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Remarks on the Repairs of Westminster Abbey. (June, pearance of the tomb itself, could pre- rest by carpets; and the centre of the serve it from one of the most wanton Choir is occupied by seats for certain and ridiculous degradations which the young gentlemen in plain clothes, hands of innovators have ever inflicted who formerly set nearer the altar. An upon the remains of antiquity; it has open space

in the centre of the Choir been painted black, and now literally of a Cathedral Church has hitherto looks like a fire-place, and will no been held indispensible, and I believe doubt be shewn for one in a few years. this is the first instance of such a

The altar-tomb and effigy, of the space being filled up with benchesDuchess of York, in St. Nicholas's

an arrangement very inconsistent with Chapel, have suffered severely; all the the Cathedral service still heard from sharp lines and angles have been de- the stalls. The Antiquary views the stroyed, and every ornamental part progress of innovation with alarm, mutilated; it now exhibits a complete which if not umely arrested, may depicture of decay, as, indeed, all which grade this noble Church in a mere have been washed whose material was private Chapel. The nave is entirely not marble do; this would not have shut_up, and rendered useless; and happened if the dust had been re- the Poet's Corner, with one of the moved with a brush, as the well- entrances from the Cloister, are the known softness of the stone of which only doors reserved for the congrega. ancient monuments are in general tion, so that it will be seen that the formed, renders them liable to destruc- largest proportion of the Church is tion and mutilation if too roughly rendered, by these new-fangled reguhandled. The iron rails which sur- lations, of no manner of use. rounded the tomb of Edward the First, In the spandrils of the blank arches, and which had an original bust of that in the North transept and elsewhere monarch, have been taken away, on that side of the Church, are carved making this plain tomb look still more some very curious specimens of sculpmean than it did before.

ture coeval with the foundation of the If these repairers had collected the Abbey by Henry III. In order to set reinains of monuments which are off the modern monumental lumber, scattered in different parts of the the walls and pillars of the Abbey Church, and restored the to their have been covered with a bluish comoriginal places, instead of suffering position, more particularly glaring in them to lay about as rubbish, they the Western aile of the North transept, would have performed a laudable work, which appears as if it had been smear. and the term “ restoration” might ed over with mud - this operation of then have been used with propriety. course has not improved the sculptures, Among these remains are the etfigy of on the contrary they now present an a lady of James's time on the monu- appearance of mutilation and decay ment of Bp. Dudley, part of a twisted much to be regretted. However carepillar of the shrine of St. Edward, ful these restorers may have been in great remains of the magnificent though washing the faces of musical cherubs desaced monuments on the North side and whimpering genii, they certainly of the altar, and many others. The deserve no credit for defacing specistone coffin still lays on the tomb of · mens of ancient carving, so curious Abbot Fascet, as it has done for years. and ancient as the present were. Why have not the restorers removed it Here, Mr. Urban, I close my reto a more appropriate situation? surely marks; enough, I trust, has been said the Abbey Church is not so much 10 shew that these restorations do not straitened' for room as to render it on the whole reflect rory great credit necessary to pile one monument upon on those who have superintended them. another, like stones in a mason's yard! The altar screen is not yet restored ;

From the monuments I turn to the but it is, I understand, in contempla- Church, and here I must remark that tion to do so, as also to let into view little has been done to embellish, much the tombs at the sides of it, once more to deface it. The Choir decorations 10“ make a glorious appearance from (a burlesque on pointed architecture), the altar." If this is accomplished in are replaced, and the Coronation pulpit, a proper manner, it will add greatly divested of its finery, reinains; great to the beauty of the choir; but taking part of the beautiful mosaic pavement the restorations already done, as of the altar is hid by Nooring, and the sample for those in anticipation, the

Antiquary,

2

1892.] Instances of Sagacity in the Brute Creation.

505 Antiquary, I fear, must only view this terms, some other instances of sagadesirable improvement in his mind's city in the brute creation, which have cye, and hope for its accomplishment fallen within my own observation, or in a period when the beauties of an- have been related to me by persons of tient buildings are more duly appre- unquestionable veracity. ciated than they are in the present. When I was last in London, only a Yours, &c.

