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temporary accommodation of vessels entering or leaving ; one at Rownham for large ships, the other below the iron bridge at Bedminster, for vessels under 500 tons. There are several capacious graving-docks, and ship-building is carried on to some extent; the Great Western and Great Britain steam-ships, with the Severn, the Avoli, and others of inferior dimensions having been built in the port. The tide in the Avon sets with great rapidity, especially between the high precipitous rocks of Clifton and Leigh, which scem rent asunder to admit its passage. In Kingroad its rise at springs is between 48 and 49 feet, at neaps above 23 feet: at the gates of the floating harbour it rises from 30 to 33 feet. Previously to the completion, in 1849, of the new lock or entrance to the floating harbour at Cumberland basin, Rownham, vessels occasionally loaded and unloailed in Kingroad, at the mouth of the river, by means of lighters. But the entrance to the basin is now of dimensions sufficient to admit steamers and other ships of the largest class. The port and other dues, which it was formerly imperative to levy on all vessels frequenting the port, whether they entered the new harbour or not, may now be remitted at the discretion of the town council, to those that do not avail themselves of the latter,

Bristol early possessed, and continues to enjoy, a large share of the trade with the West Indies. Among her foreign imports the most important are colonial products, tea, tobacco, timber, grain of all sorts, flour, wine, brandy, tällow, fruits, wool, hemp, dye stuffs, oil, saltpetre, hides, &c. The exports consist principally of the produce of the various manufactures of the city, comprising refined sugar, brasa and copper articles, spirits, glass, earthenware, &c., with salt, coals, and culm, the produce of the neighbourhood ; and, cotton, linen, and wollen goods. Bristol carries on an extensive and growing trade with Ireland, from which she imports, corn butter, bacon, potatoes, cattle, horses, sheep, pigs, sainion, &c. She sends in return, tea, raw and refined sugar, cheese, wrought iron, tin plates, copper, glass, woollens, leather, &c. The imports, coast wise, consist mostly of iron, tin, coal, salt, agricultural produce, and foreign produce, brought from other ports under bond. The exports are chiefly foreign and colonial produce (especially groceries, spirits, and wines), and the various manufactures of the city. A steam communication for the conveyance of goods and passengers to Ireland was established in 1826, and has led to a great increase of the trade with that part of the empire. Bristol had the honour of being the first port in the empire to establish a regular communication by steam with the U. States. The first voyage by the Great Western steam-ship was performed in 1838.

The decline in the comparative importance of Bristol, as a trading emporium, has been chietiy mani. fested by contrasting her progress with that of Liverpool. The average customs duties of Bristol for the seven years ending with 1757, amounted to 155,184. ; those of Liverpool for the same perioul, to 51,1367. In 1784, the customs of Bristol had risen to 334.9091., a great increase; but those of Liverpool had advanced, in the saine year, to 648.6841. ; and in 1816, while the customs duties of the fonner amounted to 919,1491., those of the latter amounted to 3,622,0571. One of the chief causes that hare been cotomenly assigned for this comparative slowness of progress is the excess of local taxation; the town and harbour dues having been much heavier than those of any other of the larger ports.

There can, however, be no doubt, that too much stress has been laid upon this circumstance in arcounting for the slower progress of the trade of this port. The real causes of the rapid rise of Liverpool, Glasgow, and some other sea-port towns is to be found, not in the lowness of their port charges, er in any peculiar advantages they individually enjoy, but in their having become the ports of the great manufacturing districts. The extraordinary growth of Liverpool is a consequence of the still more extraordinary growth of the cotton manufacture. Her rise has been dependent upon, and consequent to, the rise of Manchester. Bolton, Blackburn, &c. Still, however, it is not to be denied that the trade of Bristol was seriously injured by the high charges that were formerly imposed on the shipping frequenting her port. But that grievance, after having been mitigated by various reductions effected since 1835, has at length been wholly obviated ; and the charges on shipping in the Avon are now remarkable for their muderation. This important reform took place in 1848, under the local act 11 & 12 Vict.c. 43 (30 June, 1819), which transferred the property of the docks from the former dock company to the citizens, and ve ted their management in the common council of the city. In consequence of this change, and of the reduction of the rates by which it has been followed, ships that formerly paid 28. and 3s. per ton of dock dues now pay ls, per dó. ; while those that paid Is. now pay 6d.; and those that paid sd, and 6d. now pay 4d. (See foriner rates in last edit. of this work.) All articles not enumerated in the annexed tables are exempted from dock and town duties. And it is of importance to observe that all former charges on ships and goods outwards have been wholly abolished ; so that, as regards exports, Bristol is now an absolutely free po Deck RATES AND DOES ON SHTEPISO ENTERINO TIX PORT For every vessel from Carlit, Nexport, or any oy BKINTOL, THOSE LEAVING THE SAME BEINO YKER OY ALL other port to the eastward of the Hols, one thini Pont CHARGES.

