Saint and Nation: Santiago, Teresa of Avila, and Plural Identities in Early Modern Spain

Portada
Penn State Press, 18 de gen. 2011 - 280 pàgines

In early seventeenth-century Spain, the Castilian parliament voted to elevate the newly beatified Teresa of Avila to co-patron saint of Spain alongside the traditional patron, Santiago. Saint and Nation examines Spanish devotion to the cult of saints and the controversy over national patron sainthood to provide an original account of the diverse ways in which the early modern nation was expressed and experienced by monarch and town, center and periphery. By analyzing the dynamic interplay of local and extra-local, royal authority and nation, tradition and modernity, church and state, and masculine and feminine within the co-patronage debate, Erin Rowe reconstructs the sophisticated balance of plural identities that emerged in Castile during a central period of crisis and change in the Spanish world.

 

Què en diuen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Continguts

Introduction
1
Santiago and the Shadow of Decline
20
Saint Teresa and the Lived Experience of the Holy
48
The Politics of Patron Sainthood
77
The Gender of Foreign Policy
107
Mapping Sacred Geography
135
King Nation and Church in the Habsburg Monarchy
167
Endgame in Rome
193
Epilogue
220
Bibliography
229
Index
255
Back Cover
265
Copyright

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Sobre l'autor (2011)

Erin Kathleen Rowe is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Virginia.

Informació bibliogràfica