E. I. C. few days since, I saw a dog of a mean

character and very ordinary descrip

tion, something of the old turnspit Mr. URBAN,

June 4. breed, harnessed in the usual manner N TEXT to the reason of man in the beneath a small baker's cart, using his

wonders of natural organization, best strength, and seeming to delight is the condition of the intellectual in his office in drawing a heavy burpower as modified in the instincts of then for his indolent master, who ran Brutes.

whistling by the side, guiding the maA friend lately returned from India, chine, and preventing an occasional who is too veracious to take advantage overthrow that might have been otherof the traveller's privilege! assures me wise expected. The man stopped 10 that he has seen Elephants employed serve his customers; the harness was to pile wood, who have, after adding so contrived that the dog immediately heap to heap, drawn back and placed extricaled himself from his trammels, themselves in a situation to see if they and ran to and fro barking loudly, and have kept a perpendicular lire and pre- appearing, as I conceived,

to rejoice in served a just level in their work, and his unexpected liberty. The baker's have then corrected any perceptible business ended; he whistled shrilly; defect in one or the other. The same the dog instantly left his companions, person has seen two Elephants em- with whom he was engaged at a disployed to roll barrells to a distance; tance,-threw his head into the coloné has kept them in motion, while lar, introduced his body into the harthe other has been prepared with a ness most ingeniously, without the stone in its trunk to stop their progress least assistance, and went to work with at the required spot.

evident pleasure. I had the curiosity The common tricks taught to the to follow, and saw this creature do the young Elephants which are exhibited same thing repeatedly. He received in this country for public entertain- occasionally a few caresses and a crust ment, show a capacity of intellect far as a recompence and encouragement, beyond the measure of the ordinary and was always ready and willing at power in the brute creation. Every his master's call. different animal is endowed by nature When a boy at Harrow School, I with that peculiar sense which is had myself a dog of very superior abiadapted to his peculiar wants, and lities; one of his great merits, in the when we remark'a refinement in this opinion of our sporting companions, gift raising the brute I might almost was the manner in which he attemptsay above the level of his condition, on ed and always succeeded in drawing the scale of creation, we cannot resist a badger from his tub or dew. I have the full tide of admiration that bursts seen him advance with his tail forein upon us, and overwhelms the heart most, and his body slightly curved close with sentiments of praise and rever- to the nose of his intended victim, and ence.

then as the poor beast would vindicate Brutes always follow where instinct his domestic rights, and begin to fight leads, and in so doing never err against for his home, on the first attack, turn nature. Man spoils or defies the power rapidly round, seize fast on the neck of reason, and falls into irretrievable or the ear of the enemy, and in an indifficulties. Hence it has been lightly stant draw him into light. observed by some that instinct is in Although of the smaller kind of truth the better gift;—but where then terrier, he was so fleet of foot, that he are the hopes which reason perceives constantly outran a small pack of rabof better things ? and where the pro- bit beagles, with which we were occamise of immortality ?

sionally used to relax, after the severer But to pursue my proposed plan, al- studies of Homer and Longinus. Every low me to relate in plain and familiar art was tried to retard his progress, but Gent. Mag. June, 1822.

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504

Remarks on the Repairs of Westminster Abbey. (June, pearance of the tomb itself, could pre- rest by carpets; and the centre of the serve it from one of the most wanton Choir is occupied by seats for certain and ridiculous degradations which the young gentlemen in plain clothes, hands of innovators have ever inflicted who formerly set nearer the altar. An upon the remains of antiquity; it has open space in the centre of the Choir been painted black, and now literally of a Cathedral Church has hitherto looks like a fire-place, and will no been held indispensible, and I believe doubt be shewn for one in a few years. this is the first instance of such a

The altar-tomb and effigy of the space being filled up with benchesDuchess of York, in St. Nicholas's

an arrangement very inconsistent with Chapel, have suffered severely; all the the Cathedral service still heard from sharp lines and angles have been de- the stalls. The Antiquary views the stroyed, and every ornamental part progress of innovation with alarm, mutilated; it now exhibits a complete which if not timely arrested, may depicture of decay, as, indeed, all which grade this noble Church in a mere have been washed whose material was private Chapel. The nave is entirely not marble do; this would not have shut_up, and rendered useless ; and happened if the dust had been re- the Poet's Corner, with one of the moved with a brush, as the well- entrances from the Cloister, are the known softness of the stone of which only doors reserved for the congrega. ancient monuments are in general tion, so that it will be seen that the formed, renders them liable to destruc- largest proportion of the Church is tion and mutilation if too roughly rendered, by these new-fangled reguhandled. The iron rails which sur lations, of no manner of use. rounded the tomb of Edward the First, In the spandrils of the blank arches, ' and which had an original bust of that in the North transept and elsewhere monarch, have been taken away, on that side of the Church, are carved making this plain tomb look still more some very curious specimens of sculpmean than it did before.

