Scanderbeg: Or, Love and Liberty: A Tragedy

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W. Reeve, 1747 - 320 pāgines
 

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Pāgina 140 - He had by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company, and amongst them, some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing engaged him more than once in robbing a park that belonged to Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, near Stratford.
Pāgina 142 - Mr. Jonson, who was at that time altogether unknown to the world, had offered one of his plays to the players, in order to have it acted ; and the persons into whose hands it was put, after having turned it carelessly and superciliously over, were just upon returning it to him with an ill-natured answer, that it would be of no service to their company ; when...
Pāgina 147 - His wit was in his own power; would the rule of it had been so too. Many times he fell into those things could not escape laughter, as when he said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him, "Caesar, thou dost me wrong," he replied, "Caesar did never wrong but with just cause"; and such like, which were ridiculous.
Pāgina 142 - His Acquaintance with Ben Johnson began with a remarkable piece of Humanity and good Nature; Mr Johnson, who was at that Time altogether unknown to the World, had offer'd one of his Plays to the Players, in order to have it...
Pāgina 140 - He was received into the company then in being, at first in a very mean rank ; but his admirable wit, and the natural turn of it to the stage, soon distinguished him, if not as an extraordinary actor, yet as an excellent writer.
Pāgina 140 - Perhaps we are not to look for his beginnings, like those of other authors, among their least perfect writings ; art had so little, and nature so large a share in what he did, that, for aught I know...
Pāgina 222 - I will say but one word more in general of his writings, which is, that what he has done in any one species, or distinct kind, would have been sufficient to have acquired him a great name. If he had written nothing but his prefaces, or nothing but his songs or his prologues, each of them would have entitled him to the preference and distinction of excelling in his kind.
Pāgina 139 - ... he was his eldest son, he could give him no better education than his own employment.
Pāgina 221 - Indeed, it is to be regretted, that he was rather blameable in the other extreme; for, by that means, he was personally less known, and, consequently, his character might become liable both to misapprehensions and misrepresentations.
Pāgina 221 - ... last, even to near seventy years of age, improving even in fire and imagination, as well as in judgment; witness his Ode on St Cecilia's Day, and his Fables, his latest performances.

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