet the first doubts and difficul. WHOEVER has taken a philosophical ties that spring up in the mind of the view of the science and practice of musical tyro, in the execution of music, must feel much interest in the which it explains (by means of a new Queries put by a Correspondent in but simple theory, in perfect conso your Twenty-Eighth Number,--Que- nance with all received musical facts) ries which are by no means answered all the questions left unanswered by in the succeeding one.

the most scientific writers. It is true It happens, however, that our mo- that this theory is assumed in the first dern musical professors seem to think instance; but its proofs and explanaa philosophical view of the subject to- tions go hand in hand, so as to be intally unnecessary-confining them- telligible to the youngest beginner, selves to the routine of practice, and and, I should conceive, convincing to replying to every question beyond that the

most inquisitive. with the general answer-"'Tis the The theory is, that musical sounds nature of the key."

have their origin in human feeling, So far indeed they are right. It is and therefore spring up first in the the nature of the key; but if they are human mind; that utterance is given asked, “ why it is the nature of the to them by the human voice, in conkey?" their science is at an end. Just sonance with which are the powers of like the Indians, who place the world sonorous inanimate bodies; and that upon an elephant, and the elephant they are carried back to the mind by upon a tortoise, but are puzzled when the human ear. asked “ what the tortoise stands up- It assumes, that when a human bo

dy is in a state of musical perfection, Even the best writers give up cer- then the mind, the larynx, and the tain points in despair, saying, that ear, are all tuned perfect unison, they can only refer certain musical which unison may be disturbed in phenomena " to the will of the Crea- any one of them by certain causes, tor," and decline any farther investi- when the disturbed member changes gation of the intermediate causes; its key, and tunes the other two in and well indeed may they do so, ar- unison with that change. guing up to musical feeling and ex- It divides all the feelings of the pression from the vibrations of the human frame, mental or corporeal, minor chord, or to the more artificial under two heads, pleasure and pain. arrangement of a keyed instrument. It shews that each of these, in a state

But, sir, I can inform your Querist, of nature, or infancy, prompts to the that he will find a plain, ready, and utterance of sounds, which, under the simple solution to all his doubts and influence of the first, are uttered in difficulties in a small work, published certain intervals, ascending in the maby Sherwood & Co. about four years jor. key, and under the influence of ago, under the humble and unassum- the second, are uttered in similar ining title of the “ Piano-forte Pocket tervals descending in the minor key. Companion;" a work whose object is It shews that the first is that natu.

on?”

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ed, was considered, for a mill, the first man into circulation, accounting for Darts' losing
in the fleet, and was patronised by Captain the battle, that Colonel O'Kelly, one of the
Perceval. When at Portsmouth, he per. most celebrated sportsmen upon the turf,
formed a number of feats of strength, and and who, undoubtedly, was awake to every
one, among the number, was beating á manorivre in gambling that could be tried
whole press-gang, and breaking the lieu- on with any degree of certainty, either on
tenant's sword over his head. Peter, on the turf or at the table, play or pay-cock-
leaving the navy, came to London, and pit, or racquets, backed his countryman for
took the Black Horse, in Dyot-street, St a large amount; but to make his bets dead
Giles's, where his disposition was experi• sure, on the night previous to the fight, he
enced to be generous, truly good-natured, presented Darts with one hundred pounds
and remarkably tender-hearted. As a pu. not even to try to win the battle, but posi-
gilist, he was a first-rate article, possessing tively to lose it. Surely no thorough-bred
bottom which could not be excelled, as he sportsman could commit such a bare-faced
did not know how to shift, and scorned to robbery! And, upon the best information,
fall without a knock-down blow ! Peter we are assured, that Darts, in his prime,
was denominated a straight fighter ; put in was never half man enough for Corcoran !
his blows with uncommon force ; and pos- “ Sam Peters, who fought Peter at Wal.
sessed great confidence in his own powers. tham-Abbey, in Essex, was the best man,
His attitude was considered too erect, his according to Corcoran's own account, that
arms not sufficiently extended, by which ever set-to with him. It was a complete ham-
means his guard was incomplete. But mering fight; and, at the expiration of ten
Corcoran was distinguished for the use of minutes, Peters declared he was satisfied ;
both his hands with equal facility ; his aim and Corcoran's body for several days after.
was generally correct, and he scarcely ever wards was entirely black, the bruises were
missed the object in view ; and was pecu- so extremely severe.
liarly successful in taking advantage of “ Corcoran, who had hitherto beat all
any trifling neglect in his adversary, and the men which had been brought against him,
likewise celebrated for an extraordinary and whose powers appeared not in the least
jumper.

diminished, was now doomed to sink fast into ** Peter had several scholars, among obscurity, from his memorable contest with whom was Big Pitt, well known for many Sellers, a West Countryman. There is a years as one of the turnkeys of Newgate, a considerable mystery hanging over that man of uncommon size and strength ; and transaction, and it was most undoubtedly, being one night at Joyces's house, a pugin at the period when they fought, October 16, list, in the Haymarket, brim full of con- 1776, the general opinion of the sporting ceit, surrounded by fighting men, foolishly world, that it was a complete do ! it being exclaimed, that some of the milling coves well understood that Sellers was deficient in had taught their pupils so well, that many science and bottom when placed in competiof them were able to beat their masters !' tion with Peter. The battle was for one Upon which Peter instantly got up, and ad- hundred guineas, and decided at Staines. dressing himself to Pittam What's that you On the set-to, Peter (who had always fought say, you spalpeen 2 come, come out ! Pitt for victory previous to this combat,) began, stood up, but received such a leveller upon as usual, and drove Sellers about the stage the head, as completely knocked all recol- like a shuttle-cock, and put in a blow so lection out of him, for a few minutes, of powerful in its effect, as to knock down Selwhat he had been throwing-off about ! and lers, who fell at a considerable distance upon recovering himself, acknowledged he from him. The odds were considerably had been most woefully deceived.

