Comin' Thro' the Rye: A Novel

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R. Bentley, 1876 - 251 pàgines
 

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Pàgina 50 - Happy in this, she is not yet so old But she may learn; and happier than this, She is not bred so dull but she can learn; Happiest of all, is, that her gentle spirit Commits itself to yours to be directed, As from her lord, her governor, her king.
Pàgina 450 - O Proserpina, For the flowers now, that frighted thou let'st fall From Dis's waggon ! daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty ; violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath ; pale primroses, That die unmarried, ere they can behold Bright Phoebus in his strength...
Pàgina 481 - Out, alas! she's cold; Her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff; Life and these lips have long been separated. Death lies on her like an untimely frost Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.
Pàgina 229 - ... from the North and from the South, from the East and from the West, all anxious to join as members of one nation for the good of our country.
Pàgina 399 - O let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven ! Keep me in temper ; I would not be mad ! — Enter Gentleman.
Pàgina 151 - That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger To sound what stop she please. Give me that man That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart, As I do thee.
Pàgina 434 - Against thy mother aught; leave her to heaven, And to those thorns that in her bosom lodge To prick and sting her.
Pàgina 3 - ... of reading the new works before they came out. In fine, I have never neglected any opportunity of improving my mind ; and the worst that can be...
Pàgina 286 - My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite.
Pàgina 103 - tis in ourselves that we are thus or thus. Our bodies are our gardens, to the which our wills are gardeners ; so that if we will plant nettles, or sow lettuce, set hyssop and weed up thyme, supply it with one gender of herbs, or distract it with many, either to have it sterile with idleness, or manured with industry, why, the power and corrigible authority of this lies in our wills.

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