Imatges de pÓgina
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Enter OLD MIRABEL, DUGARD, and BISARRE, L.

0. Mir. (L.c.) Robin, Robin, where's Bob? where's my boy?-What, is this the lady? a pretty vixen, faith! Harkye, child, because my son was so civil as to oblige you with a coach, I'll treat you with a cart, indeed I will.

Dug. (c.) Ay, madam, and you shall have a swinging equipage, three or four thousand footmen at your heels, at least.

Dur. No less becomes her quality.

Bis. (L. c.) Faugh! the monster!

Dur. Monster! ay, you're all a little monstrous, let me tell you.

Re-enter MIRABEL, L.

O. Mir. Ah, my dear Bob, art thou safe, man? Mir. No, no, sir, I'm ruined! the saver of my life is lost!

O. Mir. No, he came and brought us the news.
Mir. (L. c.) But where is he?

Re-enter ORIANA, L.

Ha! [Runs and embraces her.] My dear preserver, what shall I do to recompense your trust? Father, friends, gentlemen, behold the youth that has relieved me from the most ignominious death. Command me, child; before you all, before my late so kind indulgent stars, I swear to grant whate'er you ask.

Ori. To the same stars, indulgent now to me, I will appeal as to the justice of my claim; I shall demand but what was mine before the just performance of your contract to Oriana. [Discovers herself.

Omnes. Oriana!

Ori. (L. c.) In this disguise I resolved to follow you abroad, counterfeited the letter that got me into your service; and so, by this strange turn of fate, I became the instrument of your preservation.

Dur. (R. C.) Mirabel, you're caught.

Mir. Caught! I scorn the thought of imposition! Caught! No, 'tis my voluntary act; this was no human stratagem; but by my providential stars, designed to shew the dangers wandering youth incurs by the pursuit of an unlawful love, to plunge me headlong in the snares of vice, and then to free me by the hands of virtue :

here on my knees I humbly beg my fair preserver's pardon; my thanks are needless, for myself I owe. And now for ever do protest me yours.

O. Mir. Tall, all, di, dall. [Sings.] Kiss me, daughter-you shall kiss me first, [To ORIANA] for you're the cause on't. Well, Bisarre, what say you to the captain?

Bis. I like the beast well enough; but I don't understand his paces so well as to venture him in a strange road.

0. Mir. But marriage is so beaten a path that you can't go wrong.

Bis. Ay, 'tis so beaten, that the way is spoiled.

Dur. There is but one thing should make me thy husband-I could marry thee to-day for the privilege of beating thee to-morrow.

O, Mir. Come, come, you may agree for all this. Mr. Dugard, are not you pleased with this?

Dug. So pleased, that if I thought it might secure your son's affection to my sister, I would double her fortune.

Mir. Fortune! has she not given me mine? my life, my estate, my all, and, what is more, her virtuous self. Behold the foil [Pointing to LAMORCE] that sets this brightness off! [To ORIANA] Here, view the pride [To ORIANA] and scandal of the sex. [TO LAMORCE. What liberty can be so tempting there, [TO LAM. As a soft, virtuous, am'rous, bondage here?

[TO ORIANA.

THE END.

LOVE IN A VILLAGE.

ACT I.

SCENE I.—A Garden, with Statues, Fountains, and Flower-pots, R. and L.

ROSETTA and LUCINDA are discovered at work, seated upon two garden-chairs, c.

DUET.

Ros. Hope! thou nurse of young desire,
Fairy promiser of joy,

Painted vapour, glow-worm fire,
Temp'rate sweet, that ne'er can cloy.

Luc. Hope! thou earnest of delight,
Softest soother of the mind,
Balmy cordial, prospect bright,
Surest friend the wretched find.

Both. Kind deceiver, flatter still,

Deal out pleasures unpossest;
With thy dreams my fancy fill,
And in wishes make me blest.

Luc. (R. c.) Heigho!-Rosetta!
Ros. (c.) Well, child, what do you say?

[Both rise.

Luc. "Tis a sad thing to live in a village a hundred miles from the capital, with a preposterous gouty father, and a superannuated maiden aunt. I am heartily sick of my situation.

Ros. And with reason. But 'tis in a great measure your own fault: here is this Mr. Eustace, a man of character and family; he likes you, you like him; you know one another's minds, and yet you will not resolve to make yourself happy with him.

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Justice Woodcock. Why, you silly girl, I won't do you any harm.

Act 11. Scene 2.

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