Mistaken Identity

Portada
New Directions Publishing, 1988 - 195 pàgines
The year is 1929, India is torn by strikes, the British Raj is close to panic, and Bhushan Singh, the purposeless but amiable son of a minor raja, is arrested on his train journey home to North India, mistakenly charged with treason, and thrown into jail. As the months of awaiting trial stretch into years, the apolitical Bhushan entertains his communist cell-mates with tales of his world; of his veiled and idiosyncratic mother; of his very modern Parsee girlfriend (she wears dresses); of the American flapper who taught him the Turkey Trot; of his forbidden boyhood affair which sparked off two murderous Hindu-Moslem riots and led to his banishment abroad. Around the mystery of his arrest and into his stories Sahgal infuses suspense, gentle irony, and a wealth of Northern India's culture. Mistaken Identity is at once a family saga, a romance, a rich historical novel, and, perhaps most keenly, a fable concerning the implacable working of karma.
 

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Pàgines seleccionades

Continguts

Secció 1
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Secció 2
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22
Secció 4
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Secció 5
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56
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Sobre l'autor (1988)

Nayantara Sahgal is one of the most prolific writers in India today. The niece of Jawaharlal Nehru and cousin (and political enemy) of the late Indira Gandhi, Sahgal is known to have insisted, "being Nehru's niece or Madame Pandit's daughter has neither been a help or a hindrance---it has simply been my inheritance and background---but being Mrs. Gandhi's cousin as well as critic is another matter. It has given me a glimpse of how intolerable establishments reduce their critics to non-persons." Much of Sahgal's later fiction has dealt with the politics of post-Independence India and the changes in lifestyles and attitudes that beset the urban elite. Sahgal's sardonic and evocative descriptions of contemporary India and its corrupt politics have won her wide acclaim in India, where she is also well known as a political journalist and civil liberties activist.

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