Imatges de pàgina
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DIA CLASIS (of danhaw, Gr. to break off) a fracture.

DIACONICON (of diánov, Gr.) the facrifty, the place in or near ancient churches, where the veftments and church-plate were repofited.

DIACO'PE (diacopus, L. of dianor, Gr.) a cutting or dividing asunder.

DIACOPE (with Surgeons) a deep wound, especially one made in the fcull with a large

instrument.

DIACOPE (with Rhetoricians) the fame as Diafole.

DIACORAL'LION, a medicine made chiefly of Coral.

L.

DIACO'RUM, a medicine made of acorns,

DIACOSTUM, a medicine made of Coftus, L.

DIA'CRISIS (diáxplorie, Gr.) a separating, fevering or dividing.

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DIAG'ONAL

(with
DIAGONAL Line We

metricians) a line drawn acrofs
any figure from angle to angle;
fometimes called the diameter
diagonal; and fometimes it fig.
nifies a particular parallelogram,
or 'ong fquare, that has one com-
mon angle and diagonal line, with the prin
cipal parallelogram..

DIAGONAL Scale, and the Plain Scak, ferve to reprefent any numbers and measures whatever, the parts of which are equal to one another; thus gunners make ufe of a fcale, or take the dimenfion of a piece of ord giμ-nance. Engravers have a scale orrule to make a draught of a fortification on paper, e.

DIACRO'CUMA, a medicine made chiefly of faffion, L.

DIACROM MYON (of dia and μ, Gr.) a medicine made of onions, DIACU'MINUM, a compofition made of cummin, L.

DIACYDONITES (of die Tv nudaviwv, Gr.) fuch medicines in which quinces are an ingredient.

DIACYDO'NIUM (dia râv nudaníaw, Gr.) a confection made of the pulp of quinces and fugar, commonly called marmalade, L. DIADAMASCE'NUM, a compofition of damafcens, L.

DIADE'MATED (diadematus, L.) wearing a diadem, crown or furbant.

DIA DOCHUS (diadox☺, Gr.) a precious ftone like a beril.

DIÆ RESIS (in Printing) is a vowel mark'd with two tittles or points, as enë, ï or ü, to fignify, that is is founded by itfeif, and not joined to another fo as to make a dipthong; as aera by the points over the e is diftinguished

from æra.

DIÆ'RESIS (with Anatomists) is a confuming or eating out the vessels, so that fome certain paffages are made by fome sharp fretting matter, which naturally should not have been; alfo when fome real ones are widened more than ordinary, fo that the humours run out which ought to be contained in the vessels.

DIETA (zira of dialabai, Gr. to make ufe of a certain order of food) diet, food, a particular way or manner of life, L.

DIAGAL ANGA, a medicine made of galangal.

DIAGLAUCION (dayλavuíwr, Gr.) a medicine for the eyes made of the herb Glaucium, L.

DIACLYPHICE (#yhup, Gr.) the

DIAGRAM (in Geometry, a fcheme or fi gure made with lines or circles, for the laying down an explanation or demonstration of any propofition or figure, or properties belonging thereto.

DIAGRAPH'ICE (Siaypapian, Gr.) art of painting or carving on box, L.

the

DIAGRY DIUM Scanmony, or the plant or root of fcammony prepared by boiling it a hollowed quince,or with the juice of a quince, or lemon, or pale rofes.

DIAHYS'SOPUM, a medicine made up of hyffop.

DIAIRIS, a medicine made of the plant Iris. L.

DIAL PLANES, are plain boards, plates or furfaces on, which hour-lines are drawn for any latitude, and are diftinguished according to the refpect they bear to the horizon of the place where they are made, and are, according to their position or fituation, parallel, per pendicular or oblique.

Primary DIALS, are either horizontal dia's

or vertical dials.

Moon DIALS, fuch as thew the hour of the night, by the means of the light or fhadow of the moon proje ted thereon by an index.

Mural DIALS, fuch as are placed again?

walls.

Equinoctial DIAL, is one defcribed on the equinoctial plane, or a plane parallel to the

horizon.

Vertical DIAL, is one drawn on the plant of a vertical circle.

Polar DIAL, is one defcribed on a plane paffing through the poles of the world and the

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taft and weft points of the horizon. DILEMMA (with Physicians; a space between two fevers. L.

DI'ALLING (with Miners) is the ufing a compafs and long line to know which way the load or vein of oar inclines, or where to fink an air-fhaft.

DIALLING Line 2 graduated lines DIALLING Scales placed on rulers, & to expedite the making of fun-dials. DIALACICA, a medicine made of Lacca er Gum-lac.

