Imatges de pàgina
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MARCIAN (Reviving).
No, I kept mine oath,
My rival, having heard my threats, waylaid me,
And, ere I saw him, struck.-What gone?-Both lost?

(Putting his hand into his breast.)

CALANTHE.
Nay be calm, hapless one! they are both safe.

MARCIAN.
They have gone with me everywhere ; his gifts-
I've known the want of bread; but tell my cousin-

CALANTHE.
No names !

MARCIAN.
The only stain upon our name
Is now washed out in blood; but tell him-Lady-
May ye live for each other!-Righteous Heaven!
Forgive me, as I pardon all. My wife!
Oh visit not my death on her! Farewell,
Pure, generous, dear Calanthe! (Dies.)

CALANTHE.
Raise him, friends!
Bear him-Ah, cruel chance! Lord Angelo!
He must not know this. (Covers Marcian's face with his cloak.)

Enter ANGELO.

ANGELO.
A murder? This is no scene for-Calanthe?
Thus kind to all but me! what form is that?
There's more than common pity in thine eye,
This grief, this horror-I were jealous of it-
Yet that coarse garb!

CALANTHE.
It ill becomes you, Signor,
To taunt the wretched, and the dead. Move on!

ANGELO.
They shall not go until I know the truth.

CALANTHE.
Shall not ? 'tis well to wring before this crowd
Confession that must pain me. (Aside.) Holy Truth
Forgive ! yet to my heart he is (To Angelo) my kinsman.

ANGELO.
Alas, Calanthe! hast thou kindred too
Disgraceful to thy name? Can it be so ? (To Citizens.)

FIRST CITIZEN.
I know not, Sir, but on the loftiest trees
Some worthless fruits are found.

CALANTHE.
Forbear! and you,
My Lord, appeal from my word to these men ?
Onwards ! No eye shall dare to look on bim.
(Aside.) Thank Heaven, beloved Angelo! I've spared
Thy proud heart from this shock. (Going.)

ANGELO.
I'll follow thee!

CALANTHE.
Have I no right to choose companions ?
Or need my natural sorrows fear intrusion ?

ANGELO.
Forgive me, I obey.

CALANTHE. 'Tis well; withdraw, Nor question further-I will send you straight Strong proofs, tho' sad ones, that I have not lost The respect due to the Medicii. Farewell! [Exeunt Calanthe and Fabian. Citizens bearing the body.

ANGELO.
There was a softness in that tone-Farewell !
Which crept into her voice, despite herself.
Yet why love hopeless on ? Accursed fate !
My sire hath learnt that to some woman's bounty
I owe his just renewal of affection,
And in his joy, he swears that should he find
This stranger, he would have me wed with her.
While my soul dotes on this unkind Calanthe.

Enter a CITIZEN, hastily.

CITIZEN. My lord! the murderer is taken. Crowds Bear him to justice !

ANGELO.
I shall haste to see
The blood that's shed avenged.

CITIZEN
Sir, you had ever
A most forgiving heart.

ANGELO.
If I forgive
That slayer-

CITIZEN.
Nay, my lord, I spoke in praise,
Nor dared a taunt.

ANGELO.

Who was the murdered man ?

CITIZEN.
My lord ? who ? (Aside.) Ah! he knows not then. Signor
Forgive me-1-

ANGELO.
His name?

CITIZEN. Your pardon, Sir.

[Exit CITIZEN.

ANGELO.
Is then my love so public, that such men
Should seek to cheat me, lest I share her shame?

Re-enter First Citizen.

CITIZEN.
And please you, Sir, entrusted with some gear
Which he who died set value on, I followed,
But, ere I could restore it to the Lady,
Her page, who watched you from a lattice, sent me
To wait her here. I guess not his intent.
He said, if I had duties otherwhere,
I might consign the toys to you, and added,
That, for another game of muffled faces,
You might assume my hat and cloak, his mistress
Will seek me on this spot, and find-my lord.

ANGELO.
What scenes will tame the cunning of a page ?
This is no season for his tricks and schemes.
Yet I would see these treasures.

citizen.
They are here, Sir. (Giving Angelo the Tablets and Jewel.)

ANGELO. My gifts to Marcian!

CITIZEN.

The stranger said
He had known want, but ne'er would part with these.

ANGELO.
Was he not like me?

CITIZEN.
Oh, his locks were grey,
His features swollen and pale, his form so wasted,
Stooping, and ill arrayed, his eyes so dim-

ANGELO.
The truth! yet he was like me? Ay, the Tablets !
Traced in the once familiar hand. What's here? (Reads.)
“ Angelo, my dear kinsman, who for me
Didst risk a parent's anger, know Calanthe,
Who feigns such scorn, lest thou shouldst match beneath thee,
Was she who did in secret pay that debt."

