Imatges de pÓgina
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“Song charms the sense, but Eloquence the soul.".....MILTON.

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PHILADELPHIA :

PUBLISHED BY E. LITTELL.

French & Co. Printers.

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DISTRICT OF MARYLAND, SS.

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the twenty-first day of Feb

ruary, in the fifty-fifth year of the Independence of the United

States of America, John A. Getty, of the said district, hath deSEAL. posited in this office, the Title of a Book, the right whereof

he claims as Author, in the words following, to-wit:

Elements of Rhetoric; exhibiting a methodical arrange

ment of all the important ideas of the ancient and modern Rhetorical writers. Designed for the use of Colleges, Academies, and Schools.

By JOHN A. GETTY, A. M. “Song charms the sense, but eloquence the soul."-MILTON. In conformity to an Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled “An Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned;" and also to the Act, entitled “An Act supplementary to the Act, entitled An Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of Designing, Engraving, and Etching historical and other Prints."

PHILIP MOORE,
Clerk of the District of Maryland.

THE unanimous voice of every civilized nation has

awarded unfading laurels to the ancient orators of Greece

and Rome.

The thunder of DEMOSTHENES shook the

throne of the Macedonian Philip to its foundation, and

the weight of Cicero's unrivalled eloquence balanced,

for some time, the tottering Republic of Rome.

In the

composition of these Elements, the chief design of the

author has been to facilitate the acquisition of those high

and sublime ideas of oratory which are interspersed

throughout the ancient classics.

For this purpose he

has consulted the writings of AristOTLE, LONGINUS,

Cicero, QUINTILIAN, and other distinguished “heroes of antiquity.” He has also adopted, in many instances, the

sentiments of modern Rhetorical writers : and, in Elocu

tion, many of the most appropriate examples have been

selected from the Sacred Scriptures. The author now

offers his labours to the arbitration of the Public, and, to

its decision, he will implicitly submit.

Euston Academy, ( Md.) February 1, 1831.

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