Imatges de pÓgina
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one instance may elucidate. For instance, in his copy of the Nicomachian Ethics, the following passage occurs, thus amended.

"Science is the knowledge of things necessary. Pre-science is the presence of things essential.

As this mode originated in the psychic depths, so the result of such treatment upon the speaker's or reader's mind was almost sure to be the opening of a new and deeper vein of thought, not unfrequently preparatory to the germination of new being. Terminologies were rent asunder, and by this flexible and fluent pouring in of an essential, vital meaning to any phraseology, he at once was preserved from sinking into the narrowness and miserable fixedness of a verbal philosophy, and opened to every author a higher value than he originally designed for his own words.

It was with the intention of a public benefit by this process, that in the year 1827 the Contrasting Magazine was published for a short period. The following extracts will in some degree exemplify the corrections which he would have suggested to the respective authors, though it may be remarked that in subsequent years he would have given a still deeper rendering to many passages.

LOCKE ON THE CONDUCT OF THE UNDERSTANDING.

INTRODUCTION.

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The last resort a man has recourse to, in the conduct of himself, is his understanding. For though we distinguish the faculties of the mind, and give the supreme command to the will, as to an agent, yet the truth is, the man, which is the agent, determines himself, to this or that voluntary action, upon some precedent knowledge, or appearance of knowledge, in the understanding.

No man ever sets himself about anything but upon some view or other which serves him for a reason for what he does. And whatsoever faculties he employs, the understanding, with such light as it has, well or ill informed, constantly leads; and by that light, true or

SECTION I.

The last resort a man ought to have recourse to, in the conduct of himself, is his understanding. For though we distinguish the faculties of the mind, and attribute the clearest conception to the understanding, as to the distinctive faculty; yet, the true course of nature is the man, which is the agent, ought to determine himself to this or that voluntary action, upon some primitive motive in the feelings, which can never be an apparent one. No man ever should set himself about anything upon some view or other, and thus make the effect of what he does, serve him for a reason for what he does; and whatsoever faculties then he employs, the feelings, with that love which must be developed in them,

false, all his operative powers are ought constantly to lead; and, by directed. the light in the understanding, the operative powers ought only to be ruled. The will itself, how loving and disinterested soever it may be thought, must always fail, if obedient to the dictates of the understanding. Schools have their sacred rules, and we see what influence they have always had over a great But, in truth, part of mankind. the faith and love in men's minds are the invisible powers that constantly ought to govern them, and, to these alone, truly developed minds pay a ready submission. It is therefore of the highest concernment, that great care should be taken of the feelings, to conduct them right in the development of their faith, and in the love from which they act.

The will itself, how absolute and uncontrollable soever it may be thought, never fails in its obedience to the dictates of the understanding. Temples have their sacred images, and we see what influence they have always had over a great part of mankind. But, in truth, the ideas and images in men's minds are the visible powers that constantly govern them, and to these they all universally pay a ready submission. It is therefore of the highest concernment, that great care should be taken of the understand ing, to conduct it right in the search of knowledge and in the judgments it makes.

SERMON BY T. WAITE, D. C. L.

From the Sacred Scriptures alone have the knowledge of God and the practice of true religion, in all ages, been derived; for where divine revelation has not been known, the worship of the true God, and an uniform observation of the duties of morality, have never existed.

From the development of the divine germ in man alone have the knowledge of God and the practice of true religion, in all ages, been indrawn; for where the divine germ in man has not been developed, though the Sacred Scriptures have been known, the true worship of God, and an uniform observation of the duties of godliness, have never existed.

SWEDENBORG'S HEAVENLY MYSTERIES.

Amongst other wonderful things experienced in another life, are to be reckoned perceptions, of which there are two kinds. One that is angelic, consisting in the perception of what is true and good, and of what is from the Lord, and what from self; and also in the perception of the ground and quality of thoughts, words, and actions. The other kind is what is common to all, but is enjoyed by the angels in the highest perfection, and by spirits, according to the quality of each; consisting in this, that they discern the

NOS. 1383 ET SEQ.

Amongst other spiritual but little observed things experienced in man's interior life, are to be reckoned intuitions, of which there are two kinds. One that is divine, consisting in the intuition of the source of all truth und goodness, and the distinction between the divine principle and the principle of selfishness, and thereby in the intuition of the ground and quality of thoughts, words, and actions. The other kind is the human intuition, which never arrives at full clearness, except by the presence of the divine nature,

GENESIS. CHAPTER XII.

nature and temper of another, the and is proportionate in every indiinstant he appears in view. vidual to the degree of his interior development; consisting in this, that we discern our own nature and character the instant we turn our view inwards.

There are spirits who belong to the province of the skin, especially that part of it which is rough and scaly, who are disposed to reason on all subjects, having no perception of what is good and true. Nay, the more they reason, the less perception they have, inasmuch as they suppose wisdom to consist in reasoning, and in appearing to be

wise.

