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New Univerfal Etymological

ENGLISH DICTIONARY:

CONTAINING

An Additional Collection of Words (not in the first Volume) with thei: Explications and Etymologies from the Ancient Britif, Teutonick, Dutch, Saxon, Danish, French, Italian, Spark, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Chaldee, &c. each in its proper Character.

ALSO

Ar Explication of Hard and Technical Words, or Terms, in all ARTS and SCIENCES; with ACCENTS directing to their proper Pronunciation, fhewing both the Orthography and Orthoepia of the Englip Tongue.

ILLUSTRATED

With fome Hundred Curs, giving a clearer Idea of thofe Figures, not fo well apprehended by verbal Defcription.

LIKEWISE

Collection and Explanation of WORDS and PHRASES used in our a cient Charters, Statutes, Writs, Old Records and Procefles at Law.

ALSO.

The Theogony, Theology, and Mythology of the Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, c. being an Account of their Deities, Solemnities, Divinations, Augories, Oracles, and Hieroglyphicks.

A WORK useful for fuch as wild UNDERSTAND what they RED and HEAR, SPEAK what they MEAN, and WRITE tru ENGLISH.

To which is added,

A DICTIONARY of CANT WORDS.

VOL.

II.

The

By N.
N. BAILEY.

FOURTH EDITION,

Cone Ped, and much improved throughout, by the Addition of Great Viety of Examples, explaining the true Significations of the Words, taken from the best Authors.

LONDON:

Printed for T. WALLER, oppofite Fetter-Lane, Fleet-Street.

MDCCLVI.

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THE

PREFACE.

T

HE English Tongue, the prefent Speech of Great Britain, and the Subject Matter of this Dictionary, is a Compound of ancient Languages, as British, (Welsh) Saxon, Danish, Norman and modern French, Latin and Greek. From the five firft of which, the Bulk or converfable Part is derived, and from the two laft, the Technical Words or Terms of Art and Science. The British Tongue, though originally the native Language of the Country, makes, however, but the fmallest Part of the Compofition. For the Britains, having been gradually weakened by their Wars with the Picts, Romans, Saxons, Danes, &c. for the Space of one thousand Years, were at last obliged to retire over the British Alps, carrying with them their Language into that Part of Britain call'd Wales, where they have preferved it to this Day. Mean while their victorious Oppreffors have outed the proper Owners of their Country, and not only occupied their Lands, but induftriously diffeminated their own Languages.

THE Roman Legions, though they refided fome hundreds of Years in Britain, made no extraordinary Alteration in the British Tongue, fo tenacious were the Britains of their native Language at that Time.

NOR did the Danes make much more, by Reason of the Shortness of their Reign, which was but about twenty feven Years, except in fome of the Northern Counties, where they made their firft Settlements, about 200 Years before they arrived at the fupreme Power. To this may be added, the Averfion that their Barbarity to the Britains had wrought in them, to their Government, Perfons and Speech.

THE Saxons, by a longer Poffeffion, did more fupprefs the British Tongue, then mixed with fome Latin and Danish, and cultivated their own Tongue univerfally throughout the Kingdom.

To them fucceeded the Normans, who induftriously laboured to eradicate the Saxon Language, and establish the French in its Stead;

and

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