Imatges de pÓgina
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Ing passed, iittle exertion is required to place the weary pedestrian by the side of Helvellyn Man-as the pile of stones on the summit is called—thence to gaze on the wonderful display of mountains and lakes which every where surround him. This Man, and that on a lower elevation, to the north, form the separating landmarks between Cumberland and Westmorland. And now, as to the view, and the multitudinous objects within its range. Northwards, Keppel Cove Tamn is perceived, having on the right Catchedecam. Beyond the extremity of the tarn Saddleback rears its huge form, a little to the left of which is Skiddaw. Between the two, and in the north-west, a portion of the Solway Firth is descried, and the extreme distance is bounded by the Scottish mountains. Turning eastwards, the Red Tarn below its “huge nameless rock,” lies between Sirel Fdge on the left, and Striding Edge on the right. Beyond is the crooked forn of UI leswater, on the left margin of which are Gowbarrow Park and Stybarrow Crag, whilst the right is bounded by the dwindled precipices of Place Fell, Beck Fell, and Swarth Fell' High Street and High Bell are seen in the east over Striding Edge. Kirkstone, Fairfield, and Dolly Waggon Pike, are more to the south. A portion of Windermere is seen over the last-named hill, whilst in a clear atmo sphere, Lancaster Castle can be descried beyond Windermere. Esthwaite water is directly south, and beyond is the sea in the Bay of Morecambe. In the southwest, the Old Man stands guarding the right shore of Coniston Lake. On the right is the assemblage of hills termed Coniston Fells, whilst Black Combe, beheld through Wrynose Gap, lifts its dreary summit in the distance. Bowfell and Langdale Pikes are more to the west, having on the left Scawfell Pikes and Scawfell, and on the right Great Gable. The " gorgeous pavilions” of the Buttermere mountains are pitched in the west, amongst which the Pillar and Gras moor are prominent. - Cat Bells are visible, though Derwentwater, upon the west margin of which they stand, is hidden. Our old acquaintance, Honister Crag, may be seen in a hollow, a little to the left of Cat Bells. From the lower Man views of Thirlemere and Bassenthwaite Lake are commanded, both of which are concealed by a breast of the mountain from those on the highest Man.

SKIDDAW. As this mountain stands at the head of an extensive valley, apart from the

Yes-proof was plain, that since the day
On which the traveller thus had died,
The dog had watched about the spot
Or by his mask wherever

through such long time,
He knows, who gave that love sublime,
And gave that strength of feeling great

Above all human estimate." Thus is this striking Instance of brute fidelity commemorated by Wordsworth. Sonte's IK on this secident commencing. "I climbed the dark brow of the mighty Helvellyn," are too inovo to be quoted at length

adjacent eminences, its huge bulk and great height are more strikingly apparent than those of the two former, although of inferior altitude to either of them. It is extremely easy of access, so much so, that ladies may ride on horseback from Keswick to the summit, a distance of six miles. According to the Government surveyors, its height is 3022 feet above the sea; upon one part of it granite is to be found, but the great mass of this mountain, as well as of Saddleback, is composed of a dark schistose stone. It is seldom ascended from any other place but Keswick, at which town every thing necessary for the expedition will be furnished. The Penrith road must be pursued for half-a-mile, to a bridge which spans the Greta just beyond the turnpike gate. Crossing the bridge the road passes Greta Bank House, and opposite the cottages adjoining take the road on the left which skirts Latrigg, at an elevation sufficient to command delightful views of Keswick vale. The main road which skirts Latrigg on the other side takes one very much out of the way. “This road," says Green, "is unequalled for scenic beauty in the environs of Keswick.” After leaving the bridge, a small plantation is traversed in front of Greta Bank, after which the road to be taken turns to the right. Proceeding onwards a few yards only, another road leading through a gate turns abruptly to the left by the side of a fence, which is followed for a distance of three quarters of a mile, to a hollow at the foot of the steepest hill on the ascent, having on the right a deep ravine, down which a transparent stream is seen falling. The path then holds along for about a mile by the side of a wall, which it crosses, and proceeds in a direct line forward, whilst the wall diverges to the right. A large and barren plain, called Skiddaw Forest, in the middle of which there is a spring of beautifully clear water, is then traversed for a mile, leaving a double-pointed elevation, called Skiddaw Low Man, the highest summit on the left; Skiddaw Man will then be ascended.

Many persons prefer the views whch they obtain during the ascent to that from the summit, and reasonably so, if beauty of scenery be sought for. A view will always be indistinct in proportion as it is extensive. Nothing can exceed the charming appearance of the valley and town of Keswick, of Derwentwater and its surrounding eminences, when beheld from the mountain's side; the lake especially, with its bays and islands, is nowhere seen to such advantage. In consequence of Skiddaw being exposed to the blasts of the west wind from the Irish Channel, the visitor will not be inclined, from the intense cold, to stay long on the guinmit; we shall therefore proceed to run over hastily the names of the principal objects which are visible from that elevated position. In the north, beyond the lowlands of Cumberland, in which Carlisle and its cathedral are perceived, the Solway Frith is seen, on the further side of which the Scottish mountains are displayed in fine arrangement. Criffell is seen over Skiddaw Far Man, and the Moffat and Cheviot hills stretch away to the right. Dumfries is visible at the mouth of the frith. In the north-west, over High Pike and Long Brow, the vale and town of Penrith are beheld, with Cross Fell (2901 feet) beyond. Directly east is the rival summit of Saddleback, separated by the tract called Skiddaw Forest from the mountain on which the spectator is standing. Helvellyn is in the south-east; beyond, Ingleborough in Yorkshire is dimly descried. Between Hel