part of the lading of which shall consist of coul,

kcroft, iron, tin, un plates, gram, copper, bricks, Dock Dues.

stone, coal, tar, slate, bark, timber, or wood, as

follows: For every vessel trading from Africa, llonduras, £ s. d. If such vessel shall not exceed 75 tons burthen, Surinam, and other ports in South America, the

for each Foyage U.States of America, the East and West Indies,

If such vessel shall exceed 75 tons burthen, for all the ports within the Straits of Gibraltar, the

each voyage Southen Whale Fishery, the British Colonies,

N. 8. There are no dork rates or other port charges pay. Portugal, Prusia, Russia, Spain, without the Straits, and Sweden. per ton

0 1 0

able on vessels leasing the port of Bristol. And a vettate

unce paid the dock dues on entering the port my remain for For every ves el trading from Flanders, France, without the Straits, liermany, Guernse Holland,

an indetinite period in the floating harbour without any further Jersey, Norway, Poland, and Zealand, per trim

charge. For every sense trading froin Ireland, the Tale of Man, Scotland, or as a coaster, not in tud ng pas

Anchorage and Moorage chargeade only on Veels coming from sel, from Cardift, Newport, and other ports to the

Ports to the westrard of the Holmu. eastward of the Holms, per ton

Anchorage For every vessel from Caruitr, Newport, or any other

port to the eastward of the Holm (not being vessels one third part of the lading of which stali

All conting ryksels, from porta to the westward consist of coal, rroft, iron, tin, lin plates, grain,

of the time, not exceeding 40 tons burther, comer, bricks, stone, coal, tar, alate, bark, uunlar,

Aach Voyage or ww) follows:

Ditto, at and above 40 tons, ditto If such welchall be under 40 tons buruien, for 076

Anchorage Moonsge If such vessel shall be 40 tons burthen, and under

75 fons, for each voyage
If such vesselbe 75 ons burthen, and under :00

All other vessels, not being coasters,
0 16 0
under 3 tons

0 If such lese shall be 100 tons buriben or upwards,

above 50 and under 100 tons for each voyage

50

0

0

7

6

0 0 6

0

9

0 1

eich vorage

0 12

6

cuch.

d.

5 0

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above 100 tons

Ships

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Mayor', Thues payable only by Vessels omrin foron Places west-
nurul in '
Hima, the l'irt w Bittu nad puble restul de

Account of the Number of coasting Vesses and their Tonnage, l'essels of more than Three Times #Win in Space of Twive

distinguishing thone empieged between G. Britain and Ire Calendar Mondhs.

land, from other ('oasters which have entered inwards at royage.

Bristol during the following years, ending 3th January. O tons and under 100 tons, each vessel

5 0

Between 100

10 0 Years. G. Britain and 10

Other Coasters.

Total 15 0

Ireland. 230

30 0 250 and upwards

40 0

Ton.

Ships. Tas Ships. Tons. Quay Warden's Fecs.

1836 Vessels above 60 tons

girti 3,76392,512 5 0 1537 1,279 271) 598

373,177 unter

IS
634

77

334,971 Bant, traw, or barge

IS19 593 Whether from eastward or westward of Holms.

204,861 5,079 29.),633

1940 42) 76,211 1.107 215,499, 1.36293,53 The docks and quays in Bristol are not enllowed. The ware ISA1 323 houses, whether tonded or etherwise, are all private property;

X4,293 : 4,47 229,62 3,350 315,615 1x42 152

231,16 3,114 310,876 they are for the most part close to the quays, and are all easy

1943 403 79,4 of access.

