A Practical Grammar of the Sanskrit Language: Arranged with Reference to the Classical Languages of Europe, for the Use of English Students

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Clarendon Press, 1877 - 417 pàgines

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Pàgina 373 - Let the student, therefore, distinguish between the infiinitive of Sanskrit and that of Latin and Greek. In these latter languages we have the infinitive made the subject of a proposition; or, in other words, standing in the place of a Nominative and an Accusative case often admissible before it. We have it also assuming different forms, to express present, put, or future time, and completeness or incompleteness in the progress of the action.
Pàgina 373 - We have it abo assuming different forms, to express present, past, or future time, and completeness or incompleteness in the progress of the action. The Sanskrit infinitive, on the other hand, can never be made the subject of a verb, admits of no accusative before it, and can only express indeterminate time and incomplete action. Wherever it occurs it must be considered as the object, and never the subject, of some verb expressed or understood. As the object of the verb, it may be regarded as equivalent...
Pàgina 374 - Bopp considers the termination of the infinitive to be the accusative of the auffix tu (458. Obs.), and it is certain that in the Veda other cases of nouns formed with this suffix in the sense of infinitives occur ; eg a dative in tone or tavai, as from han comes hantave, 'to kill ;' fir. anu-i, anvetave, 'to follow ;' fr. man, mantavai, 'to think :' there is also a form in tos, generally in the sense of an ablative ; eg fr.
Pàgina 374 - And as the object of the verb, it may be regarded as equivalent to an indeclinable substantive, in which the force of two cases, an accusative and dative,* is inherent, and which differs from other substantives in its power of governing a case. Its use as a substantive with the force of the accusative case corresponds to one use of the Latin infinitive ; thus, TTt( Tiff "sfljJH, ^-adllM, " I desire to hear all that," " id audire cupio," where '3Jti£ and audire are both equivalent to accusative cases,...
Pàgina 373 - Sansk rit infinitive, on the other hand, can never be made the subject of a verb, admits of no Accusative before it, and can only express indeterminate time and incomplete action. Wherever it occurs, it must be considered as the object, and never the subject of some verb expressed or understood. As the object of the verb, it may be regarded as equivalent to a verbal substantive, in which the force of two oases, an Accusative and Dative, is inherent and which differs from other substantives in its...
Pàgina 363 - Put in the Sermon to Scholars the brave maxim of the Code of Menu: "A teacher of the Veda should rather die with his learning than sow it in sterile soil, even though he be in grievous distress for subsistence.
Pàgina 330 - This class has no exact parallel in other languages. When two or more persons or things are enumerated together, it is usual in Sanskrit, instead of connecting them by a copulative, to aggregate them into one compound word. No syntactical dependence of one case upon another subsists between the members of Dvandva compounds, since they must always consist of words which, if uncompounded, would be in the same case. The only grammatical connexion between the members is that which would be expressed...
Pàgina 11 - German word baum, or like the ou in our. The consonants are generally pronounced as in English, but g has always the sound of g in gun, give, never of g in gin. S with the accent over it (s) has the sound of j in sure, or of the last s in session. SAKOONTALA PROLOGUE Benediction Isa preserve you ! he who is revealed In these eight forms by man perceptible — Water, of all creation's works the first; The fire that bears on high the sacrifice Presented...
Pàgina 198 - ... fr. tap) are regarded by native grammarians as Átmane verbs of cl. 4 *. Again, many roots appear in class 4 as Intransitive verbs, which also appear in some one of the other nine as Transitive. For example, yuj, ' to join,' when used in a Transitive sense, is conjugated either in cl.

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