Imatges de pÓgina
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Cran. Let me speak, sir;

For Heaven now bids me; and the words I utter
Let none think flattery, for they'll find them truth.
This royal infant, (Heaven still move about her!)
Though in her cradle, yet now promises

Upon this land, a thousand, thousand blessings,
Which time shall bring to ripeness: She shall be
A pattern to all princes living with her,

And all that shall succeed.

Truth shall nurse her,

Holy and heavenly thoughts still counsel her:

She shall be loved and fear'd: Her own shall bless her; Her foes shake like a field of beaten corn,

And hang their heads with sorrow;

Our children's children

Shall see this, and bless Heaven.

King. Thou speakest wonders.

Cran. She shall be, to the happiness of England,
An aged princess; many days shall see her,
And yet no day without a deed to crown it.
'Would I had known no more! but she must die,
She must, the saints must have her; yet a virgin,
A most unspotted lily, shall she pass

To the ground, and all the world shall mourn her.
King. O, lord archbishop,

This oracle of comfort has so pleased me,

That, when I am in heaven, I shall desire

To see what this child does.-I thank you all.—
Lead the way, my lords;

Ye must all see the queen, and she must thank you,
She will be sick else. This day, no man think
He has business at his house; for all shall stay;
This little one shall make it holiday.

[Flourish of Trumpets and Drums.-Exeun.

THE END.

T. DOLBY, Printer, 17, Catherine Street, Strand, London.

There was a Brutus once, that would have brook
The eternal devil to keep his state in Rome,
As casily as a king.

Bru. That you do love me, I am nothing jealous;
What you would work me to, I have some aim :
How I have thought of this, and of these times,
I shall recount hereafter; for this present,
I would not-so with love I might entreat you-
Be any further moved. What you have said,
I will consider; what you have to say,

I will with patience hear; and find a time
Both meat to hear and answer such high things.
Three Shouts, L.
The games are done, and Cæsar is returning.

Cas. (R. C.) As they pass by, pluck Casca by the sleeve;

And he will, after his sour fashion, tell you

What hath proceeded, worthy note, to-day.

Bru. (L.) I will do so :-But, look you, Cassius,
The angry spot doth glow on Cæsar's brow,
And all the rest look like a chidden train.
Cas. Casca will tell us what the matter is.

Both Cross to R.-Music.

Enter Standards of S. P. Q. R.-Lictors-Lepidus, ANTONY, CESAR-Standards, a Star-Golden EaglesSilver Eagles-Guards-Senators-TREBONIUS, CASCACINNA, POPILIUS-DECIUS and METELLUS, r. u. e.

Cæs. (c.) Antonius-
Ant. (c.) Cæsar.

Cæs. Let me have men about me that are fat;
Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep o' nights :
Yond' Cassius has a lean and hungry look:
He thinks too much, such men are dangerous.
Ant. Fear him not, Cæsar; he's not dangerous
He is a noble Roman, and well given.

Cas. 'Would he were fatter:-But I fear him not:
Yet, if my name was liable to fear,

I do not know the man I should avoid

So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much;
He is a great observer, and he looks

;

Quite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays,
As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music
Seldom he smiles; and smiles in such a sort,
As if he mock'd himself, and scorn'd his spirit

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Brutus. With this I depart-that, as I slew my best lover for the good of Rome, I have the same dagger for myself, when it shall please my country to need my death.

Act III. Scene 4.

JULIUS CÆSAR:

A TRAGEDY,

En Five Acts,

BY WILLIAM SHAKSPEARE.

PRINTED FROM THE ACTING COPY, WITH REMARKS,
BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL, BY D-G.

To which are added,

A DESCRIPTION OF THE COSTUME,-CAST OF THE CHARACTERS, ENTRANCES AND EXITS,-RELATIVE POSITIONS OF THE PERFORMERS ON THE STAGE, AND THE WHOLE OF THE STAGE BUSINESS.

As now performed at the

THEATRES ROYAL, LONDON.

EMBELLISHED WITH A FINE ENGRAVING,

By MR. WHITE, from a Drawing taken in the Theatre, by
MR. R. CRUIKSHANK.

LONDON:

JOHN CUMBERLAND, 6, BRECKNOCK PLACE,

CAMDEN TOWN.

However he puts on this tardy form.

This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,

Which gives men stomach to digest his words
With better appetite.

Bru. And so it is. For this time I will leave you. To-morrow, if you please to speak with me,

I will come home to you; or, if you will,

Come home to me, and I will wait for you.
Cas. (c.) I will do so.

Bru. (R. C.) Till then, my nobld friend, chew upon this ; Brutus had rather be a villager,

Than to repute himself a son of Rome

Under these hard conditions as this time

Is like to lay upon us.-Fare you well.

[Exit, R.

Cas. (c.) Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see,

Thy honourable metal may be wrought
From that it is disposed: Therefore 'tis meet
That noble minds keep ever with their likes:
For who so firm, that cannot be seduced?

Cæsar doth bear me hard: But he loves Brutus :
If I were Brutus now, and he were Cassius,
He should not humour me.-I will this night,
In several hands, in at his windows throw,
they came from several citizens,

As

Writings all tending to the great opinion
That Rome holds of his name; wherein obscurely
Cæsar's ambition shall be glanced at:

And, after this, let Cæsar seat him sure;
For we will shake him, or worse days endure.

[Exit, R.

ACT II.

SCENE I.-Rome.-A Street.-Thunder and Lightning.

Enter CASSIUS, R. meeting CASCA, L.

Cas. (R.) Who's there?

Casca. (L.) A Roman.

Cas. (c.) Casca, by your voice.

Casca. (c.) Cassius, what night is this?

Cas. A very pleasing night to honest men.

Casca. Who ever knew the heavens menace so?

Cus. Those that have known the earth so full of faults.

Now, could I, Casca, name to thee a man

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