Imatges de pàgina
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BxBROISBS IN TRANSLATION AND PARSING. 209

ceiwing,” indeclinable part. of the root lok, with the prep. 1, p. 14b..f Tapahprabhācāt, “ through the efficacy of his devotion” (p. 184. c.), genitively dependent compound, p. 161. ; the first member formed by the crude noun topas, “*devotion," s being changed to Wisargah, by r. 29. and 24. a. ; the second, by the abl. case of prabhāca, noun of the first claSS, maSc. (p. 81.). Tana, See Second Sentence. Mumina, see third Sentence. Māshiko, nom. case, ah changed to o by r. 26. ८. Balishtho, “ very strong," nom. case, masc. of the superlative form of the adj. ८ialim, ** strong ” (See p. 47.), ah changed to o by r. 26. a. Widalah, see fourth sentence. Wis. remains by r. 24. a. Kritah, “ changed,” “ made,” nom. case, Sing. of the pasS. past part. of the root hri, p. 188. b. Wis. remains by r. 24. b. Sixth sentence.-Sa, nom. case of the pronoun tat (p, 51.), used as a definite article, p. 28. r. 46. Wis. dropped, by note f, p. 14. Widalah, See fourth sentence. JKukkurād, “ the dog,'' noun of the first class, masc. (p. 81.), abl. case after a werb of fearing (p. 198. d.), t changed to d by r. 14. Bibheti, “ fears,” 8d sing. pres. tense of the root Ghi, 8d conj. p. 119. Tatah, ** upon that,” adw. p. 152. a. ; as changed to ah, by r. 29. and 24. ८. Kukkurah, “ the dog,” nom. case (p. 81.). Wis. remains by r. 24.d. Kritah, see fifth sentence. Kakkurasya, “ of the dog,'gen. case (p. 8I.). Wyāghrām, “ for the tiger," noun of the first class, masc. (p. 8I.), abl. case, after a noun of **fear ” (p. 184. g.), ८ changed to n by r. 15. Mahad, great,' noun adj. of the fifth claSS, r. 68. nom. case, Sing. neut. ८ changed to d by r. 14. Bhagam, *fear," noun of the first clasS, neut. (p. 82.), nom. case. Tadamamturam, See fourth sentence. Wyāghrah, nom. case. Wis. remains by r. 24. ८. Krita/t, See fifth sentence. Seventh sentence.-Atha, “ now,” inceptive particle, p. 154. b. Wjaghram, acc. case. Api, “ even,” adw. Miashikamiruishesham, “ as not differing at all from the mouse,” compound adverb; the first member formed by the crude noun māshika ; the second by the neut. form of the Substantive oishesha, “ difference,” with mir prefixed, see p. 177. ८. Pashgati, 8d sing. pres. tense of the root drish, Ist conj. p. I07. JMumih, see first Sentence. _ Eighth sentence.-Atah, “ then," adw. p. 152. a. Sarpe, “ all," pronominal adj. nom. case, plur. masc. p. 54. r. 87. “ Tatrasthā, “ residing in the neighbourhood," anomalous compound, in its character resembling a locatively dependent; the first member being formed by the adverb tatra (p. 152. U.), “ there,' or “ in that place''; the second by the nom. plur. masc. of the participial noun of agency of the root sthā, “ t0 remain,' p. 149. 1. Wis. dropped by r. 28. b. Jamas, “ persons,” noun of the first claSS, masc. gend. (p. 81.) nom. case, plur. Wis. changed to s by r. 25. a. Tam, acc. case of the pronoun tat (p. 5I.), used as a definite article. Wyāghram, “ tiger,’’ noun of the first claSS, masc. gend. (p. 81.) acc. case. JDrishttpā, “ having seen,"