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DIAPALMA, a kind of falve. L. DIAPAPA'VER, a medicine made of poppies. L.

DIALTHE'A (diaλdaía, Gr.) anunguent, the chief ingredient of which is Alibaa. DIALYSIS (á, Gr.) a figure in Rhetorick, when two points are placed by Grammarians over two vowels in one word, which would otherwife make a diphthong; but are by this character (...) pointed into two. DIAMETER of a Column (in Architec-ing of the blood veffels; a fweating or bursting

DIAPAS'MA (διαπάσμα, οι διαπάσσων Gr.) a compofition of powders, with which the ancients us'd to dry their bodies from fweat at their coming out of the baths.

aure is that taken just above the bases. DIAMETER of the favelling (in Architelure) is that taken at the height of one third from the base.

DIAPE'DIASIS (with Anatom.) a break

out of the blood thro' the veins, which is

caufed by their thinness.

DIAPEN'TE (diámevre, i. e. of five, Gr.) a phyfical compofition made up of five inDIAMETER of the Diminution (Arcbi-gredients, viz. myrth, gentian, birth-wort, tecture) is that taken from the top of the havings of ivory and bay berries; alfo the liquor calied punch.

fhafts.

DIAMETRICALLY (diametriquement, F, of Bauerpos, Gr.) directly.

DIAMOND (adamas, L. of asapaç, Gr. diamant, F) the hardest, moft fparkling, and most valuable of all precious ftones. The goodness of a diamond confists in three things. 1. Its laftre or water. 2. Its weight or bignefs. 3. Its hardness. The Great Mogul of India has a diamond that weighs 269 3-4ths carats, valued at 11 millions, 723 thoufand, 278 pounds, 14 fhillings and 9 pence. Facet DIAMOND, is one cut in faces both at top and bottom, and whofe table or principal place at the top is flat.

Rofe DIAMOND, is one that is quite flat underneath; but whofe upper part is cut in divers little faces, ufually triangles, the upper part of which terminates in a point.

A rough DIAMOND, is one just as it comes out of the mines that has not yet been

cut.

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DIAPENTE (in Mufick) the fecond of the concords; the terms of which are as three to two, otherwife called a perfect fifth, and makes up an octave with the Diatesjaron.

DIAPHANEITY Z (diaphaneté, F. DIAPHA'NOUSNESS of diaparila, Gr.) the property of a diaphanous body, i. e. one that is transparent like glass; the hu mours of the eye; the Tunica Cornea, &c. The pores of diaphanous bodies, are fo ranged and difpofed, that the beams of light can pafs thro' them freely every way.

DIAPHOENICON, an electuary whose chief ingredient is dates, I..

DIAPHONICKS (of diapoio, Gr.) a fcience that explains the properties of refracted founds, as they pals through different

mediums,

DIAPHONIA (with Rhetor.) a figure when a word repeated is ufed in a fignification different from what it was at first.

DIAPHORETICK (dapoparing, Gr.) dicuffive, that difolves by fweat, &c.

DIAPHORETICALNESS, a property

DIAPHRAGM' (diaphragma, L. of diaayua, of dagarro, to inclofe, Gr.) a fence or hedge fet between.

Temple DIAMONDS (fo called of the Tem-to cause sweat. ple in Paris in France, where they are made) are a fort of factitious diamonds, of no great value, but us'd much in the habits of the actors орол the stage. DIAMO'RON, a confection made of mul

ries.

Simple DIAMO'RUM (of d and morum,

DIAPHRAGMATICK Artery (Anat.) one that iffues from the trunk of the Aorta, and goes from thence to the Diaphragma.

DIAPOMPHOLYGOS (0) Siά and móje

La mulberry) a medicinal compofition made, Gr. the recrement of brafs) an unguent of mulberry juice and fugar.

Compound DIAMORUM (in Pharmacy) is made of mulberry juice, fapa, verjuice, myrrh and faffron.

DIAMOS CHUM, a medicinal powder

of which that is an ingredient.

. DIAPRU'NUM, an eleftuary made of damask prunes, &c.

DIAPYE TICKS, medicines promoting the fuppuration of (wellings, and causing them

to run with matter, or ripening or breaking ¡ a magistrate elected in the great emergencia fores, &c.

DIAPHTHORA (diaplofa, Gr.) corruption of any part.

DIARRHO'DON (in Pharmacy) a name given to feveral compofitions wherein red rofes are an ingredient.