431,943 5,036 131,507

8,975 3,356 2x1,5175,521) 1377,195 The following is an Account of the various Port and other 1815 547

6,229

35,5116,776 4711,79 Charges ahich would be incurred by a show of St. Tuns

116

103,933.131 290,246,112 391,317 bringing a Cargo to Bristol, the Dock Duis being taken at

5,81% 311.0226,354 395,73 the highest Rate.

11

3.117 5,451 34,72 6,25 *4),129 € . d. £. d.

1519

92,2.58 6,263 321,5116,6744211,144.9 Pilotage from Lundy to Kingroad

6 0

180 43% 95,156 6.176 | 33.3,393 6,614 | 128,749 from Kingroad to baxin . -15 0 Assistant pilot 10., yawl 30. .0 13 0

Declared Value of the Esports of British and Irish Proluce 5 men at 38. 9d. each

0 18 9

and Manufactures from, with the Customs Ides at the Port Haven master

0 3 0

of Bristol, during each of the following lears, ending 5th Jan,

9 3 9 Steam-tug from Kingroad to basin, 5d. per ton 10

9 12
Years.
Exports.

Duties.
Anchorage 58., moorage 1d. per ton, 416. 84. 2 6 8
Mayor's dues 408, quay warden's fees, 38.

• 2 5 0

... Deck duela. jer ton

25 0 0

18.56
213,697 11 3

1,177,687 3 7 (From the nearer parts only 6d. per ton)

1837

26.013 19 4 Warner

1,117.912 90 0 10 0

454,67 1 5

1,114,512 40 15.9 334,724 12 10

1,19,074 13 5 59 9

10
417,101 0 0

1,059, 115 00
IS11
32,1010 0

1,07,15 0 0 The charge for labour discharging is from 38. to 38. 6d. per 1812

366.448 6 0

1,016,00 0 0 day, that for cooperage depends co the condition of the carjo.

1813
2,131 17 6

9.255 0 0 'The charge for landing and weighing is id for sugar a.d

IRM, 128 12 0

096.750 0 0 most other kind of goods when the chicrane ar ud.

17,145 0 Ounards. No port charges except lights and pilotage,

1,07,832 00

1,553 19 6 which are the same as innar.de

919,/ 1900 1817 161,59 48

911,314 0 0 Produce of the Dock Dues on Tonnage and Goods at Bristol,

1818
167,41 11 7

1,004,739 0 0 during each of the following Years, ending the 30th of April

1919

117,044 17 10 1,036,733 00

PILOTAR. Years. Tonnage Rates. Rates on Goods. Totals.

To etery lierneed pilot who marigater a ship or messel from Luuly

Island, or wealward thereos, King road.
d.

d.
£

d.
1996
14,478 18 8 7,452 18 6 21.931 17 2

For his pilotage of such vessel, if under 100 tons reg. 197 14,26 16 8 6,879 10 11 21.7015 7 7

burthen

3 3 0 1833 13,32% 10 8 7,917 98 23,216

If I tons and under 200

4 4 0 18.39 11,006 17 8 7,140 2 10 22,717 06

if 200
300)

0 IN10 17,99 7 2 94 2,635 16 6 If 300 tons and upwards

6 0 15.015 19 0

7 9 26,!13 6 9 194% 15,57 18 8 6,242 11 11

From Come to Kingroad.

42,1) 10 7 1843 16,491 17 0

6 2,122 11 6
If such vessel be under 100 tons reg.

2 2 0 1811 17,905 13 9 7,5'14 12 9 25,600 66 If 100) cons and under 200)

2 16 0 1815 1,57 3 2 7.631 16 10 2,181 0 0

If 200
3000)

3 10 0 5 10 %,214

28.036 83

If 300 tons and upwards 1847 19,768 7 0 9,015 15 10

2 10

From Winehead to Kinroad.
IN4S 21.025 6 4
8,61 15 2
If such vessel be under 10) tons reg.

1 1 0 1849 19.145 6 6 9,553 19 * 2,699 5 8 If 16) tons and under 200

1 8 0 If ) 300

. 1 15 0 • The dock dues in the last 6 months of the year ending

If 300 and upwards 30 April 1849 were at the reduced rates.

