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High Street. Having left the Mortal Man three miles behind, and climbed the side of Kirkstone for some distance, a road through the fields, on the left, will be discovered, which passes in succession three farm-houses, High Grove, Middle Grove, and Low Grove, in Stockdale, and enters Ambleside, three miles from the deviation.

A favourite excursion, with the temporary residents in Ambleside, is that through the two LANGDALES. If the object of the tourist be merely to view the vale of Great Langdale (the finer of the two) with Dungeon Gill Force, and to ascend the Pikes, he will traverse a road perfectly practicable for carriages; but if he desire to see something more of the country, by visiting Skelwith and Colwith Forces, Little Langdale and Blea Tarns, he must be content to go on horseback, in a car, or on foot. This circuit, which we shall describe, is about eighteen miles in length. With the intention, then, of visiting the two Langdales in succession, the tourist will leave Ambleside by the road to Clappersgate, winding on the banks of the Brathay, (near the source of which he will be ere long,) under the craggy heights of Loughrigg Fell. A newly-built chapel will be observed in a charming situation on the south bank of the river. “Sweeter stream-scenery," says Wilson, “ with richer fore, and loftier back-ground, is nowhere to be seen within the four seas.” A few hundred yards above Skelwith Bridge (three miles from Ambleside) the stream is precipitated over a ledge of rock, making a fall twenty feet in height. The cascade is not so remarkable in itselt, as for the magnificent scenery around it. Langdale Pikes have a peculiarly striking appearance. By this bridge the traveller is conducted into Lancashire, in which county the road does not continue for more than a mile before it reenters Westmorland at Colwith Bridge. A short distance above the bridge, the stream, issuing from a tarn farther up, makes a fine cascade called Colwith Force. It is in a dell close to the road, and is about 70 feet high. A stupendous mountain, called Wetherlamb, occupies a conspicuous position in a chain of lofty hills on the south-west. Proceeding, Little Langdale Tarn becomes visible on the left-on the right is Lingmoor, a hill which serves as a partition between the two Langdales. At the termination of the inclosed land, amongst a few trees, are two dwellings, called Fell Foot, seven and a-half miles from Ambleside. One of them was formerly an inn, whereat the gangs of pack-horses were refreshed previous to their ascent of the mountain passes of Wrynose and Hardknot-this being the route by which the manufactures of Kendal were transported to the western coast. Taking the road to the right, and ascending some distance between the mountains, a solitary pool of water, named Blea Tarn, is perceived in the bottom of an elevated depression. Those magnificent objects,

the two huge peaks That from some other vale peer into this, are the two Pikes of Langdale. The more southern one is named Pike o'Stickle -the other, and higher, Harrison Stickle. Hlaving passed the tarn, the road

winds down a steep descent into the head of Great Langdale, that part of it called Mickleden, through which is the road over the Stake into Borrowdale, being right before the eye. Mill Becks, a farm-house, at which refreshment is usually taken, is soon reached. Here a guide to Dungeon Gill Force, and to the sunmit of the Pikes, can be obtained. The former is a fall of water, formed by a stream which runs down a fissure in the mountain's side not far above the house. A curious natural arch has been made, by a large stone having rolled from a higher part of the mountain, and got wedged in between the cheeks of rock. Over the bridge thus formed, ladies have been known, like Wordsworth's Idle Shepherd Boy, to possess the intrepidity to pass. * Two roads traverse the valley, one of which keeps under the hills on the left, the other takes the middle of the vale ;-the former is to be preferred by those unencumbered with carriages. One mile and a half from Mill Becks, is the little Chapel of Langdale whence a road strikes up the hill-side, crossing Red Bank into Rydal, or Gras mere. A large sheet of water, lying amongst the meadows, which now comes into sight, is Elterwater Tarn, at the head of which stands Elterwater Hall. The stream feeding the tarn is crossed by a bridge, a short distance above the tarn. Near the bridge are the works of Elterwater Gunpowder Company. A little further in a recess, on the flank of Loughrigg Fell, is Loughrigg Tarn, a lovely spoi on which Wilson has composed some beautiful lines. Ambleside is only the miles beyond.

Ambleside abounds with villas. Among them may be named, Fux Ghy!! (H. Roughsedge, Esq.), Fox Howe (Mrs Arnold), Rothay Bank (J. Crossfield, Esq.), Oak Bank (C. Robinson, Esq.), The Cottage (H. P. Lutwidge, Esq.), The Oaks (Dr Dary), The Knoll (Miss Martineau), Covey Cottage (G. Partridge, Esq.), Bellevue (M. Harrison, Esq.), Green Bank (B. Harrison, Esq.), Hill Top (T. Carr, Esq.), Brathay Hall (G. Redmayne, Esq.), Croft Lodge (J. Holmes, Esq.), Wanlass How (Mrs Brenchley), Wansfell Holme (J. Hornby, Esq.) Wray Castle (J. Dawson, Esq.), Rydal Hall (Rev. Sir R. Fleming), Rydal Mount (the residence of the late William Wordsworth, Esq.), Glen Rothay (W. Ball Esq.), Allan Bank (Thomas Dawson, Esq.), The Cottage (Mrs. Orrell).

ULVERSTON.

(Inns:-Sun; Braddyll's Arms.) ULVERSTON, a market-town and port, containing about 6433 inhabitants, situate in that division of Lancashire, termed “ North of the Sands," is supposed to de rive its name from Ulph, a Saxon Lord. It is about a mile from the estuary and the Leven, with which it is connected by a canal, constructed in 1795, and cs

• " There is a spot which you may see

If ever you to Langdale go.
Into a chasm, a mighty block
Hath fallen, and made a bridge of rock :
The gulf is deep below,
And in a basin black and small,
Receives a lofty Waterfall."

WORDSWCRTI.

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Statute Miles.

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