ture coeval with the foundation of the If these repairers had collected the Abbey by Henry III. In order to set reinains of monuments which are off the modern monumental lumber

, scattered in different parts of the the walls and pillars of the Abbey Church, and restored them to their have been covered with a bluish comoriginal places, instead of suffering position, more particularly glaring in them to lay about as rubbish, they the Western aile of the North transept, would have performed a laudable work, which appears as if it had been smcar. and the term “ restoration” might ed over with mud--this operation of then have been used with propriety. course has not improved the sculptures, Among these remains are the effigy of on the contrary they now present an a lady of James's time on the monu

appearance of mutilation and decay ment of Bp. Dudley, part of a twisted much to be regretted. However carepillar of the shrine of St. Edward, ful these restorers may have been in great reinains of the magnificent though washing the faces of musical cherubs defaced monuments on the North side and whimpering genii, they certainly of the altar, and many others. The deserve no credit for defacing specistone coffin still lays on the tomb of• mens of ancient carving, so curious Abbot Fascet, as it has done for years. and ancient as the present were. Why have not the restorers removed it Here, Mr. Urban, I close my reto a inore appropriate situation? surely marks ; enough, I trust

, has been said the Abbey Church is not so much to shew that these restorations do not straitened' for room as to render it on the whole reflect very great credit necessary to pile one monument upon on those who have superintended then. another, like stones in a mason's yard! The altar screen is not yet restored ;

From the monuments I turn to the but it is, I understand, in contempla- Church, and here I must remark that tion to do so, as also to let into view

little has been done to embellish, much the tombs at the sides of it, once more to deface it. The Choir decorations to “ make a glorious appearance from (a burlesque on pointed architecture), the altar.” If this is accomplished in are replaced, and the Coronation pulpit, a proper manner, it will add greatly divested of its finery, remains; great to the beauty of the choir; but taking part of the beautiful mosaic pavement the restorations already done, as a of the altar is hid by Nooring, and the sample for those in anticipation, the

Antiquary,

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1999.] Instances of Sagacity in the Brute Creation,

505 Antiquary, I fear, must only view this terms, some other instances of sagadesirable improvement in his mind's city in the brute creation, which have eye, and hope for its accomplishment fallen within my own observation, or in a period when the beauties of an- have been related to me by persons of cient buildings are more duly appre- unquestionable veracity: ciated than they are in the present. When I was last in London, only a Yours, &c.

E. I. C. few days since, I saw a dog of a mean

cliaracter and very ordinary descrip

tion, something of the old turnspit Mr. URBAN,

June 4. breed, harnessed in the usual manner TEXT to the reason of man in the beneath a small baker's cart, using his

, is the condition of the intellectual in his office in drawing a heavy bur. power as modified in the instincts of then for his indolent master, who ran Brutes.

whistling by the side, guiding the maA friend lately returned from India, chine, and preventing an occasional who is too veracious to take advantage overthrow that might have been otherof the traveller's privilege! assures me wise expected. The man stopped 10 that he has seen Elephants employed serve his customers; the harness was to pile wood, who have, after adding so contrived that the dog immediately heap to heap, drawn back and placed extricated himself from his trammels, themselves in a situation to see if they and ran to and fro barking loudly, and have kept a perpendicular line and pre- appearing, as I conceived, to rejoice in served a just level in their work, and his unexpected liberty. The baker's have then corrected any perceptible business ended; he whistled shrilly; defect in one or the other. The same the dog instantly left his companions, person has seen iwo Elephants em- with whom he was engaged at a disployed to roll barrells to a distance; tance,--threw his head into the colone has kept them in motion, while far, introduced his body into the harthe other has been prepared with a ness most ingeniously, without the stone in its trunk to stop their progress least assistance, and went to work with at the required spot:

evident pleasure. I had the curiosity The common tricks taught to the to follow, and saw this creature do the young Elephants which are exhibited

