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on the cultivated vegetables, and, vided by Nature with a kind of leaving their tracks in the snow, Winter-quarters, which secure them are frequently hunted down, or from the effects of cold. Those caught in snares. The hen-roosts called herbaceous, which lie down are pillaged by foxes, polecats, and to the root every Autumn, are now small beasts of prey which our safely concealed under ground, precountry breeds; but we are now paring their new shoots to burst happily unacquainted with the ra- forth when the earth is softened by venous troops of wolves, bears, and Spring. Shrubs and trees, which other fierce creatures, which, urged are exposed to the open air, have by famine at this season, often ter- all their soft and tender parts rify the villagers in the mountainous closely wrapped up in buds, which and woody regions on the continent. by their firmness resist all the force The domestic cattle now require of frost. If one of these buds be all the care and protection of the now carefully opened, it is found to farmer. Sheep are often lost in the consist of young leaves rolled tosudden storms by which the snow gether, which are afterwards to is drifted in the hollows, so as to adorn the Spring. Some of these bury them a great depth beneath it. are much forwarder than others. Yet they have been known to sur- The leaves of the woodbine appear vive many days in this situation. just ready to expand by the end of Cows, with much ado, scratch up a the month; the flowers of the mefew mouthfuls of grass; but for zereon and snowdrop appear on the their chief subsistence they must point of blowing; and the catkin or depend upon the hay and other male flower branch of the hazel beprovisions of the farm-yard. Early gins to unfold. lambs and calves are kept within doors, and tended with as much care as the farmer's own children. Thomson beautifully alludes to this period of the year in the following lines:

During the severity of the frost, little work can de done out of doors by the husbandman. As soon as it sets in, he takes the opportunity of the hardness of the ground to draw manure to his fields. He lops and cuts timber, and mends thorn When the roads become hedges. smooth from the frozen snow, he takes his team, and carries hay and corn to the market, or brings fuel for himself and neighbours. The barn resounds with the flail, by the use of which the labourer is enabled to defy the cold weather.

for fuel and food, and charity is In towns, the poor are pinched peculiarly called for at this comfortless time of the year. Many branches of art are at a stand during the severity of the frost. Rivers and canals being frozen up, watermen and bargemen are frequently desti

The plants of this season are pro-tute of employment. The harbours

"Now, shepherds, to your helpless charge be kind,

Baffle the raging year, and fill their pens
With food at will; lodge them below the

storm

And watch them strict; for from the bellowing East,

In this dire season, oft the whirlwind's

wing
Sweeps up the burthen of whole wintry
plains

At one wide waft, and o'er the hapless
flocks,
Hid in the hollow of two neighbouring
hills,
The billowy tempest whelms; till upward
urg'd,

The valley to a shining mountain swells,
Tipt with a wreath high-curling in the sky."

in this island, however, are never or very rarely locked up by the ice, as they are for many months in the northern parts of Europe.

The following are the astronomical appearances which will take place during the ensuing month:

First quarter of the moon, takes place on the 3rd, at 43 minutes past six in the morning.

She will be full (or in opposition to the sun) on the 10th, at 20 minutes past seven at night.

or

Her last quarter occurs on the 19th, at 25 minutes before one in the morning, and she becomes new, in conjunction with the sun, on the 19th, at 52 minutes past one in the morning.

The moon is in apogee, or the greatest distance from the earth, on the 14th, and in her perigee, or the nearest distance from our planet, on the 27th. On the 15th, she is in conjunction with Jupiter, with Saturn on the 21st, and with Venus on the 28th. Mercury is visible to unassisted vision, near the western horizon, in the ings, during the first week of this month.*

even

The amusements of sliding, skaiting, and other pastimes on the ice, give life to this dreary season; but our frosts are not continued and steady enough to afford us such a share of these diversions as some other nations enjoy.

"Where the Rhine extends, Branch'd out in many a long canal, From every province swarming, void of

care,

Batavia rushes forth; and as they sweep, On sounding skates, a thousand different

ways,

In circling poise, swift as the winds along, The then gay land is maddened all to joy. Nor less the northern coasts, wide o'er the

snow,

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THE religious world is deluged with sermons, which is the chief reason why, instead of being valued according to their intrinsic

lected

worth, they are, by the great majority, negOn the accession of her present Majesty, [on whom we pray every possible blessing, both spiritual and temporal,] not a few sermons, preached on the occasion, were published by many eminent divines, and among them all, we know of no one discourse more worthy of preservation, and extensive circulation, than the one now before us. We have been much pleased and edified by the perusal, and feel persuaded that it cannot fail to do good to every reader into whose hands it may fall.

Chemical Recreations: a Compendium of

Experimental Chemistry. By John Joseph Griffin. 12mo., pp. 326 Eighth Edition. Richard Griffin and Co., Glasgow; Tegg and Son, London.