rellyn and Saddleback, Place Fell, at the head of Ulleswater, and High Street are visible. When the atmosphere is clear, Lancaster Castle may be seen in the southeast. Derwentwater is not comprehended in the view from the highest Man, being concealed by some of the other eminences of Skiddaw, but from the third man a perfect bird's-eye prospect of that lake is obtained. In the south “ there is a succession of five several ranges of mountain seen out-topping each other, from a stripe of the lovely valley to the highest of the Pikes. Grisedale in one grand line stretches from the inclosures at Braithwaite to its Pike, succeeded in the second range by Barrow Sule End, and Utterside. Rising from the fields of Newlands, the third range commences with Rolling End, ascending from which are Causey Pike, Scar Crag, Top Sail, Ill Crags, and Grasmoor,--the latter lessening the Pike of Grisedale by appearing over its top. The fourth line in this wild combination is composed of Cat Bells, Maiden-moor, Dalehead, Hinds garth, Robinson, High Crag, High Stile, and Red Pike. The fifth and last is that sublime chain of summits, extending on the south from Coniston to Ennerdale on the north ; amongst these the High Pike or Man, standing towering over the rest, has on the left Great End, Hanging Knott, Bow Fell, and the Fells of Coniston ; on the right, Lingmell Crags, Great Gable, Kirk Fell, Black Sail, the Pillar, the Steeple, and the Hay Cock, with Yewbarrow and part of the Screes through the pass at Black Sail. On the right of Grisedale Pike and Hobcarten Crag is Low Fell, succeeded by Whinfield Fell, over which, in a clear atmosphere, may be observed more than the northern half of the Isle of Man ; and on a mistless sunny evening, even Ireland may be seen. The north-west end or foot of Bassenthwaite Water is here scen, the head being obscured by Longside."* Workington can be seen at the mouth of the Derwent in the west, and more to the north the coast towns of Maryport and Allonby. The town and castle of Cockermouth are perceived, over the extremity of Bassenthwaite Lake, seated on the Cocker. Such is an outline of this wonderful panorama, which may be fitly closed with Wordsworth's fine sonnet :

“Pelion and Ossa flourish side by side,
Together in immortal books enrolld;
His ancient dower Olympus hath not sold,
And that aspiring hill, which did divide
Into two ample horns his forehead wide,
Shines with poetic radiance as of old;
While not an English mountain we behold
By the celestial Muses glorified.
Yet round our sea-girt shore they rise in crowds;
What was the great Parnassus' self to thee,
Mount Skiddaw? In his natural sovereignty,
Our British hill is nobler far, he shrouds
His double front among Atlantic clouds,
and pours forth streams more sweet than Castaly."

• Green's Guide.

CONISTON OLD MAN. Tors njoantain stands at the north-west angle of Coniston Lake, from the eastera shore of which it presents a magnificent appearance. It is 2577 feet in height, forming the highest peak of the range called Coniston Fells. It is composed of a fine roofing slate, for the excavation of which there are several large quar ries. The slates are carried down the lake by means of boats, and, at its termi nation, are carted to Ulverston. There are also some valuable copper-mines upoo this mountain, belonging to Rev. Sir R. Fleming of Rydal, who is Lord of the Manor. There are three tarns upon the Old Man, called Levers Water, Low Water, and Gates Water. The first lies between that mountain and Wether lam, a stupendous hill on the north ; and the last is placed at the foot of Love Crag. Low Water, notwithstanding its name, is the highest

The most eligible mode of ascending the Old Man is to leave the village of Coniston by the Walna Scar road, and, pursuing the way along the common for a few hundred yards, to take a path which will be seen to climb the mountain side on the right. This path leads directly up to the Man, finely built on the edge of a precipice overhanging Low Water. There is a fine open view to the Bouth, embracing the estuaries of the Kent, Leven, and Duddon, a long line 0 coast, and, in serene weather, the Isle of Man. Snowdon may be distinguished on a very clear day. It appears a little to the left of Black Combe, over Mit lum Park. In the home views, the eye will be attracted by Coniston Lake, the whole length of which is immediately below the spectator. A part of Winder mere can be seen more to the east. On other sides, the Old Man is surrounded by high mountains, which wear an aspect of imposing grandeur from this eleration. Scawfell and Bowfell are particularly fine, and the apex of Skiddaw can be discerned in the distance.

LANGDALE PIKES. The two peculiarly shaped hills, which stand at the head of the valley of Great Langdale, though known by the general name of Langdale Pikes, have separate names. The most southerly is termed Pike o' Stickle, and is lower by 100 feet than Harrison Stickle, which is 2400 feet in height. They are of a purphyritic structure, and, on account of their steepness, are somewhat difficult to ascend. They are conspicuous objects from the upper end of Windermere, and from the road leading from Kendal to Ambleside. They are usually ascended during the Langdale excursion, (as to which see page 277,) but pedestrians would have no difficulty in making the ascent from the Stake, or from Grasmere through Easdale. The easiest mode, however, is that from Langdale. A guide can be procured at Milbecks, where tourists commonly take some refreshment. The dath pursues a peat road leading to Stickle Tarn, well known to the angler for its fine trout, which lies under a lofty ridge of rock called Pavey Ark. This tarn must be left on the right, and a streannlet which runs down the hill-side take: is a guide. The path hecomes at this part exceedingly steep, but a little poids

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