DIASATYRION, an electuary where

of the ftate, whofe office held fix months, and no longer, during which time he acted like an abfolute monarch, fo that from his fentence there lay no appeal, not even in cafes of life and death.

Application was never made to this magi ftrate but in cafes that were difficult and dan

of the chief ingredient is Satyrion or Rag-gerous, when affairs could not well be ma

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naged the ufual way.

There were 24 axes borne before the dic tator, whereas a conful had but 12. DICTATORSHIP (dictatura, L.) the office and dignity of a dictator.

DICTATORY (diatorius, L.) pertaining to a dictator, or dictating.

DICTATRIX, a fhe-dictator or inditer, &'c. L.

DICTYOI'DES (of dixtuos, a net, and fhape, Gr.) à mufcle, &c. in form

refembling a net.

DIASTEM' (in Antient Mufick) a name given to a fimple interval, in contradiction to a compound interval which they call a System. DIASTOLE (with Rhet.) a figure, when, between two words fome other word, and fometimes two words, are put between two words of the kind; as Dii mea vota, Dii audire Lyce, Horace, Duc age, duc ad nos, &c. This figure is by the Latins called Separatio.

DIASTREM'MA (of diaggipw, Gr.) to turn afide) a distortion or laxation.

DIATA'SIS (of darsiva, Gr. to ftretch out) a diffenfion of any fort, particularly of a limb in cafe of a fracture.

DIATERETICA (diargnois, Gr.) the art of preferving health.

DIATE RESIS (of Siargneis, Gr.) a good conftitution of the bones, when they are apt to move eafily and ftrongly, fuch as the arms, hands, &c.

DIATHA MERON, a compound of dates. DIATONICK (of did and tov, Gr.) as diatonick, mufick, which fee.

DIATUR BITH, an electuary of Turbith. DIAXYL'ALOES, a medicine made of the wood of aloes, L.

DICA 'CIOUSNESS (dicacitas, L.) talk. ativeness; alfo buffoonery, drollery.

DICHOR/E'US (diyópe, Gr. i. e. compounded of two choreus's) a foot in verfe, either Greek or Latin, which confifts of four fyllables, of which the firft and third are long, and the fecond and fourth fhort, as Comprobare,

DICHOTOMIST (διχοτομία, Gr.) one who divides a thing into two parts.

DIDACTICALLY (of didactique, F.didatiicus, L, of didantines of didasan, Gr. to teach) inftructively.

DIDYMOI TO 'ΚΙΑ (διδυμοιτοκία οι ειδο pos, twins, and Toxiw, Gr. to bring forth) bearing twins.

DE DIE IN DIEM, from day to day, L. DIE'RESIS (diaignois of diaga, Gr.) the making two fyllables into one.

DIERESIS (with Surgeons) a feparation of parts which are unnaturally joined together,

and are an hindrance to a cure.

DIERESIS (with Anatomifis, &c.) a co fumption of the canals or veffels of an animal body, either by having fome paffages made that should not have been, or by the dilation of the natural paffages beyond their natural ftate, by which the juices which fhould be contained in them extravafe or run over. DIES, a day. L

DIETETICK, pertaining to a regular cr prefcribed diet.

DIETICAL (of diæta, L. daira, Gr.) appertaining to a prefcribed food, or a me thod of eating and drinking.

DIF/FERENCE (with Logicians) is an ef fential attribute, which belongs to any pe which is not found in the Genus, and is the univerfal idea of that fpecies. As for ex ample, body and spirit or foul in human. ture, are two fpecies of fubftance, which is their ideas do contain fomething more than in that substance; for in a body is found im penetrability and extenfion, in a foul er fu DICOTYLEDON (with Botanifis) a term the power of cogitation, of thinking and rea ufed of plants, which fpring with two feed-foning; and thence the difference of a but leaves oppofite each other, as the generality is impenetrable extenfion, and the different: of plants have. of a fpirit is cogitation.

DICÆOLOGY (dinziologbe, Gr.) a pleading one's caufe, and advocating for.

DICTATION, a pronouncing or dictating of any thing to another man to be written by him.

DIFFERENTIAL of any quantity, is th

fluxion of that quantity.

DIFFERENTIAL Quantity (in the big

DICTATOR, a person who directs ano-Geometry) an infinitely fmall quantity, or par

ther what to write,

DICTATOR (with the antient Romans)

ticle of a quantity, fo fmall as to be inces mepluribe

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menfurable thereto, or less than an affignable

one.

DIFFERENTIAL calculus (Geog.) a method of differencing quantities, that is, of finding a differential, or that infinitely small quantity, which taken an infinite number of times is equal to a given quantity.