From the Hulme to Kingroad.
If such veselbe under 10 tons reg.

. 0 0 0 Account of the Number of ships and their Tonnage, distin 1f 10) tons and under 2010 gushing between British and Foreir, which have entered 11 2111)

300

0 17 6 in art. at Bristol, (exclusive of coolers) during each of If 300 and upwards

1 the following years, ending the 5th January.

Every pilot who unicors or carnes a ship or vissel under

100 tons reg., frim ant kif the river A ron, and noor her Years. British.

Total.

in Cumber and or Hathurnt Basin, or who urmoors or curries such a whip or vexel from either of those bisins, and mor her

in, or pilori edi with her down the said river, shall be entitled Shipe. Това. Ships. Tons.

Ships. Tons. to the following pilotge:1836 218 54,70 315 58.981

£ 8. d.
299
36,52
50 9.333 349

65,115
If such vessel be under 40 tons reg

0 4 0 1834 351 71,060 33 5,997 350 76,457

If 40 tons and under 00

0 5 0 14.39 325 63,397

6,034
69.521
1f 60
80

0 7 6 1440 396 79,551 116 12,42 512 92,433

If so
100

0 10 0 1841 129

78 13.779 5116 1814 329 66,259 51 8,1.55 380)

Every pilot who unmoors or carries a ship from Porta! ead, 1913 336 63,227

352 72,120

Kingrail, Hungroad, or Broad Pill, and mort her in Cum. 31.5 25

berlind or Bathurst Basin, and who unmoors or carries i ves. 1815 346 72,532 56 9,352 402

81,714

sel from either of the basins, and mors her in Port head, 1915 360 82.37 14,234 429

Hung'oal, Breast Mill, or Kingroad, or any other of och 1817 331 89,205

7,901 372

97,106

places, or priceeds with her on her voyage, shall be entitled to 96,618 46 7.928 451 101,516 the following pilotage: 18 19 423 108,750 118 15,530

144,310
19.50 450
108,823 16) 22,124 619

131,247
If such vessel be under 100 tons reg.

0 10 0 If 16 tops and under 400

- 0 15 0 Vessels belonging to Bristol, 5 January 18.54), Sailing sesise Is If 200

300

1 0 0 286 of the burden of 37,212 tons, Steain vessels 27, of the bur If 301) anel upwards

1 5 0 den of 3,528 tons.

See further, Art. BRISTOL, P. 1003.

V. Hull Docks, SHIPPING, ETC. There are three considerable docks in Hull; occupying, inclusive of their wharfs, quays, &c., an area of above 28 acres. The first of these docks was constructed in 1775, and the last in 1829. And an act was passed in the session of 1843 for constructing a new dock to the east of the town. The old harbour, in the bed of the river Hull, which passes through the centre of the town, affords considerable accommodation for shipping; it is in contemplation to throw gates across its mouth, which will make it equivalent to another dock. Hull is the next port in the empire, after Bristol, or perhaps

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Foreign.

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Liverpool; for, although the customs duty collected in Hull be inferior to that of Bristol, it having amounted, in 1850, to only 383,5201. gross, she has a much greater amount of foreign trade and of shipping. Indeed the exports from Hull are inferior only to those from Liverpool and London. In 1850 they amounted to 10,366,610!. In 1850, there belonged to the port 258 ships of 50 tons and upwards, having an ag. gregate burden of 55,354 tons, with 195 vessels of less than 50 tons; making a total of 453 ships and 62,472 tons, exclusive of 34 steamers, of the burden of 7,143 tons.