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indeclinable past participle of the root drish। (दृश्), p. 148. a. Wadanti, “ they say," {Bd piur. pres. of the root rad, Ist conj. Ninth sentonce.–Anema, **by this,” instr. case of the demonstrative pronoun ayam, p. 52. Mumina, see third sentence. Miishiko, nom. case, ah changed to o by r. 26. b. Ajam, “ this," nom. case of the demonstrative pron., p. 52. The initial a cut off by r. 26. D. Wyājhrataim, “ the condition of a tiger,” fem. abstract noun of the first class (p. 81.), acc. case, formed from the substantive tyāghra, “ a tiger,' by the affix ta, p. 24. xiv. Vita/), *brought.” nom. case, Sing. masc. of the pass-part. of the root mi, p. 188. b. Temth sentence.-Etach, “ this,' acc. case, neut. of the demonstrative pron- efot, p. 52. r. 79., t being changed to ch by r. l7. Chhrutupa, “ overhearing,” indeclinable participle of the root shru (श्रु) p. I48. a. श्रुत्वा becomes चुत्वा by r. l7. Wyāghrah, nom. oase. Wis. remains by r. 24. ८. Satyatho, ** uneasy,' relative compound, formed by prefixing the preposition saha to the fem. substantive tyathā, p. I69. r. 161. See also p. 82. *, ah changed to o by r. 26. b. Achintayat, “ reflected,T 8d sing. Ist pret. of the root chint, 10th conj. p. 87. e ; the initial a cut off by r. 26. b. Eleventh Sentence.-Hindd, **as long as," adw. p. 151. a., t changed to d by r. 14. Anema, See ninth sentence. Japitatyam, “ to be lived," nom. case, neut. of the fut. paSS. part. of the root.jit', p. 146. a. See also r. 215. c. d. Tapat, “ so long," adv. correlative to g/ācat, p. I5]. n. Idam, ** this,' nom. case, neut. of the demonstrative pron. dyam, p. 52. Mama, “ of me,'' gen. case of the pronoun aham, * I,' p. 50. Stoarāpāk//timam, **story ofmy original condition,” genitively dependent compound, p. 10I. ; the first member formed by the crude noun suariipa, **natural form” (cf r. 89.) ; the second by the nom. case of akhyāma, noun of the first class, neuter, m retained by r. 28. Akirtikaram, “ disgraceful,” accusatively dependent compound ; the first member formed by the crude noun akārti, “ disgrace"; the second by the nom. case, neut. of the participial noun of agency kara, p. 140, 1. Va, “ not,” adv. p. 158. ८. Pali/islijjate, “ will die away,'' 8d sing. 2d fut. ātm. of the compound werb palāg/, formed by combining the root i with the prep.para, p. 174. Twelfth Sentence.-Iti, “ thus,” adv. p. 158. e. See also r. 219. a. Samalochya, “ reflecting," indeclinable part. of the compound verb 8amaloch (p. 145..f), formed by combining the root locl) with the prepositions sam and a, pp. 174. I75. Munim, acc. case. Hantum, “ to kill,” infinitive mood of the root ham, pp. 85. and II5. and r. 200. Samudyata/, “ prepared,” nom. case, sing. masc. of the pass. Past part. of the compound verb samudyam (p. 140. 0.), formed by combining the root /dm with the prepositions sam and at.

Thirfeenth sentence.-Munis, nom. case. Wis. changod to s by r. 25. a. Tosya,

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There lives in Oujein,* a Brahman, named Mādhava. His wife bore him (a son). She having stationed the Brahman (her husband) to take charge of the young child, went to perform ablution. Meanwhile a message came from the king for the Brahman to perform the Parvana Shrāddha." On hearing which the Brahman, from his natural neediness, thought to himself, “ if I do not go guickly some other Brahman will take the Shrāddha. But there is none here (that I may leave) as a guardian to the child,-what then can I do ? Come, having stationed this long-cherished weasel, dear to me as a son, in charge of the infant, I will go.” Having so done, he went. Presently a black serpent Silently approaching the child was killed by the weasel and torn in pieces. By and by the weasel seeing the Brahman returning, guickly running to meet him, his mouth and feet Smeared with blood, Irolled himself at the Brahman's feet. Then that Brahman seeing him in such a condition, hastily concluding that he had eaten the child, killed him. Afterwards no sooner did he come up than he beheld the infant slumbering safely and the black serpent lying dead. Then looking at his benefactor the weasel, and bitterly repenting (of his precipitation), he experienced exceeding grief.

* The oldest city in India.

f The Shrāddha is a funeral ceremony, consisting of oblations of water and fire to the gods and manes, and gifts to the officiating Brahmans, performed at various fixed periods, in behalf of a deceased parent or ancestor, to secure the happy condition of his soul. The Parvana is a particular form of Shrāddha, in behalf of three ancest0rS.

SELEOTIONS

IN PR,0SE AND WER.SE.

OBSERWE, that the greater number of the words in the following Selections will be found in the Wocabulary to Professor Johnson's edition of the Hitopadesha. And whenever a word does not occur in that Wocabulary, it is given at the foot of the page. The words of the text have been printed Separately from each other, as it is imagined that the permutation of final and initial letters is of itself a difficulty, unknown in other languages, Sufficient to retard the progress of the beginner in his first effort at translation. It seems, therefore, wholly unreasonable and unnecessary to increase this difficulty by an useless conformity to the practice of the natives, in joining together all the words in a sentence, until the student has attained a certain degree of proficiency. When, however, a final and initial wowel blend into one Sound, and when Crude nouns are associated to form compounds, Separation is impossible, and in Such cases a dot placed underneath Imarks the division. The substance of the following Simple story of the Brahman Wedagarbha and his pupils, is taken from a little book, printed in Calcutta, called the Sanskritamālā.

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