Magazine of Natural History, Volum 1

Portada
John Claudius Loudon, Edward Charlesworth, John Denson
Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1837
 

Quč opinen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Passatges populars

Pāgina 80 - ... it seems most natural and simple to believe that, being indisputably indigenous, and being, from its perennial verdure, its longevity, and the durability of its wood, at once an emblem and a specimen of immortality, its branches would be employed by our pagan ancestors, on their first arrival here, as the best substitute for the cypress, to deck the graves of the dead, and for other sacred purposes.
Pāgina 155 - Indians, tracing him by the blood to the water, made diligent search all around the pond, but finding no signs of his exit, finally came to the conclusion that he had sunk and was drowned. As they were at one time standing on the very tree beneath which he was concealed. Brady, understanding their language, was very glad to hear the result of their deliberations, and after they had gone, weary, lame and hungry, he made good his retreat to his own home. His followers also returned in safety.
Pāgina 71 - No towers along the steep ; Her march is o'er the mountain waves, Her home is on the deep. With thunders from her native oak, She quells the floods below, As they roar on the shore When the stormy winds do blow ; When the battle rages loud and long, And the stormy winds do blow.
Pāgina 268 - The first division proposes to familiarize the eye to those relations of all natural objects which form the basis of argument in Dr. Paley's Natural Theology : to induce a mental habit of associating the view of natural phenomena with the conviction that they are the media of divine manifestation: and, by such association, to give proper dignity to every branch of natural science.
Pāgina 266 - As by their choice collections may appear, Of what is rare in land, in seas, in air ; Whilst they (as Homer's Iliad in a nut) A world of wonders in one closet shut. These famous antiquarians — that had been Both gardeners to the Rose and Lily queen — Transplanted now themselves, sleep here. And when Angels...
Pāgina 450 - M. alba, at the same period, the throat and head alone are of this colour, the back and the rest of the upper surface being of a light ash grey. In winter the two species more nearly assimilate in their colouring, and this circumstance has doubtless been the cause of their hitherto being considered identical, the black back of 3f.
Pāgina 585 - A lady in the house undertook to be its nurse, placed it in her bosom, and as it began to revive, dissolved a little sugar in her mouth, into which she thrust its bill, and it sucked with great avidity. In this manner it was brought up until fit for the cage.
Pāgina 266 - Art and Nature through, As by their choice collections may appear Of what is rare in Land, in Sea, in Air, Whilst they (as Homer's Iliad in a nut) A world of wonders in one closet shut. These famous Antiquarians that had been Both gardeners to the Rose and Lily Queen...
Pāgina 381 - ... we have seen, year after year, the objects of our fiercest hostility and of our fondest affections lie down together in the hallowed peace of the...
Pāgina 585 - The singularity of this little bird has induced many persons to attempt to raise them from the nest, and accustom them to the cage. Mr. Coffer, of Fairfax county, Virginia, a gentleman who has paid great attention to the manners and peculiarities of our native birds, told me, that he raised and kept two, for some months, in a cage; supplying them with honey dissolved in water, on which they readily fed.

Informaciķ bibliogrāfica