same thing repeatedly. He received in this country for public entertain- occasionally a few caresses and a crust ment, show a capacity of intellect far as a recompence and encouragement, beyond the measure of the ordinary and was always ready and willing at power in the brute creation. Every his master's call. different animal is endowed by nature When a boy at Harrow School, I with that peculiar sense which is had myself a dog of very superior abiadapted to his peculiar wants, and lities; one of his great merits, in the when we remark'a refinement in this opinion of our sporting companions, gift raising the brute I might almost was the manner in which he attemptsay above the level of his condition, on ed and always succeeded in drawing the scale of creation, we cannot resist a badger from his tub or dew I have the full tide of admiration that bursts seen him advance with his tail fore. in upon us, and overwhelms the heart most, and his body slightly curved close with sentiments of praise and rever- to the nose of his intended victim, and

then as the poor beast would vindicate Brutes always follow where instinct his domestic rights, and begin to fighi leads, and in so doing never err against for his home, on the first attack, turn nature. Man spoils or defies the power rapidly round, seize fast on the neck of reason, and falls into irretrievable or the ear of the enemy, and in an in. difficulties. Hence it has been lightly stant draw him into light. observed by some that instinct is in Although of the smaller kind o truth the better gift;—but where then terrier, he was so fleet of foot, that hi are the hopes which reason perceives constantly outran a small pack of rab of better things ? and where the pro- bit beagles, with which we were occa mise of immortality?

sionally used to relax, after the severe But to pursue my proposed plan, al- studies of Homer and Longinus. Ever low me to relate in plain and familiar art was tried to retard his progress, bu Gent. Mag. June, 1892.

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506
Sagacity of Dogs.-Winchester Palace.

(June, 10 no purpose ; as a last resource, a nary, places of resort in London,light clog was affixed to his collar, would remain with us, perhaps, some which, as he ran, becoming entangled ten days or more, and then without a between his legs, gave him many an companion, without attaching himself awkward somerset, and prevented his to any occasional traveller, as was at loo rapid course; but this was only first supposed, would journey up to successful for a time; he soon perceived London, - pass one week at the St. how to overcome this impediment; he James's Coffee House, and another at would stop short the moment the game the Prince of Wales's, and then rewas started, take up the pendent clog turn to us with the most perfect nonin his mouth, and then as usual out- chalance, and the most easy familiarity strip all his companions in the chace. possible. After another short interval

We had a dog at Cambridge, the he would make a visit to bis old masproperty of my friend M. who chose ter in Suffolk, remain just so long as what Terms he would keep, and lived he felt disposed to do so, and come just as much of a college lite as pleased back to us with a saucy countenance, himself, and no more ; he knew his which absolutely seemed to speak good master's home in Suffolk, and his ordi- humour and independence. D.

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The house obtained an Act of Parlia-
CHE present Bishop of Winches- vicinity of London. It is, therefore,

our intention to give a brief account ment to enable him to sell the Epis- of this Palace, and thus to preserve its copal Palace at Chelsea, belonging to form and structure, when every vesthe See of Winchester. Agreeably to tige of it shall be totally destroyed. the provisions of this Act, his Lord- Before we enter upon a descripship has since disposed of the Palace tion of the building, it may be amusand premises for six thousand pounds, ing to recite a few particulars reto the Trustees of the Lords of the lative to the means by which this Manor.

house came into the possession of the It is said to be the intention of the See of Winchester, and to relate a few Trustees to apply for another Act of biographical anecdotes of those illusParliament to enable them to build on trious prelates who have successively the adjoining glehe land, and to form a resided within its walls. new street from Cheyne-walk to the The antient Palace of the Bishops King's Private Road.

of Winchester in Southwark, having Ai one time it was reported that been greatly dilapidated during the Government had taken the premises Civil Wars, an Act of Parliament was with an intention of converting them passed in the year 1663, to empower into an hospital for sick soldiers: what. George Morley, Bishop of Winchesever may be the final destination of ter, to lease out the houses in Souththis venerable edifce, it must excitewark, and for other purposes, as is exthe regret of the Architect as well as pressed at large in the Act; of which Antiquary, to witness the gradual de- the following is the title:-"Anno 15 molition of every antient fabrick in the Car. II. 5 July 1663, An Act to ena

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