The commerce of Hull depends principally on her advantageous situation. She is the principal emporium of the extensive and fertile counties on the æstuary of the Humber, and of those traversed by the numerous and important rivers, including the Trent, Don, Ouse, &c. that have their embouchure in it. The natural facilities for internal communication thus enjoyed by Hull have been greatly extended by artificial means. She is now united, partly by rivers and partly by canals and railways, with Sheffield, Leeds, Manchester, Liverpool, &c.; 80 that she has become not merely the principal port for the W. Riding of Yorkshire, but also for a considerable portion of the trade carried on between Lancashire and the northern parts of the Continent. The great articles of export are cotton stuffs and twist, woollen goods, iron and hardware, earthenware, &c. The principal articles of import are wool, bones, timber, hemp and lax, corn, and serds, madder, bark, turpentine, skins, &c. The rise of Goole has not been nearly so injurious to the trade of Hull as might have been supposed ; and her superior facilities for trade and navigation will always ensure for her a decided superiority over the other ports on the Humber and its affluents. Hull used to be very largely engaged in the N. whale fishery; but here, as every where else, that branch of industry had dwindled to alınost nothing, only 2 vessels having left the port for the ishery in 1842. But it has again increased, 12 ships having been engaged in it in 1870. A regular intercourse is kept up, by steam packets, between Hull and London, and Hull and several of the Continental ports.

Jettage Anchorage. In thut.

s. d. ... British vessels under 45 tons hurden

10 40 and not 45

10 20

1 50 . 1 6 2 0 16 50 100 - 16

2 6 100 150 - 20

3 6 3 6 150

200 . 2 0
2010
2.50

5 0 5 0
2.50
300

6 0 6 0 300 and upwards •

2 6 6 0 6 6 Freemen are exempt from anchorage, but freemen, as well as non-freemen, pay jetlage. The charge for jettage is not made unless with goods landei at or taken in at Hull, or within the harbour.

British ships pay no hostage, and nothing for ballast.

Hwyage. --- British vessels under 20 tons, %. ; 20 tons and under 30, 28. 6d.; and 6d. additional for every 10 tons. Fue un vessels under 65 tons, 11.; 65 tons and under 1.31. 116; 135 tons and under 170, 178.; 170 tons and under 180, 11.; and 1s. additional for every 10 tons.

Ballast. -- Sand, 13. 4d. per ton; but vessel, by going a mile or two up the river, may get chalk fur rather less, which is more valuable when discharged.

Depth of Water. - The access to the docks are either fron the river Humber, or fron the river Hull. The lock from the Humber in the Humber dock is capable of mone, at springtides, vessels drawing 264 feet; and at neap tales, from 18 to 20 feet. The lock from the old harbour into the olide is always 6 feet short of the water at the other lock: this depths depend much on the state of the winds and other natural

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HARBOUR AND Docx Dues.
Vessels coming to or going between the port of Kingston

upon Hull and any port to the N. of Yarmouth, in Nor-
folk, or an port to the south ward of Holy Island, per ton 0 2
Ve seis coining to or going between the port of Kingston-

upon Hull and any port utween the '., Foreland and

Shetland, on the east side of England, except as ahove 0 3 Vessels trading between the port of King ton-upon-Hull

and any other port in Great Batain not before described 0 6 Ve selstraling between the port of Kingston-upon-Huil and an port in the Baluc Seas, and all other porus

abose the Sound Vessels tradin between the port of Kingston upon-Hull

and any port in Denmark, Sweden, or Norway lelow Elinore, or any port in Germany, ilolland, Flanders, France to the eastward of Ushant, Ireland, the Islands of Guernsey and Jersey

.0 10 Vessels trading between the port of Kingston-upon-Iull

and any island or port of Europe to the westward of Ushani, without the Straits of Gibraltar

1 Vessels trading between the port of Kingston upon-Hull and every post in the W. Indies, N. or . America, Africa, Greenland, or any place to the E. of the North Cape of Norway, all places within the Straits of Gibraltar, and all Islands and places in the ocean to the S. of Cape St. Vincent, not herein-before mentioned - 1 9 Versels corning to or going with merchandise) from any of the above named jorts, pay double the rates, tonnage, or duties, above mentioned, unless the said

vessels belong to British owners, Vessels sailing coast wise or otherwise, and coming into

the said haven in ballast to be laid up (coasting duty included)

. 06 The same rate of charges is made on vessels using the old harbour or roads.

The above rates are re ted in the Dock Company, and are paid at the time of such vessel's entry inwards of clearance or discharge outwards; or, in case any veisel hall not enter as aforesaid, then at any time before such vessel shall proceed from the fort, at the Custom-house, so as no vessel shall be subject or liable to the payment of the rates or duties more than once for the same voyage, both out and home, notwithstanding such vesse may go out and return with a cargo.