THIS is part first, comprising Chemical Manipulation, and Analysis by the Blowpipe. By the advertisement, we learn that part the second, a Course of Testing, comprising an Elementary Introduction to Qualitative Chemical Analysis; and part third, Systematic Chemistry, comprising an account of Chemical Elements and their Compounds, illustrated by experiments, are to make their appearance before the public in due time. We hope that our old friend Griffin will not impose too large a tax on the patience of his numerous admirers. This valuable work, now open before us, has reached its eighth edition, which fact is

* Rogerson's Temporis Calendarium, for alone a sufficient recommendation.

1838.

To those who delight in exploring the ar

their aid so far as they could, in establishing a Society so plainly accommodated to the circumstances and condition of this large and rapidly increasing Town.

canum of nature, this volume will prove a valuable acquisition. In talent and utility, it is equal to any work of the kind in the English language, and in several respects superior to every other. A great deal of Your Committee, in making these remarks, nonsense has been written and published having reference to their previous engageabout chemical affinity, but our author wisely ments, would have it distinctly understoood, rejects the doctrine in toto. "The reason, ," that they do not by any means regret the says Mr. Griffin, "that so much nonsense has step they have taken. They are grateful been published about this affinity, is, simply, that so much has been done, and anticipate that chemists have been desirous of envelop- further success. But your Committee do reing their ignorance in a cloak of mystery.gret the manifest indifference and apathy of There stood the plain fact before the world, many Young Men, to the means of improvethat bodies combined together, and chemists knew not why, but, the chemists not liking to say so, and not liking even to think so, persuaded themselves, and then tried to convince the world, that they did know why; they said that bodies combined together in virtue of their affinity for one another. This was pretty. The credulous stared, and amazement gave place to belief." (Introduction, pp. xxv.) This is blowing up the wonder-working nomenclature with a witness. To all the multifarious sorts of affinity into which the ingenuity of sophists has divided the primary doctrine of chemistry, and which is so well calculated to mislead, perplex, and mystify the ignorant and unwary, the author bids, "rosy dreams and slumbers light attend them all," and finally wishes them a very good night. We say, ditto.

INTELLIGENCE.

Manchester Branch.

AT our Quarterly Meeting, on Friday, 1st December, the following report was laid before the Members of this Branch, which we forward to you, indulging the hope that our next Report will be more encouraging to you and to ourselves.

Your Committee one, the members of which were already fully engaged in many 'labours of love,' at the time of the formation of this Branch; so that they were not in a condition to give that attention to the interests of the Society which its importance demands. But apprehending the scheme of the Society to be one admirably calculated for the mental and moral improvement of Young Men, and more especially for the exigences of the Young Men of Manchester; and further, being urged to form themselves into Committee, by the zeal of their pious founder, Mr. Nasmith, they resolved to lend

ment placed within their reach; itself a striking proof of the existing necessity for such a Society. Our Quarterly Meetings and Lectures, though highly interesting and instructive, have been but thinly attended. This has been discouraging to those who take a part, and are interested in our welfare.

Believing, however, that it was always so in the world, that the attempt to raise it in the scale of morals and of purity, has been, and will continue to be resisted; your Committee purpose, under the blessing of God, to persevere in their efforts, if by any means the Youth of this town may be awakened to a consideration of their true interests.

Eleven Associations have been formed, of which seven are in operation-comprising ninety-one members. Of the remaining four Associations,-one has ceased to meet through various discouragements, and three are not yet at work.

In September, a Sermon was preached to the Members, by the Rev. C. P. Burton, L. L. D., when the Church was crowded, and considerable interest excited.

A course of six Lectures, on the principles of Geology, has been delivered by Mr. W. C. Williamson, Curator of the National History Society, of this town; which, it is hoped, has excited, in all who heard them, a desire to acquaint themselves with the numerous works of "Him by whom the worlds were framed." Forty Essays have been read during the past quarter.

Most of the Members are engaged in Sabbath School Teaching, many in Distributing Tracts, and a few in Visiting the Sick. The Reports from the Associations are on the whole of an encouraging kind, notwithstanding the difficulties they have met with. Signed,

T. H. WILLIAMS,
WALTER CADDELL,

Manchester,
December, 1837.

London: T. RILEY, Printer, 10, King Street, Tower Hill.

Secretaries.

THE

YOUNG MEN'S

No. 14.]

MAGAZINE.

[VOL. II.

with feeble man. All these are actions worthy of a God.

But talk of his vigilant protection in constant exercise over the meanest MAN, when in the pride of his of his creatures, and observance of own intellect he substitutes opinions their most insignificant actions, and hastily formed, by a judgment at either a laugh of derision, or oftener best but weak and superficial, for perhaps, and by which more is inthe declaration of sacred writ, is ferred, a contemptuous silence is guilty, not only of an unbelief as unpardonable as it is criminal, but not unfrequently also of inconsistencies as absurd as they are contemptible.

your only reply.

