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XL.

HASTINGS TO BRIGHTON, CHICHESTER, SOUTHAMPTON, AND

DORCHESTER, BY RAILWAY, 157 Miles.

ON RIGHT PROM HAST.

From

Dorches,

From
Hasting

ON LEFT FROM HAST.

From Hastings (St Branch to Hayward's

1324 Leonards) to Lewes, 244 Heath, on the Brighton Line (p. 24).

as in p. 26.

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The viaduct by which Ditchling Road the Hastings branch joins the main line is de

Tunnel, servedly admired : it

60 yards. consists of 27 arches, of which that which crosses Cross London road by the London road is elliptical, with a span of

curved viaduct, 330 Brighton Barracks. 50 feet, and at a height yards long, and enter above the ground of 73 feet. The other arches 1241 BRIGHTON

324 are semicircular, and of 30 feet span. The total length of the viaduct is

Thence by South Coast/ 400 yards.

Railway, past Worth-
ing, Arundel, and
Chichester, to

21 miles beyond HaBedhampton, and Bel 87 Havant St. (p. 81). | 70 vant, line to Portsmouth mont Castle.

branches off (see p. 61). Farlington.

The line here runs along Purbrook House, I mile.

the base of Portsdown, Langston Harbour. 447 feet high (see p. 36).

Portsea Island.

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42 or 38 Miles.

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XLII. LONDON TO RICHMOND, STAINES, AND WINDSOR, BY SOUTH

WESTERN RAILWAY, 26 Miles.

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Windsor is an ancient borough situated on the south bank of the Thames, 16 miles east of Reading, and 22 miles distant from London by the road through Brentford, Hounslow, and Colubrook. It possesses an ancient church, a theatre, barracks, and a good free school, and returns two members to Parliament. The town has no manufactures, and possesses in itself little to interest the stranger ; but the attractions of the adjacent castle make it the frequent resort of visitors, especially since the facility of communication afforled by the opening of the railways. Population, 1851, 9596.

Windsor Castle has been the principal seat of British royalty for nearly eight senturies. The Saxon kings had a palace at Old Windsor long previous to the Conquest. The present castle was founded by William the Conqneror, but was almost rebuilt by Edward III., with the assistance of the celebrated William of Wykeham, who was made clerk of the worka. Great alterations were nade by Sir Jeffry Wyatville during the reign of George IV. St George's Chapel is a eplendid specimen of florid Gothic architecture. It contains the stalls of the Knights of the Garter; and here the ceremony of installation takes place. At the east end of the chapel is the royal vault, where the remains of George III. and his Queen, George IV., the Princess Charlote, the Duke of Kent, the Duke of York, William IV. and his Queen, &c., are deposited. Edward IV. and his Queer, Henry VI., Henry VIII. and Jane Seymour, and Charles J., are also

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