Vessels forced into the port by the enemy, or by receiving damage at sea, or otherwise, and shall discharge in order to repair such Jarage, and reload the goods so discharged, are exempted from the above rates and duties, unless they make une if the dock or basin.

Vesels which come and go co netwise from any port in Great Britain, to or from any place up the rivers I rent or Ouse, within the limits of the purt of Hull, to or from any other p! ce up the said ristrs Trent or Oue, or from any other river which falls into the al rivers, or which shall trade between any such port in Great Britain and any kuch place as aforesaid within or up the said rivers, are also exempted from the above hatus and duties, unless they come into or go out of the said

nr dock, of any part of the harbour ailed Hall haven; or that the basis or dock, or Quays within the harbour; or shall unload or put on shore, or loador take on board, any goods, Wre, or merchandise, or any part of the cargo of any vessel, within any part of the river Humber.

N.D.-All ships coming to the port have to pay dock dues whether they make use of the docks or not, Goods inwards pay nu cock dug unless landed upon quays or wharts belonging to the Company. Goods outwarda pay no dock dues.

Duro PAYABLE TO TRE CORPORATION OF HULL

On Vessels indering innards and out marde. Anchorage: -- Alien Fessels under 100 tons hurden, 18. 64.; 100 and under 200 tons, 28.; 200 and upwards, 36.

Jettage - Under 100 tons, 13a. 60.; if loads out more, 3..6d.; 100 and under 200 tons, 178.; if loads out more, 58.; 200 tons and upwarda, 17.; ifind out more, in

Hostage. - Por each rund sterling of the freight inwards, 21.; and among the officers, per shit, 38.

Ballas. - For euch ton taken outwards, 24.

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d. The distance at sen w bere Hawke Roads or Grimsby the North Ness of Dim.

Roads

26 lington bears west Whisebo Roads south-west to the north- The port of Kingstonward of Kiinsea North upon-Hull

5 0
Cliff
The distance at sea where Hawke Roads or Grimsby

Kilnsea North Clit Reads
bears west-north-rest Whitebooth Roads
to the north ward of the The port of Kingston-
New Sand Buoy or the upon-Hull
Floating Light Vessel
at the entrance of the

River Humber.
The wid new Sand Buoy Hawke Roads or Grimsby
or the Floating Light Roads

10 Vessel at the entrance White booth Roads

20 of the River llumbat, The port of Kingston to the eastward of the upon-Hull

3 6 point where the Spur High Lighthouse bears northeast The Spum High Light Hawke Roads or Grimsby house bearing north.

Roads

10 east. Whitebooth Roads

20 The part of Kingstonupon Hull

36 The Hawke Roads, the Whitebooth Roads

bugy of the Purcome The port of Kigston-
Or Grimsby Roads.

upoa-Hull
Whitebooth Roads. The port of Kingston-

upon-Hull

1 RAIRS AND PORT CHARGKA.

Torage. The steam boats are the property of private parties. Towage as may be agreed on,

Oars

Berthage.

d.
Verke drawing 13 feet wat t and upwards

90
Deal ends

per 180 0 6
Vessels drawling 10 feet water and upwards, and not ex.

Balks, middle

30
7

smal -
Vessels drawing under 10 feet water : :
4 0 Ufers, double

1 0
single-

0 6
For detention on board Vesselt performing Quarantine. Cafrasens

0 6
Vessels having British registers, or the owners .. d.

Handspikes

0 4
subjects of the Queen of Great Britain . 5 O per diem. Stares, co to 72 inches

0 4
Vessels belonging to aliens

. 7 0
50 to 60 inches

0 2
Esclusive of the day on which the vessel shall enter into

30 to 30 -

0 1

0 6
Quarantine, and of the day of her release therefrom.

B. itens -

04
For Attendance on board Vessels at anchor in any of the Road Batten ends

0 2
ateads of the Bronber.