He, however, who has attained to the greatest perfection in the knowledge of the Divine Being, whether possessing the most exalted genius

He will allow of a Creator, and and intellectual power, or but little Supreme Governor of the universe, enlightened in secular science, is who in the exercise of his omnipo- ever willing to acknowledge his firm tence could make the graves yield belief that he who " fills the universe up their dead-unlock the rugged with his majesty," and "governs all well, "and make the pure streams things by the word of his power," gush forth "-prepare a fish for the disdains not to visit the abode of reception of a disobedient prophet- the meanest of his creatures-to and convert the poorest water into watch over and guard him-to listen the richest wine. Nor is he pre- to his prayers-to regard his humpared to deny that but a word from blest wishes-and "attend with pathe same infinite Being sufficed to rental affection and solicitude to the check the fury of the winds, curb most secret sorrows and anxieties of the of the mighty ocean, and in his bosom." "He is about our path rage one moment convert the boisterous and our bed, and spieth out all our violence of the former and foaming ways." billows of the latter into an un- Had God, as it has been well reclouded sky and an unruffled sea. marked, formed this world and then Nay, further, his credulity is not left it to its own governance, he affected at the narration of the effect would "in it have created a Deity of the same power when exercised equal to himself," and capable, like upon spirits which, though "fallen himself, of executing those orders and from their high estate," are yet arrangements which are peculiar to a mighty and powerful when compared Being omniscient and omnipresent.

VOL. II.

C

FEBRUARY, 1838.

GOD'S SUPERINTENDENCE OF MAN, AND MAN'S ACCOUNTABILITY TO HIM.

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their aid so far as they could, in establishing a Society so plainly accommodated to the circumstances and condition of this large and rapidly increasing Town.

canum of nature, this volume will prove a valuable acquisition. In talent and utility, it is equal to any work of the kind in the English language, and in several respects superior to every other. A great deal of Your Committee, in making these remarks, nonsense has been written and published having reference to their previous engageabout chemical affinity, but our author wisely ments, would have it distinctly understoood, rejects the doctrine in toto. "The reason,' that they do not by any means regret the says Mr. Griffin, "that so much nonsense has step they have taken. They are grateful been published about this affinity, is, simply, that so much has been done, and anticipate that chemists have been desirous of envelop-further success. But your Committee do reing their ignorance in a cloak of mystery.gret the manifest indifference and apathy of There stood the plain fact before the world, many Young Men, to the means of improvethat bodies combined together, and chemists ment placed within their reach; itself a knew not why, but, the chemists not liking striking proof of the existing necessity for to say so, and not liking even to think so, such a Society. Our Quarterly Meetings and persuaded themselves, and then tried to con- Lectures, though highly interesting and invince the world, that they did know why; structive, have been but thinly attended. they said that bodies combined together in This has been discouraging to those who take virtue of their affinity for one another. a part, and are interested in our welfare. This was pretty. The credulous stared, and amazement gave place to belief." (Introduction, pp. xxv.) This is blowing up the wonder-working nomenclature with a witness. To all the multifarious sorts of affinity into which the ingenuity of sophists has divided the primary doctrine of chemistry, and which is so well calculated to mislead, perplex, and mystify the ignorant and unwary, the author bids, "rosy dreams and slumbers light attend them all," and finally wishes them a very good night. We say, ditto.

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Believing, however, that it was always so in the world, that the attempt to raise it in the scale of morals and of purity, has been, and will continue to be resisted; your Committee purpose, under the blessing of God, to persevere in their efforts, if by any means the Youth of this town may be awakened to a consideration of their true interests.

Eleven Associations have been formed, of which seven are in operation-comprising ninety-one members. Of the remaining four Associations,-one has ceased to meet through various discouragements, and three are not yet at work.

In September, a Sermon was preached to the Members, by the Rev. C. P. Burton, L. L. D., when the Church was crowded, and considerable interest excited.

A course of six Lectures, on the principles of Geology, has been delivered by Mr. W. C. Williamson, Curator of the National History Society, of this town; which, it is hoped, has excited, in all who heard them, a desire to acquaint themselves with the numerous works of "Him by whom the worlds were framed." Forty Essays have been read during the past quarter.

Your Committee is one, the members of which were already fully engaged in many 'labours of love,' at the time of the formaMost of the Members are engaged in Sabtion of this Branch; so that they were not in bath School Teaching, many in Distributing a condition to give that attention to the inter-Tracts, and a few in Visiting the Sick. ests of the Society which its importance The Reports from the Associations are on demands. But apprehending the scheme of the whole of an encouraging kind, notwiththe Society to be one admirably calculated standing the difficulties they have met with. for the mental and moral improvement of Young Men, and more especially for the exigences of the Young Men of Manchester; and further, being urged to form themselves into Committee, by the zeal of their pious founder, Mr. Nasmith, they resolved to lend

Signed,

T. H. WILLIAMS,

WALTER CADDELL,)

Manchester,
December, 1837.

London: T. RILEY, Printer, 10, King Street, Tower Hill.

Secretaries.

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