Great Saints! 'twas he then. Dead? and she concealed
The truth from me, from all, and chid me from her
So harshly, but to save my name, my heart !
Good friend, tell all thy fellows that Calanthe
Hath no disgraceful kindred. My poor cousin
Was he who fell. Marcian de Medici !
My father's threats convert to promises !
I'll add a line here, for her. Wily Page!
I thank thee now. Let me requite thee too.
This for thy bonnet and thy mantle, friend.-(Gives Citizen a purse,
and assumes his hat and cloak.)

[Exit Citizen.
[Exit

Re-enter CALANTHE and Fabian.

CALANTHE.
(To Angelo.) Hold'st thou a tablet, and a jewel for me?-(He bows.)
Bear them with speed to the de Medicii,
They should be now lord Angelo's.

FABIAN.
The Tablets ?
May not, I know all now, remember ! say,
May not what Marcian wrote there be unfit
To meet the eye of Angelo ?

CALANTHE.
Thou’rt right!-(Takes the Tablets from ANGELO.)
I will look to it, and efface it-if- (Reads.)
Oh yes, yes! Angelo must ne'er see this.
And what's beneath? Is't the same hand ? “ Calanthe
My benefactress ! 'tis my Sire's command,
My heart's fond wish, that I should call thee mine."
Ha! Churl! is this thy trust? into whose hand
Since I departed, hast thou given these tablets ?

ANGELO.
Into the hand which holds the heart of Angelo!
The hand which must be mine.-(Throwing off his disguise.)

FABIAN

Oh joy, my lord !
She loves you.

ANGELO.
Dost thou love me, perfect creature ?
Wilt thou be mine?

CALANTHE.
To find thy worth unclouded,
And hope thy sire-- this is no time-no place
I'm faint. I've witnessed death, indeed, indeed,
I've been unfairly caught-Oh, Angelo !-

(Falls into his arms).

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EXTRACTS FROM THE OLD FOREST RANGER'S PRIVATE JOURNAL.*

CHAPTER IV.

PALANQUIN TRAVELLING-CHITT LEDROOG-INTERVIEW WITH THE PATELL-A

BREAK-DOWN IN THE JUNGLE-REPAIRINC DAMAGES-CANTONMENT OF HURRYHUR-A NIGHT ATTACK-ARRIVAL AT DHARWAR-MY FIRST TIGERHUNT-DEATH OF A BEATER-APATHY OF THE NATIVES-DIMENSIONS OF A TIGER.

BANGALORE, 13th February. It is only five months since I landed in India, and I have already been fortunate enough to obtain leave of absence to visit my Brother, at Dharwar, in the Bombay Presidency, about 280 miles from hence. I have not yet seen anything of the grander field sports of India, our exploits, at Bangalore, having been confined to coursing Jackalls, shooting snipe and quail, and “ larding the lean earth" in our futile attempts to circumvent a certain herd of very shy Antelope, which being the only animals of the kind within ten miles of the Station, are proportionately careful of themselves, and appear to have no stomach for “ eating bullets.” Inshallah! they have laughed at our beards.-But, from the account my Brother gives of the country in the neighbourhood of Dharwar, I expect better sport before long.

I sent on my Servants, baggage and Horses, some days ago, to Hurryhur, a military station on the banks of the Toombudrah, 185 miles from hence; and start to-morrow night, in a palanquin, to travel dawk, that is with posted Bearers, who travel day and night, each set running a stage of from 10 to 15 miles. Travelling with a single set of Bearers, who carry you from 25 to 30 miles a night, and halt during the day, is cheaper, and a pleasanter mode of performing a journey, as it gives the traveller an opportunity of seeing the country, and keeping himself in game; but it is much slower, and, my leave being limited, I do not like to lose time by the way.

My Brother is to meet me at Hurryhur, and from thence we march, by easy stages, to Dharwar-95 miles-hunting as we go.

On the night of the 14th of February I started from Bangalore, by torchlight, and posted on, without halting, 137 miles, to Chittledroog, a fortified town, and strong hill fort, belonging to the Rajah of Mysore, where I arrived on the afternoon of the 16th.

As I passed through the Fort gate, I was accosted, in tolerable English, by a respectable looking Native, who, after performing sundry very low salaams, and assuring me that, “ My Lordship's footsteps were welcome,” begged to know whether Sahib would be pleased to alight at the Bungalow, which is kept up by the Rajah for the accommodation of European Travellers, and of which he was the keeper.

After two nights' travelling in a palanquin, the prospect of a few hours' rest, and a comfortable bath, was a temptation not to be resisted, so I thanked my black friend for his polite offer, and was forthwith conducted to the Bungalow.

* Continued from Vol. XCV. page 632.

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