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dicated with that precision which might have been expected. The mark of an anchor at the mouth, and of another on the precise spot to which they are navigable, is adopted in the French maps of this nature ; and it would be a still further improvement if there were merely a stroke across the river, and the number of tons added.

SUPPLEMENT

TO THE

REVIEW OF MAPS;

CONTALYING Extracts from the foreign Journals, 'concerning those which seemed

interesting, but have not yet reached England, or, at least, have

not fallen under our Observation * - AT Vienna has appeared a new and corrected edition, in two large sheets, of Ecker's Northern and Southern Hemispheres, laid down stereographically for the horizon of Vienna. These maps were first published in 1794, and form a part of Schrabie's General Atlas of Germany. - From the account of them given in the Journal of Gaspari, it appears that they do not contain the discoveries of Vancouver or of La Pérouse. They seem to be in imitation of the two Planispheres, published at Berlin in 1783, by professor Bode ; but the outline of the coasts is not delineated with equal exactness, and there are several errors of longitude and latitude. There is a volume of letter-press, which is itself far from being immaculate.

Şotzmann has published at Berlin a Map of the Northern Part of Upper Saxony, which contains the March of Brandenburg and the duchy of Pomerania, with the post-roads, &c.; being a kind of reduction of his provincial maps. But these maps are not trigonometrical; and it is surprising that the Germans, who pretend to such geographical hypercriticism, should not give the example of tolerable maps of their own country. Yet the barbarous division into antiquated circles, and the distinct interests of the petty sovereignties, must prove obstacles to such a design. There seems also to remain a radical want of taste in the Germans, who are more inclined to plod in the quarries of literature, than to build palaces. The very use of the old black letter in their publications is a sufficient proof of barbarism; and even the maps published under the eye of the journalists, from observations at the observatory near Gotha, -ironically, by some of our map-sellers, called Mr. Seeberg's works, from the German Sternwarte Seeberg, i.e. an observatory, may indeed be accurate, but are such poor productions, and so destitute of taste and information, that no collector of maps would wish to possess one of them.

* It is almost unnecessary to mention, that, in this part of our Review, we must chiedy abide by the opinion of the foreign journalists,

Baron Hermelin's Atlas of Sweden is nearly completed; the first division containing the northern provinces, the second division Finland, and the third Sweden Proper. It is accompa. nied with views of various parts of the country : :

1. The fall of the Hadtjajock on the lake Saggal, in Lulea Lappmark ;

2. View of the range of mountains at Quickjack, in Lulen Lappmark;

3. Gilliware, from the southern bank of the Wassera Elf, ja Lulea Lappmark; .

4. View of the mountain Wigeln over the lake Oresund, from Beckaas in Norway;

5. View of the mountain Ruten from the north-east end of the lake Malmagen; ii

6. View of the range of mountains between Herjeadalen and Norway, taken from Mount Funnesdal;

7. View of the forges and smelting-houses at Ljusnedal, in Herjeadalen;'

8. View from Wermasvuori towards the lakes Jockijavoi and Umolanselka.

9. View of Stockholm. .

The latter sheets are superior in neatness and accuracy to the first; but the journalists of Weimar exclaim as usual against the neglect of astronomical observations. We must remind them that the study of geography is very widely diffused; while not one in a thousand pays any attention to the astronomical part, after having learned the elements of geography. In read, ing books of history or travels, &c. maps are consulted with a view to the relative situations of places, and a general conventional accuracy is all that is expected. Few readers are so ignorant as not to know that a map or plain surface cannot represent any part of a sphere with complete mathematical precision; nor must it be forgotten that astronomical observations depend on the skill of the observers, and that many are found to be erroneous.

We agree however with the foreign journalists concerning

the advantage of computing the longitude from a fixed and general meridian; and it is to be wished that the French and English would abandon the computation from Paris and Greenwich, and return to that from Ferro, or some other more western spot, than which there could not be a more essential improvement in geography.

Of Von Gorog's maps of the Provinces of Hungary, twentytwo sheets were completed some time ago. They are divided according to counties, the meridian being taken from Ofen or Buda, and form the most complete Atlas of Hungary which has yet appeared.

* M. Gussefeld has published a new map of the Hartz and circumjacent countries, for the use of travelers who visit that interesting part of Germany—the size of the map being about twenty-one inches by fifteen. The mountains of the Hartz are represented in three profiles; and the whole is well calculated to assist the researches of the traveler, and to exhibit the topography of that singular region.

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** In our next we hope to give ample accounts of two capital performances; Mr. Arrowsmith's New Map of North America; and Mr. Faden's County of Kent, from the plates of the Grand Trigonometrical Survey of England.

ALPHABETICAL INDEX

TO THE

AUTHORS' NAMES & TITLES OF BOOK'S.

223

585

142

ABERCROMBY (sir Ralph), Lines Arts (fine), Dissertation on progress of,
A on the death of,
S52

478
-Ode to Atkinson's Rodolpho,

229
the memory of,

353 Atlas (new English), Cary's, 585
Addresses to io habitants of certain pa-

., Smith's, 587
- rishes in archdeaconry of Lincoln, Ariary, Visits to the,

227
Adelmorn, the outlaw,

231 BALTIC straits, Chart of,
Adelphi,

239 Bankers (Impolicy of returning) to par-
Adultery, Sermon on the sin of, 106 liament,

338
Advice to minister of gospel, 104 Bantry-harbour, Survey of, 588
Africa, Map of,
581 Barrett's magus,

406
Agriculture (Systein followed during the Batavian republic, Tour through, 996
two last years by the board of) fure Bath, Excursions from,

277
ther illustrated,
467 Bear-haven, Surrey ol,

598
of Lincolnshire, General Beauties of England and Wales, 397"
vicw of, 261.-Review of ditto, ib. - of Wiltshire,