DIFFERENTAL (in the doctrine of Logarithms) the doctrine of tangents.

DIFFÉREN'TIO-DIFFERENTIAL calculus, is a method of differencing differential quantities, as the fign of a differential is the letter d, that of a differential of d x, is d d x, and the differential of d d x, d d d x or d 2 %, d3x, &c.

A DIFFERENTIAL (of the first power or degree) is that of an ordinary quantity, as

dx.

DIGESTIVES (in Phyficks) are fuch medicines as caufe digestion, by strengthening and increafing the tone of the ftomach.

DIGITATED (in Botany) a term apply'd to the leaves of plants which are either compofed of many fimple leaves, fet together upon one foot-talk, as in the Cinque-foil, Vetches, &c. or elfe, when there are many deep gafhes or cuts in the leaf, as in thofe of Strawberries, Hops, &c.

To DIGITIZE, to point with the finger. DIGITS (in Arithmetick)) are any whole number under ten, as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, are called digits, L.

DIGLYPH (Architecture) a kind of im perfect triglyph, confole or the like, with only two channels or engravings.

DIGNIFIEDNESS (of dignus, worthy, and

A DIFFERENTIAL (of the second pow-fio, L. to make) dignity. er) is an infinitefimal or a differential quantity of the first degree, as d d x or d x d x, or *2, &c.

DILA'TABLENESS, capableness of being

A DIFFERENTIAL (of the third power, &c.) is an infinitefimal or a differential quantity of the fecond power, as d d d x, or d x 3, &c.

DIFFERENTNESS (of differentia, L.)

difference,

DIFFICULTNESS (difficulté, F. of diffi. ultas, L.) hardnefs to be performed, trouble, a difficult cafe, point or question. To DIFFIDE (diffidere, L.) to miftruft, to doubt, to despair. DIFFIDENTNESS (of diffidentia, L.) diftruft, fufpiciousness.

To DIFFIND' (diffindere, L.) to cut or cleave afunder.

widened.

DILATATION (in Phyficks) a motion in the parts of a body whereby it expands itfel: to a greater bulk than ufual. fome confounded with rarefaction, which is This is by erroneous in this, that rarefaction is an expanfion of a body caused by heat; wherea. dilatation is effected by its own elasticit when it has been compreffed by a greater bulk than ufual.

DILATATORIUM (with Surgeons) an inftrument to open any part, as the mouth,

womb or fundament.

L. DILIGENTNESS (diligentia, L.) great care, carefulness.

DILUEN'TIA (with Phyficians) medicines, c. good to dilute and thin the blood. L. DILUTE (in Batanick Writers) faintly;

flow-dilutius, more faintly. L.

DIFFIS'SION, a cleaving asunder. DIFFLUENCY (diffluentia, L.) a ing abroad, or divers ways. DIFFLUENT (diffluens, L.) loofe and ready to fall afunder.

DIFFLUOUS (diffus, L.) flowing forth, abroad or feveral ways.

To DIFFUND' (diffundere, L.) to pour out, to scatter abroad; alfo to diffufe or fpread

abroad.

DIFFUSEDNESS (of diffufus, L.) the being pured forth.

DIFFUSE (diffufus, L.) diffusive.
DIFFUSION, a pouring out; a spreading

abroad. L.

DIFFUSION (with Philofophers) is the difperfing the fubtil effluvia's of bodies into a

water, made thin, &c.
DILUTED (dilutus, L.) tempered with

DILUTENESS, faintnefs, weakness,

Spoken of Colours.

To DIMINISH (diminuo, Lat.) 1. To make lefs by abfciffion or deftruction of any part: the oppofite to encrease.

or increase pleasure, or diminish pain in us. That we call good which is apt to caufe

2. To impair, to leffen, to degrade.

Locke.

Impiously they thought Thee to diminif, and from thee withdraw The number of thy worshippers. Milton 3. To take any thing from that to which.

kind of atmosphere quite round them; as for belongs: the contrary to add.
example, the magnetical particles are diffused
every where round about the earth in parts

command you, neither shall you diminisl adjacent to it. And the light is diffufed by aught from it. Deut. iv. 2. rays of the fun, iffuing all round from that wonderful body of fire.

You fhall not add unto the word which •

the

T. DIGEST' (with Surgeons) to bring to maturity, to ripen.

DIGESTIBLENESS, eafinefs to be di

gefted.

To DIMINISH. To grow lefs; to be impaired.

