Rambles and Studies in Greece

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Macmillan, 1876 - 321 pāgines
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Pāgina 307 - What leaf-fringed legend haunts about thy shape Of deities or mortals, or of both, In Tempe or the dales of Arcady? What men or gods are these? What maidens loth ? What mad pursuit ? What struggle to escape ? What pipes and timbrels ? What wild ecstasy...
Pāgina 153 - Much that is excellent and divine,' says he,1 'does Athens seem to me to have produced and added to our life, but nothing better than those Mysteries, by which we are formed and moulded from a rude and savage state to humanity ; and indeed in the Mysteries we perceive the real principles of life, and learn not only to live happily, but to die with a fairer hope.
Pāgina 105 - Athens, eclipsed by the splendour of the Acropolis. The prospect from the Irish sanctuary has, indeed, endless contrasts to that from the Pagan stronghold, but they are suggestive contrasts, and such as are not without a certain harmony. The plains around both are framed by mountains, of which the Irish are probably the more picturesque ; and if the light upon the Greek hills is the fairest, the native colour of the Irish is infinitely more rich.
Pāgina 81 - When the traveler reflects how all the Old World's culture culminated in Greece — all Greece in Athens — all Athens in its Acropolis — all the Acropolis in the Parthenon — so much crowds upon the mind confusedly that we look for some enduring monument whereupon we can fasten our thoughts, and from which we can pass as from a visible starting-point into all this history and all this greatness. And at first we look in vain. The shattered pillars and the torn pediments will not bear so great...
Pāgina 105 - Irish sanctuary has, indeed, endless contrasts to that from the Pagan stronghold, but they are suggestive contrasts, and such as are not without a certain harmony. The plains around both are framed by mountains, of which the Irish are probably the more picturesque; and if the light upon the Greek hills is the fairest, the native colour of the Irish is infinitely more rich. So, again, the soil of Attica is light and sandy, whereas the Golden Vale of Tipperary is among the richest in the world. But...
Pāgina 27 - ... stay their praise — which is ever new and ever old, ever fresh in its decay, ever perfect in its ruin, ever living in its death — the Acropolis of Athens. When I saw my dream and longing of many years fulfilled, the first rays of the rising sun had just touched the heights, while the town below was still hid in gloom. Rock, and rampart, and ruined fanes — all were colored...
Pāgina 104 - It was my good fortune, a few months after I had seen the Acropolis, to visit a ruin in Ireland which, to my great surprise, bore many curious resemblances to it — I mean the Rock of Cashel. Both were strongholds of...
Pāgina 235 - But the bays or harbours on either coast are few, and so there was no city able to wrest the commerce of these waters from old Corinth, which held the keys by land of the whole Peloponnesus, and commanded the passage from sea to sea. It is, indeed, wonderful how Corinth did not acquire and maintain the first position in Greece. It may, perhaps, have done so in the days of Periander...
Pāgina 155 - ... translation is the Mysteries was a faith which revealed to them hopeful things about the world to come, and which, not so much as a condition, but as a consequence of this clearer light, this higher faith, made them better citizens and better men. This faith was taught them in the Mysteries through symbols, through prayer and fasting, through wild rejoicings ; but, as Aristotle expressly tells us, it was reached, not by intellectual persuasion, but by a change into a new moral state — in fact,...
Pāgina 286 - ... of the newer Italian operas may even be directly injurious to the character. The more beautifully and perfectly the music corresponds to the words of these productions, the more mischievous they are likely to be. Thus the most perfect of love duets, that in Gounod's Faust, expresses so forcibly in its perpetual suspensions the hunger and longing of passion, that the mind which feeds upon it must inevitably, though perhaps unconsciously, be stimulated in that direction. When, therefore, we hear...

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