58
of Perthshire, General view* Bed does's collection of testimonies re-
of,

423 specting treatment of Venereal discase
Aikin (Lucy)'s poetry for children, 111 by nitrous acid,

464
Alfonso, king of Castile,
355 Belinda,

235
Allred, an epic poem,

361 Belsham's elements of the philosophy of
Alwood's literary antiquities of Greece, the mind,

11, 131

history of Great-Britain, 23
Alonzo and Cora,

229 Berdmore's specimens of literary resem-
America (South), Chart of the coasts blance, ;

87
of,
535 Bidlake's scrinons,

434
American United states, Map of, 579 Billiards, Instructions for playing, 477
Anatomist's vade-mecum,

350 Black's conjunction of Jupiter and Ve.
Andree's cases and observations on treate nus in Leo,

474
ment of fistula in ano, &c. 466

Free school,

230
Angling in the Trent, Observations on, Blagdon controversy. - Force of con-

360
trast,

120
Annales de Chymie,

502 Bliss's experiments on medicinal waters
Annotations on the gospels, 220 of Hampstead and Kilburn, 350
Annual register (New) for 1800, 269 Blow (A) at the root of infidelity, 460
Anti-Jacobin reviewers--Imposture ex Boa constrictor,

338
posed, &c.

239 Boileau's satire on man, Translation of
Antiquities (Literary) of Greece, 11,

228
131 Bonaparte, Life of,

169
Apology for the sabbath,
345 Booker's fast sermon,

463
Archbishops and bishops of church of Boscawen's poems,

431
England, Letter to,
England, Letter to

118 Bowels (affection of the frequent and
Ariel, or the invisible monitor,

.
356

malin E.Indies, Létter respecting, 463

fatalin E.Indies, Letter respecting, 465
Arrowsmith's inap of American United Bowles on the conclusion of ihe war, 102
states,

'579 's suppleinent de Reflexions on
- Turkey in Europe, State of suciety at close of 19th cene
580 tury,

30
Ape. Vol. 34.

356

tant,

Bread, a poem,

80 Corn-Proposals for keeping its price at
Britain, History of Great, . 23 what it ought 10 bear,

104
New map of,

589 Corry's Detector of quackery, 120
Britton's Beauties of England and Wales, Cowper (Wm.)'s sketch of the charac-

397 ter, &c. of rev. John Cowper, 258
- Beauties of Wiltshire, 58 Cow-pox, Treatise on the,

331
Brock's Importance of religion to mili. Coxe's historical tour in Monmouthshire,
tary life,
107

302
Burder's village sernions,

454 Crabb's Order and method of instructing
Burns, Second essay on,
224 children,

297
Butcher's moral tales,

352 Croft's sermon on the peace, 107

on thanksgiving for fa-
CARLISLE (Earl of)'s tragedies and vorable harvest,

107
poems,

68 Crosbie (Sir E. W.), Narrative of the
Cary's new English Atlas, 585 apprehension, trial, and execution of,
Castle without a spectre,

355
Cépède (La)'s natural history of fishes, Cullyer's gentleman and farmer's 'assis.
532

467
Ceuta and Tetuan bays, Chart of, 587
Chains of the heart,

232 DALLAS's translation of Ordinaire's
Chamberlain's Blow at the root of infi- natural history of volcanoes, 381
delits,
460 Dancer's medical assistant,

996
Chainberlin's Ocean,
354 Dawn of peace,

470
Channel (British), New chart of the Dead, Letters of the,

337
589 Defence of public education,

917
Charge to clergy of diocese of Durham, Delaval,

476
340 Denmark, Literature of,

56?
Charlton (Mary)'s Pirate of Naples, 476 Detector of quackery,

120
Chemistry, Annals of,
502 Dictionary, Thespian,

476
M ., Manual of thcaretic and Distresses of the times, Reflexions occa-
practical,
543 sioned by,

106
- Synoptic tables of, 77 Donovan's natural history of the insects
Children, Treatise on physical educa. of China,
tion of,
157 Dorothea,

238
Chouan army, Hint respecting, 103 Drainage of fens in Lincolnshire, Letters
Christianity, Internal and presumptive on,

349
evidences of,

455 DRAMATIC.
Church of England vindicated from mis Adelmorn,

s
représentation,
457 Alfonso,

355
-, Letter to archbishops Chains of the heart,

239
and bishops of,

118 Earl of Carlisle's tragedies, 68
Circulation of blood, Experiments upon, Elisha,

116
466 Holiday time, **

355
Clapham's sermon for beneft of sunday Maid of Lochlin,'

164
schools,
221 Mutius Scævola,

115
Clarke's animadversions on Dickson's Dropsy of membranes of brain, Treatise
translation of Carnot on the infinitesi.

on,

463
mal calculus,

359 Dundas (Mr.)'s letter to chairman, &c,
Cobbeti's letters on the peace, 333, 334 of E. India company, Observations on,
Collectanea maritima,
Colors of thin transparent bodies, Ob. Durham (Bishop of)'s charge to clergy,
servations concerning,

$40
Comeiras's edition of La Croix's Geo-
grapiiy,

541 EARLE's Welshman, - 116
Common prayer, Reeves's edition of Early lessons,

351
the,

36 Eden (Sir F. M.)'s letters on the peace,
Commons (house of), Review of prin:

335
ciples on which clergy are excluded Edgeworth (Maria)'s Belinda, 235
trom,

240

- Farly lessons, 351
Conjunction of Jupiter and Venus in

Thice stories for
Leo,
- 474 young children,

352
Contrast, Force of'. !.!.it

120 Education, Letters on, - -- 187
Curk barbour, Survey of,

586 -

Hints for plan of national, 220

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347

478

443

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