Imatges de pÓgina
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EPHESIANS:

WITH A CRITICAL AND GRAMMATICAL

COMMENTARY,

AND A REVISED TRANSLATION,

BY

CHARLES J. ELLICOTT D.D.

BISHOP OF GLOUCESTER AND BRISTOL.

THE THIRD EDITION, CORRECTED.

LONDON:
LONGMAN, GREEN, LONGMAN, ROBERTS & GREEN

1864.

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ADVERTISEMENT TO THE THIRD EDITION.

THE present edition has been revised in the same

way as the third edition of the Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians. A few alterations in reading will be found, especially in chap. i. I, the newly discovered Sinaitic Manuscript having in some cases altered the balance of critical judgments It is much to be desired that the respected Editor of the Manuscript should, if possible, put an end to the doubts which are still allowed to linger round this apparently venerable and trustworthy document.

BRISTOL,

December, 1863.

PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.

HE second edition of the present Epistle is in all respects

similar to the second edition of the Epistle to the Galatians which appeared a few months since, and is brought up, I sincerely hope, fully to the same standard.

It is perhaps right to say that little has been substantially altered, and that the reader of the first edition will scarcely find more than half a dozen passages where the opinions formerly maintained are either retracted or modified; still the additions are great, and the number of notes that have been recast or rewritten by no means inconsiderable. By this means space has been obtained for the introduction of new matter; weaker arguments in contested passages have been made to give place to what might seem to put in a clearer light the stronger argument; logical and grammatical observations have been more grouped, and the links of thought that connect clause with clause or sentence with sentence more studiously exhibited. In this last respect the additions will be found great, and will I trust, by the blessing of God, be of no little use to the reader in properly pursuing the train of sublime thought that runs through this transcendent Epistle. This alas! is the point most commonly neglected in our general study of Scripture: we trust to general impressions and carry away general ideas, but the exact sequence of thought in the mind of the inspired writer is what, I fear, is only too frequently overlooked. It is useless to disguise that this close analysis of the sacred text is very difficult; that it requires a calm judgment and a disciplined

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