Crete's ample fields diminish to our eye;
Before the boreal blafts the veffels fly.
Pope's Odyfey.
DIMINISHINGLY. In a manner tend-

DIGESTIVENESS (of digeftivus, L.)ing to vilify, cr leffen,

geftive faculty.

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to run with matter, or ripening or breaking fores, Cc.

DIAPHTHORA (diapofa, Gr.) corruption of any part.

DIARRHO'DON (in Pharmacy) a name given to feveral compofitions wherein red rofes are an ingredient.

DIASATYRION, an electuary where

a magiftrate elected in the great emergencies of the ftate, whofe office held fix months, and no longer, during which time he acted like an abfolute monarch, fo that from his featence there lay no appeal, not even in cafes of life and death.

Application was never made to this mag ftrate but in cafes that were difficult and dan

of the chief ingredient is Satyrion or Rag-gerous, when affairs could not well be ma

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of Cummin.

naged the ufual way.

There were 24 axes borne before the dictator, whereas a conful had but 12. DICTATORSHIP (dictatura, L.) the office and dignity of a dictator.

DICTATORY (diatorius, L.) pertaining to a dictator, or dictating.

DICTATRIX, a fhe-dictator or inditer, &c. L.

DICTYOIDES (of diutuo, a net, and fhape, Gr.) à mufcle, &c. in form

resembling a net.

DIASTEM' (in Antient Mufick) a name given to a fimple interval, in contradiction to a compound interval which they call a System. DIASTOLE (with Rhet.) a figure, when, between two words fome other word, and fometimes two words, are put between two words of the kind; as Di mea vota, Dii audire Lyce, Horace, Duc age, duc ad nos, &c. This figure is by the Latins called Separatio.

DIASTREM'MA (of diaggio, Gr.) to turn afide) a distortion or laxation.

DIATA'SIS (of diarsiva, Gr. to ftretch out) a diffenfion of any fort, particularly of a Himb in cafe of a fracture.

DIATERETICA (Sargnois, Gr.) the art of preferving health.

DIATE RESIS (ot diarngnois, Gr.) a good conftitution of the bones, when they are apt to move easily and strongly, fuch as the arms, bands, &c.

DIATHA MERON, a compound of dates. DIATONICK (of did and to, Gr.) as diatonick, mufick, which fee.

DIATUR BITH, an electuary of Turbith. DIAXYL'ALOES, a medicine made of the wood of aloes, L.

DICA'CIOUSNESS (dicacitas, L.) talkativeness; alfo buffoonery, drollery.

DICHOR/E'US (¿yópeC, Gr. i.e.compounded of two choreus's) a foot in verfe, either Greek or Latin, which confifts of four fyllables, of which the firft and third are long, and the fecond and fourth fhort, as Comprobare,

DICHOTOMIST (διχοτομία, Gr.) one who divides a thing into two parts.

DICÆOLOGY (dinziorozíz, Gr.) pleading one's caufe, and advocating for.

DICOTYLEDON (with Botanifis) a terr ufed of plants, which fpring with two fee leaves oppofite each other, as the generali of plants have.

DICTATION, a pronouncing or dictat of any thing to another man to be written him.

DICTATOR, a person who directs a ther what to write,

DICTATOR (with the antient Rom

DIDACTICALLY (of didactique, F. daƐlicus, L, of didanting of didaran, G. to teach) inftructively.

DIDYMOITO 'ΚΙΑ (διδυμοιτοκία οι διδ mo, twins, and Toxéw, Gr. to bring forthy a bearing twins.

DE DIE IN DIEM, from day to day, DIE'RESIS (diagnois of diagén, Gr.) the making two fyllables into one.

DIERESIS (with Surgeons) a feparation parts which are unnaturally joined together

and are an hindrance to a cure.

DIERESIS (with Anatomifis, &c.) a co fumption of the canals or veffels of an anima body, either by having fome paffages m that fhould not have been, or by the dilat of the natural paffages beyond their na ftate, by which the juices which fhould contained in them extravafe or run over. DIES, a day. L.

DIETETICK, pertaining to a regula prefcribed diet.

DIETICAL (of dieta, L. diarra, G appertaining to a prefcribed food, ora thod of eating and drinking.

DIFFERENCE (with Logicians)* fential attribute, which belongs to a which is not found in the Genus, univerfal idea of that species. ample, body and spirit or foul ir ture, are two fpecies of fubft

ideas do contain somethi
it fubftance; for in a1
bility and extenfion
er of cogitation,
and thence th
Detrable exten
it is cogitatir
EREN'TI
of that o
EREN

an

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