Imatges de pÓgina
PDF
EPUB

no sooner is there mention made of the name, than that easily follows in a natural order ; which, I be

I . lieve, adds considerably to the work.

Thirdly, I have taken care to separate the example from the rule ; because boys are often apt to lay an equat stress on every word contained in the rule; and generally want judgment to distinguish betwixt that and the example that illuftrates it. Besides, it does not

seem to me fo proper to give the English in verse ; because the measure must require some words to which the rule adds no weight in that particular circumstance : whereas in this scheme, I have chosen füch examples, as I thought most proper, easy and familiar, and best adapted to the design of the Figure ; without adding one word more than was absolutely necessary to complete the sense.

Fourthly, because the names of the Figures, ex cepting very few, are Greek words, and consequentby cannot excite in their minds the proper ideas affix: ed to them, without a tolerable acquaintance with the original; I thought it would be very necessary to translate them into English, and also to give their derivations from the Greek ; that the young

student may not only understand the Figure itself, but also the particular meaning of its name.

(v.)

Preface to Mr. Holmes's Rhetoric.

WHAT now remains, is to mention the improvements made in this piece, and to whom we are obliged for them. Having looked over fome performances for this purpose, none came so near the original design, as Mr. Holmes's, to whom the public is much indebted for his other labours, in improving the education of youth. On attentively considering his Art of Rhetoric, we were immediately led to make afe of it ; he having introduced his System with an explanation of its nature and use, pointing out the parts of a theme and an ora

а tion, with which the knowledge of Rhetoric is so connected, that the ability of performing with excellency one or other, depends on the proper dis

, posing of words and sentences, and so connecting them as to have all the advantage of language, which is centered in Rhetoric.

This knowledge has been hitherto confined to the learned languages; and it has been thought, that instances of its use were no where to be found but in the Classics ; which has erected such a veneration for them, as to deprive every other performance of any merit in that way.

. Upon how unfair a foundation this fuperstruc-. ture has been raised, must appear from this performance ; in which the Trope, Figure, Allegory, &c. being the flowers collected from the bed of Rhetoric, are illustrated from the sacred writings.

This may in time give them that dignity they merit in this particular, and add to the reverence and respect every intelligent being should pay to the Word of GOD.

This performance is peculiarly adapted to the English Reader; and as our language of late is rifing to a dignity its natives would gladly see established, nothing can engage a fondness for it more than a piece (however diminutive) that points out her beauties, and shows that she is not less destitute of them than any other tongue.

That the scholar therefore may have some pieces ready for his praxis, we have selected some of the most capital pieces from English authors, as instances of the several passions of the mind, and the different modes of speech ; which by a proper ufe, under the inspection of his teacher, may enable him in time to speak with fluency and elegance; and remove a criminal modesty, so frequently a bar to genius.

TO THE

NÁMES of the FIGURE..

Note. The numeral figures, following the names of
the figures of speech, show where the diftich both in
English and Latin is to be found.

[ocr errors]

ÆNigma

40

28

18 Charientísmus

Climax
8 Diaéresis
56 Diályton
25 Diasy'rmus
21 Diástole
84 Ecphonésis
19: Echlipfis
83 Elleípsis
36 Enállage

12 Enantiolis

Ætiología
Aliegoría
Anacænofis
Anadiplófis-
Anáphora
Anástrophe
Antanaclásis
Antimería
Antimetabole
Antiphrasis
Antiptósis
Antithesis
Antonomasia
Aphaéresis
Apócope
Apóphasis
Aporía
Apofiopéfis
Apóstrophe
Apposítio
Afteísmus
Asy'ndeton
Catachréfis

83 Epánados
67 Epanalépsis

9 Epanorthosis
61 Epénthesis
64 Epiphonéma
47 Epístrophe
57 Epítrope
55 Epizeúxis
59 | Erotéfis
87 | Evocátio
14 Hellenísmus
75 Hendíadys
5 Homoioteleúton

0

94
75.
15.
92
52
89
*72.
82
37
26
24
54
63
53
22
43
27
51
85
79
50
32

viii

Hypállage Hyperbaton Hypérbole Hy'phen Hypotypófis Hy'steron Incrementum Invérfio lrónia Litótes Metalépfis Metaphora Metathefis Metony/mia Onomatopoéïa Oxymoron Paradiástole Paragóge Paraleíplis Parechéfis Parégmenon Parénthesis Paroémia Parólce

IN DE X. 78 | Paronomália 76 Periphrafis

31 49 68 20 29 69 42 58 60 16 74 29 38 93 90 46 62

3 45

86

6 Pleopásmus
81 Plóce
34 Polyptóton
77 | Polyfy'ndeton
44 | Prolépfis
41 Prosopopoéïa

4 Prósthefis
10 Sarcásmus
7 Syllépfis
1 Sy'mploce
66 Syncceiéfis

2 Synaéresis
11 Synalaépha
39 Synathroésmus
35' Sy'ncope
65 Synécdoche
48 Synony'mia
33 Sy'nthesis
30 ! Sy'stole
70 Tméfis
17 Zeugma
1

91 802 73

For Gontents of Mr. Holmes' Rhetoric, fec last page.

« AnteriorContinua »