high on Peter ; who, as if recollecting that “ Peter beat one Turner, who fought he had done too much, immediately sufferhim for twenty pounds; and although the ed himself, so as to make it have the aplatter had beaten the Nailer, yet, in the pearance of a fight, to be beat about the hands of Corcorau, he was soon disposed of. stage for ten minutes, when he gave in!

" In the Long-fields, behind the British This contest, if it can be so called, took Museum, Peter had a good battle with one twenty-three minutes. The knowing ones Dalton, an Irishman; and also with Jack were completely dished, at least, those who Davies. They were both beaten dread- were in the secret, and the poor Paddies fully.

were literally ruined, as many of them had 11 A desperate contest took place in backed their darling boy with every farthing Moorfields, between Smiler, the brickmaker, they possessed. St Giles was in a complete and Corcoran, when Peter was again victo uproar with mutterings and disapprobation rious.

at Peter's conduct ! * T famous Bill Darts now mounted “ Previous to the fight, Peter's house the state with Corcoran, for two hundred was almost destitute of any liquor and he pounds, to give additional sport to Epsom had been threatened with an execution for

The set-to commenced with cautious rent, &c. ; but in a day or two after the sparring upon the part of Darts, who soon setato, the house was flowing with all sorts discovered that he would not win ; and in a of spirits, &c., graced with plenty of new short time gave in ! A singular report crept pots; the inside and out painted, and every

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races.

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thing got up in a superior style to what it Alas! we cannot, when thinking of
had ever been witnessed before and the Bill Stevens and Peter Corcoran, ex-
very next morning after the mill, Peter claim
Corcoran was playing at shuttles at the
Blackeney's Head, St Giles's, with all the “ Heu pietas, heu prisca fides, invictaque bello
activity and cheerfulness of a man who had Dextra !"
never been engaged at all in pugilism. He But the

age of Johnson and Big Ben
shortly afterwards sunk into beggary and
contempt

, and was as much despised as he succeeds, and while we exclaim had been before respected: and was so

“ Visions of glory share our aching sight," miserably poor at his decease, that his re

we also find that our limits render mains were interred by subscription ! Reminding us, that

it necessary that we defer our account

of those distinguished Gluttons to anoAct well your part-there all the honour lies!"

ther Number.

“ Honour and shame from no condition rise,

MUSICAL QUERIES.

MR EDITOR,

to meet the first doubts and difficul. WHOEVER has taken a philosophical ties that spring up in the mind of the view of the science and practice of musical tyro, in the execution of music, must feel much interest in the which it explains (by means of a new Queries put by a Correspondent in but simple theory, in perfect consoyour Twenty-Eighth Number --Que- nance with all received musical facts) ries which are by no means answered all the questions left unanswered by in the succeeding one.

the most scientific writers. It is true It happens, however, that our mo- that this theory is assumed in the first dern musical professors seem to think_instance; but its proofs and explanaa philosophical view of the subject to- tions go hand in hand, so as to be intally unnecessary --confining them- telligible to the youngest beginner, selves to the routine of practice, and and, I should conceive, convincing to replying to every question beyond that the most inquisitive. with the general answer''Tis the The theory is, that musical sounds nature of the key."

have their origin in human feeling, So far indeed they are right. It is and therefore spring up first in the the nature of the key; but if they are human mind; that utterance is given asked, " why it is the nature of the to them by the human voice, in conkey?" their science is at an end. Just sonance with which are the powers of like the Indians, who place the world sonorous inanimate bodies; and that upon an elephant, and the elephant they are carried back to the mind by upon a tortoise, but are puzzled when the human ear. asked “ what the tortoise stands up- It assumes, that when a human bo

dy is in a state of musical perfection, Even the best writers give up cer- then the mind, the larynx, and the tain points in despair, saying, that ear, are all tuned in perfect unison, they can only refer certain musical which unison may be disturbed in phenomena si to the will of the Crea- any one of them by certain causes, tor," and decline any farther investi- when the disturbed member changes gation of the intermediate causes; its key, and tunes the other two in and well indeed may they do so, ar- unison with that change. guing up to musical feeling and ex- It divides all the feelings of the pression from the vibrations of the human frame, mental or corporeal, minor chord, or to the more artificial under two heads, pleasure and pain. arrangement of a keyed instrument. It shews that each of these, in a state

But, sir, I can inform your Querist, of nature, or infancy, prompts to the that he will find a plain, ready, and utterance of sounds, which, under the simple solution to all his doubts and influence of the first, are uttered in difficulties in a small work, published certain intervals, ascending in the maby Sherwood & Co. about four years jor. key, and under the influence of ago, under the humble and unassume the second, are uttered in similar ining title of the “ Piano-forte Pocket' tervals descending in the minor key. Companion ;" a work whose object is. It shews that the first is that natu.

on?"

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