Lt, wainscot
For every day of 24 hours' attendance - - 59. per diem. Bians, do
But of a day's attendance, same as for a wbole day.

paling, or outside slabs
Vessels from foreign ports must employ the regular pilots.

clap

06
Vensets outwise are under no restriction, and usually employ

piped -

3 0
one of those class of persons named dusters, whose charge varies

Spars, cant
from 10s. to 126. as may be agreed on.

boom, 4 to 6 inches

2 0

Masts, grest
WATRR BALTT's Due, PAYABLE TO THE CORPORATION OY 8 to 12 inches

each 0 2
Hull, ON CERTAIN Goons IMPORTED AND EXPORTED.

6 to S do.

0 1
Pitch and tar, each (fd. per barrel, or)

per last 06
Hemp, flas, tow, and cordage, each

per ton 08 Turpentine (14. per barrel, or).
Ir in bars
per 60 bars 04 Tobacco

per hhd. 01
Torber: - fir, plank, and oak, each
per load 04 Corn

perqr. 0 6
Deals

per 120 1 0 1 Exetnpt, if the sole property of freemen in British Ships
Account of the Quantities of the principal Articles of Foreign Produce imported into Hull in 1840, 1841,

and 1842.

per load

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Bones -
22,181 tons 14,363 tons 27,866 tons Seed, rape -

6,80? lasts 7,021 lasts 6,373 lasts
Bark, oak

5,145
5,953

clover
2.1 x 2 tons 1,600 tons

1,768 tons
Corn, wlieat

260,567 qrs.
36 2,64 1 qos. 217,740 qr

Spruce beer 165 harrels 1,17% barrels 393 barrels
Baries
1 27.1.34
24,595
7,124 Tar

764 lasts 343 lasts 366 Lasts
Oats

62,00 11,924 44,685 Turpentine 16,474 barrels 20,102 barrels 16,65% barrels
Beans
38,412 27,40
6,543 Tallow

1,95 tons 730 tons 72.5 tons
Pers
37.1
23,689 11,261

(114,551,642.s.

115,779,134lbs. 11,564,97.31bs.
Tares

7,235
6.029 Wool

2, 97 bales, i 2,1 bales
Cake, oil
1.1.90 tons 2,016 tons 7,850 tons

775 bales and 50 bags and 13 lag
Linseed

6,101
7,033
3,023

Russia

466,563 ibs. 591,2017 ds. 403,357 lbs.
Rape

3,612
4,033
2,907

73 bales and ) 20 bales and 9 bales
Flax

450
283 Yarn, raw linen 16 tons

half a ton 20 tons
Dutch and

5,108 lbs. 6 ba
Flemish

2,500 lbs.

383 lbs.
4,433
4,995
2,767

and 3 cases
Baltic

3,472
3,556

Zaffers
277 tons 200 tons

161 tons
Hides -

2,069 cwts. Wood, timber, fir,
Wet

Foreign 12,908 pieces 10,497 pieces 6,989 pieces
Dry

6,319
Colonial
22,2016 11,116

6,707
Os and cow,

Oak

4,013
1,138

788
3.207 cuts.

294
Hardwood 7,154

6,496

3,238
dry
372 cwts. 3,405

8,287 Deals, forrign 505,7 cts. 510,2 cts. 269,5 cts.
Horse, wet

520
1,318
Colonit

492,6
451.9

324,9
dry 5,728

1,630
35 Deal ends, foreign 61,1

65,7

23,3
Hemp -

118 tons

32 tons
36 tons
Colonial

49,1
27.9

26,2
Petersburg 1,516

722

716 - Battens, foreign 227,0 189,1
Riga

1,171
1,0726

Colonial

63,8
91,0

50,3
3,649 tons and 7,233tons and 4,733 tons and Lathwood, foreign 65 8 fath. 697 fath.
Iron bars

661 fath.
261,107 bars 351,229 bars 320,149 bars Colonial

561
383

214
Madders

1,353 tons 1,274 tons 747 tons Masts, foreign 877 No. 209 No. 541 No.
Oil, train

32 tons
33 tuns

51 tuns
Colonial
721

1
Olive
1,561
677
554 Spars, fureign

16,2 cts.
13,0 cts.