I have sometimes discoursed concerning perception with those in another life, who, during their abode in the world, supposed themselves able to penetrate into all things, and to understand that the angels perceive, that they think and speak, will and act from the Lord, but still they were not able to conceive what perception is; supposing, that if all things thus entered by influx, they would be deprived thereby of all life, because thus they would think nothing from themselves, or their own propriety, in which they conceived all life to consist.

There are men who attach themselves to exterior things, especially to all such as are visible and palpable, who are disposed to reason on all subjects, having no intuition of what is good and true. Nay, the more they reason, the less intuition they have, inasmuch as arguing often suppresses wisdom, putting on its appearance only.

I have sometimes discoursed concerning intuition with men confined to exterior life, who, in consequence of the experience they have acquired, suppose themselves able to penetrate into all things, and to understand that man may be taught by the spirit of God, so as to think and speak, will and act, from the Lord; but still they were not able to conceive what intuition is, supposing that if all ideas thus were to be derived from a divine power within them, they would be deprived thereby of all life, because thus they would think nothing from themselves, or their own essence, in which they conceived all life to consist.

These contrasts were not limited to authors with whose doctrines he might wholly or in part disagree, but were bestowed upon such as he justly admired. For instance, William Law, whose writings every profound, as well as merely talented reader will acknowledge as first of their class, did not fail to excite his pen to this coördinate commentary, and the greater depth of the writer was not the hindrance to his fluency, but the more certain invitation. Two writers only appear to have remained uncontrasted in his library, namely, Plato and Behmen; but these he read when it was his custom to make marginal notes: thus in Behmen's "True Regeneration," chap. 3, sec. 12.

"Thus the creature stirreth up with its desire, good and evil,

life and death. The human angelical desire standeth in the centre of the eternal nature, which is without beginning, and wherein it kindleth itself, whether in good or in evil, it accomplisheth its work in that."

NOTE. An increase of happiness comes to man, when his state of regeneration is such, that he can decompose the air in which he lives, and hold in solution and precipitation just that which is suitable to his active and passive existence. J. P. G.

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From his own manuscript records it is not easy to select passages, which should raise in the reader's mind those glowing sensations and kindling sensibilities, those superrational convictions of a supreme inliving love-power, which his own peculiar emphasis and the flash from his singularly bright eye were almost sure to effect. Every hearer felt that those penetrating orbs were not employed to scan body, but were as well inlets as outlets to soul. Each became more or less conscious that he was seen. His presence was not an ordinary event. Neither his word nor his mere company could pass for nothing. His entrance into a party, how numerous soever, was acknowledged in an actual sympathy, if not in words. There needed not the science of phrenology to impress the beholder with the fact, that the exalted head, the towering, expansive brow denoted a being of unusual character. Nor could so benign a mouth, so well rounded a chin, and a nose of fair dimensions, slightly Roman or aquiline, require a Lavater to assure us that a heart was there, not cast in the every-day mould for every-day traffic. He was indeed formed for the manifestation of love in the deepest sense, and had there not been born in him a profound consciousness of universal duty, which transcended all thought of individual affection, his friendships alone would have rendered him an associate of the most attractive kind.

We require of such a being that he should be robed. He carries us inward to that ideal which we see represented outwardly in the Grecian statue. The plain blue coat and vulgar neckerchief do not satisfy our notion of external propriety. And when in Mr. Greaves these mental indications exist in companionship with a robust frame, of goodly height, the impression produced on the auditory when he rose, at the close of the conversations held at his house, to

sum up the sentiments expressed during the evening, and to bind them in one offering to the Spirit, which is by true seeking to be found in every bosom, could only be enhanced by those delicious tones, trembling occasionally on the verge of treble, and those deep aspirations which all must feel were true indications of the soul's more real ardency.

Amongst the publications issued by him, and which were either wholly written by him, or consisting of his closer manuscripts a little amplified or diluted by some literary coadjutor, were two small volumes; one entitled, "Three hundred Maxims for the consideration of Parents," and the other, "Physical and Metaphysical Hints for Every Body." The former has found a rather extensive circulation, as it was written in a mode appealing to, and calculated to reach the mother's heart. It afterwards arrived at a second edition, besides the approval of an American reprint, under the title, "Thoughts on Spiritual Culture," with some additional matter. A larger volume was also presented to the world in the year 1827, consisting of Pestalozzi's Letters to himself, agreeably translated from the German by Dr. Worms, but not with that strict fidelity which they deserved. It is a feeling with some literary men, that it is their duty rather to write down to the supposed position of the public, than to adhere as strictly as possible to the high truths given them to utter. The latter only is the faithful and dutiful course; for the greatest breach in faith is manifested in the supposition, that what is spoken from the depths of the sincere mind will not be heard in a corresponding manner.

The great design in these efforts was to reawaken in the public mind the fact, that man must not only believe, not only be convinced, but feel with the same certitude with which he feels his own existence; that there is one universal love-truth, which is the same to all individuals, at all times, in all places, and under all circumstances. That man must feel that this love-truth is not a dead word, nor a thought to be defined, or described, or expressed in dead words, but that it is the ONE living SPIRIT manifesting itself in all things; in the works of nature, in the clear thoughts, in the noble sensations of the human soul. That man must feel this living Love-Spirit has an abode within, and that

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