92 cts.
Skins -

182 cwts. Colonial

2

1
Kid and Calf,

Staves, foreign 132,8 114,8
4,488 wts. 4,091 cwts. 1,312

Colonial

109,4
61.2

17.3
dry
11,919

2,593
St. John's

27,3)

61
Seed, line

- 201,000 qrs. 126,410 grs. (193,352 qrs. Wainscot logs 1,302 logs 1,100 loges 1,516 logs
Account of the Number of Vessels, with the Amount of their Tonnage, that entered inwards at the Port
of Hull in 1846, specifying the Ports from which they cleared, and the Nations to which they belonged,

69,0

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An Account of the Greenland and Davis's Straits Whale Fishery, carried on from Hull, from 1772 to 1842, both inclusive ; specifying the Number of Ships sent out, the Number lost, the Number that returued clean or without any Cargo, and the Imports of Oil and Bone.

[graphic]

391
19 1808 80

3
265

1809 28
466

23 1810 34
5
68
3 1811 43

1
230

13 1812 49 349

1813

55 171

9

1814 58 232

7 1815 58 311

15 1816 55 261

13 1817 58 270

21 1818 64 269

15 1819 65 379

29 1820 62 604

36 1821 61 945

43 1822 40 1,085

56 1823 1,042

47 1824 36 853

45 1825 36 832

42 1826 32 545

17 1827 30 900

45 1828 30 845

41 1829 33 710

1830

33 1,148

57

1831 32 1,678

77 1832 30 1,741

87 1833 27 2,159

100 1834 27
2,082

110 1835 23
1,718
90

1 beset in
2,156

100 1836 15 ice, return
2,872
140

ed next year
2,183

110

1837 12 4,817

200 1858 6 5,174 250

1839

1810 3,580

170 1841
4,346

200 1842
• Including the ship beset in the ice the previous year.

VI. DUNDEE Docks, SHIPPING, &c. Dundee, on the N. side of the Frith of Tay, lat. 56° 28' N., long. 20 57' 30" W., 9 miles W. from Buttonness Point (on which there are two first-class light-houses, with fixed lights), has increased with extraordinary rapidity since the termination of the late war, and is now become the principal seat of the British linen manufacture, and has a very extensive trade. Down to 1815, the harbour was on a humble scale, and adapted only to a very limited commerce. Only one small pier existed. But in the year referred to, an act was obtained for separating the harbour from the other branches of the burgh revenue, for constructing an entirely new harbour, on a scale commensurate with the growing importance of the place, and for investing the management in a board of commissioners. Additional acts were obtained in 1830 and 1836 ; and the result of the measures thus set on foot has been, that Dundee can already boast of the completion of two wet docks, King William's, of 61, Earl Grey's, of 54, and of a tide harbour, of 4 acres, connected with them. The breadth of the lock of the former, to which is attached a splendid graving dock, is 40 feet; and that of the latter, which is fitted to admit steamers, 55 feet. A crane, reaching 28 feet from the face of the quay wall on which it is placed, and capable of raising 30 tons, is erected at this dock, so that every facility is afforded for taking out and putting in the boilers, &c. of the largest steam vessels. There is also a Morton slip attached to the tide harbour, on which three vessels may be placed at once. The vessels are hauled up by a steamengine of 16 horse power : a ship of 800 tons may be placed on the slip; one of the Dundee steamers, the Perth, weighing, without her boilers, 596 tons, was lately repaired on it.

A wet dock of 14 acres is now being constructed, the lock of which will be 60 feet. The harbour plan also embraces another wet dock of 91 acres, and the tide harbour between these docks will be of the extent of 11 acres. The quays are wide and spacious, affording berthage for above 65 vessels ; and there are extensive and convenient carpenters' and other yards for ship building. The accommodation for the building and repairing of vessels is not surpassed in any port of the kingdom.

These splendid works had cost, in May, 1851, no less than 792,9961. 1s. 6 d., of which 589,245). 195. 6 d. had been expended on the works, and 203,7501. 2s. paid as interest of money borrowed. The amount of shore dues and rents collected up to May, 1851, was 582,821). 168., and the sum borrowed 210,5141. 58. 6d. The sum allowed to be borrowed on the credit of the harbour is 230,0001. The revenue of the harbour from Martinmas, 1764, to 15th of July, 1815, when it was put under a parliamentary commission, was only 38,6961. 38. 4 d., and during this period the sum expended in maintaining it was 9,4681. 10s. 9d. The shore dues in 1765 yielded 126l. ;

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